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Found 654 Collections

 

The Melting Pot at the United Shoe Machinery Corporation

This student activity includes a set of archival documents from the United Shoe Machinery Corporation. These documents can be used as resources to help students investigate the relationship between industry, education, and immigration in the early 20th century.

As students explore the collection, they should consider how each document helps them answer the following questions:

-Is it in the best interests of business to encourage citizenship and education? Why or why not?

-What do these materials say about what it means to be considered "American" in the early 20th century?

tags: school, learning, English, language, migration, Ellis Island, manufacturing, Progressives

Kate Harris
8
 

The Museum Idea

Museums and galleries play an important role in society. They preserve the past, enrich the present, and inspire the future. In this lesson, students will take a close look at museums, why they exist, and what the people who work in them do. By the end of the lesson, student's will create their own "Museum of Me." 

This lesson was inspired by an issue of Smithsonian's Art to Zoo and includes Minecraft: Education Edition extensions. It is part of the  2017 Museum Day Live! STEM Challenge

DOWNLOAD THE PDF TO COMPLETE THIS LESSON.

Museum Day Live!
10
 

The NHD @ NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2017: Taking a Stand in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2017 NHD Theme!

Below are some objects and videos to help you explore the 2017 NHD theme: Taking a Stand in History. These objects will help you consider the perspective of the African American experience in history.

These objects may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections and/or the hotspots to reveal object questions to spark your curiosity.

The artifact questions should encourage viewers to think and explore the history of the object or video on their own!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
46
 

The NHD at NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2018: Conflict and Compromise in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2018 NHD Theme!

Below are some documents, images, objects and videos to help you explore the 2018 NHD theme: Conflict and Compromise in History. These documents, images, objects and videos are intended to help highlight the African American experience and perspective in American and international history.

These documents, images, objects and videos may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections, questions to help with analysis, creative activities,  and/or the paper clip icon to reveal questions or comments to spark your curiosity.

#NHD2018 #NHD

National Museum of African American History and Culture
75
 

The Pony Express

This collection was created to display the importance of the  1860 Mailing Service known as The Pony Express. During the beginning of the Civil War messages were being sent out to war generals, soldiers and even enemy attackers. but in the 1800s there was no such thing as fast mail delivery. Letters and documents would take weeks or even months To be delivered to whom It was addressed. Many people saw this as a problem that no one could fix. But Russell, Majors, Waddell and William H. Russell Saw it as an opportunity to not only help America in the time of need but to also make a little money. The Pony Express was known for delivering mail in 10 days or less which was something that was unheard of and never done in this time period. And even though the Pony Express was only in business for 18 months it's shifted the views of mail carrying forever. In this collection you will see 12 Representations that are connected to the Pony Express.

Recruitment flyer

The Riders Oath

William Cody A.K.A Buffalo Bill

"La Mochila"  

The life of a rider

The Faces of The Pony Express

The Deadly route

Badge of honor

The Revolver

The trustee stead

Hollenberg Pony Express Station

The Special delivery


Karell Russell
12
 

The Power of Cats in Egypt in 30 BC Copy

Voice Over about Egyptian Cats and Gods  #CIEDigitalStoryTelling for Ellis by Katheerin Dimieri 4th prd 

KATHEERIN DIMIERI
21
 

The Progressive Era?

Objective: Students will be able to identify the objectives of the Progressive Movement through primary source analysis in order to evaluate their impact on American society.

Essential Questions: 

  • What were the main objectives of the Progressive Movement?
  • Is 'progressive' an appropriate term to define this era?
Emily Surman
19
 

The Pullman Porters and the Railcar: Nexuses of the Great Migration

The Pullman Porters and the railcar were carriers of hope during the era known as the Great Migration. Pullman Porters were employed by George Pullman who created the nation’s first luxury railcar and made his home in Chicago, Illinois. During the Great Migration, hundreds of thousands of African Americans sought greater employment and housing opportunities in northern cities like Chicago, Pittsburgh, and New York. They traveled to the North primarily on railcars though segregated from white passengers and in less comfortable conditions. The Pullman Porters were pillars in the Black community and made positive impacts on African American migrants, entrepreneurs, and social causes effecting the Black community.  

This collection displays the story of the Pullman Porters and demonstrates the railcar as a nexus of the Great Migration. A restored Pullman Palace railcar, Southern Railway No. 1200, is now housed at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. 

Keywords: Pullman Porters, George Pullman, Railcars, The Great Migration, NMAAHC, African American History, American History

Le'Passion Darby
13
 

The Ramayana

This teaching collection and student activity includes the resources necessary to teach an EDSITEment lesson on the Ramayana where students read closely to find examples of the Hindu concept of dharma.

Guiding questions are:

  • What is dharma?
  • How does the Ramayana teach dharma, one of Hinduism's most important tenants?

tags: Hinduism, Hindu, India, dharma, Ramayana, rama, epic, Vishnu

Kate Harris
11
 

The Road to Civil Rights

Sarah Billups
9
 

The Scopes Trial

This collection of photographs provides insight into the Scopes Trial in 1925. "Marcel C. LaFollette, an independent scholar, historian and Smithsonian volunteer uncovered rare, unpublished photographs of the 1925 Tennessee vs. John Scopes “Monkey Trial" in the Smithsonian Institution Archives. The nitrate negatives, including portraits of trial participants, and images from the trial itself and significant places in Dayton, were discovered in archival material donated to the Smithsonian by Science Service in 1971."

"Science Service is a Washington, D.C.-based organization founded in 1921 for the promotion of science writing and information about science in the media. Watson Davis (1896-1967), the Science Service managing editor, took these photographs when covering the Scopes trial as a reporter. In the 1925 trial, John Scopes was tried and convicted for violating a state law prohibiting the teaching of the theory of evolution. William Jennings Bryan served on the prosecution team, and Clarence Darrow defended Scopes."

Collection users might consider the following questions:

-How effective are court cases at swaying popular opinion? Can you think of other examples of this?

-How did this trial reflect the changes in mass media, science, and religion occurring in the 1920s?

-It is said that Bryan "won the case, but lost the argument." What is meant by that statement?

-How do these archival photographs challenge previously held conceptions of the case?

Source for text in quotes throughout collection: Smithsonian Institution Archives. Web. Accessed 16 Aug. 2016 http://siarchives.si.edu/research/scopes.html.

Kate Harris
14
 

The Survivors Who Haunt Us: Developing Global Competence by Understanding the Power of Resilience

These materials address a unit on resilience and global competence as related to and extended from The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  #SAAMteach

Yolanda Toni
13
 

The Three Branches of Government

This Collection contains resources to help students understand the three branches of government in the United States.

SWBT identify and describe the purposes of each branch of the United States government. 

#PZPGH


Jackie Pack
18
 

The Value of a Sketch

A design project’s aesthetics and cultural impact are usually the primary consideration as to the effectiveness and quality of a designer's approach to problem-solving. What is often overlooked in these perspectives are the various preliminary approaches that designers employ—how do we visualize and ultimately share our ideas with others?

Within design education, projects are usually conceived to help expose students to the “design process,” an often-complex journey of experiments and discoveries. This process helps guide students in the creation of future successful design solutions. With the progress of the digital experience (PowerPoint presentations, iPhone apps, and Virtual Reality), the art of the sketch seems to be a casualty of the current state of the design process.

What can we learn from a sketch? Is the sketch a dead art form, forever packed away in folders or archives never to be seen again? Or, can we reevaluate its historical contributions in the design process and creation of artful typographic syntax and hierarchy, image creation, and narrative development?

 Most often, these small, thumbnail sketches speak only to a limited audience (Art Directors, other designers, or only the designer themselves) and, therefore, usually have a limited impact. But, in the hands of a skilled and creative designer, these sketches can mean the difference between success or failure, the green light, or the idea being squashed.

As a supplement to several educational design projects, this collection attempts to expose students to the value of the simple pencil sketch. How can we use the sketching process to encourage young designers to visualize away from the computer and avoid the digital “sameness” pervasive in our visual world?

This collection attempts to chronicle the process of various designers and their projects (both large and small, complex, and simple) and presents their approach to preliminary ideation through the sketching process. The collection includes thumbnails, photographs, color studies, line reductions as well as the completed project in hopes of revealing The Value of a Simple Sketch.

Designers/Artist included:

Willi Kunz, (1943 - )  Swiss-born Kunz, played a significant role in the introduction of the new typography developed from Basel to the United States, where he currently lives and works.

Dan Friedman, (1945–1995) noted American graphic and furniture designer and educator. One of the significant contributors to the New Wave typography movement.

Painter Piet Mondrian (1872–1944) was the leader of the Dutch De Stijl movement, where he implemented an extreme visual vocabulary consisting of planes of primary colors, simplified right angles, and linear accents.

Tom Engeman, (1934 - ), American designer and Illustrator who has designed and illustrated several stamps for the United States Postal Service, including the Flags of Our Nation forever stamps and the 150th Anniversary of the Smithsonian commemorative stamp.

Ned Drew
109
 

The Way They Was- Thematic Links to To Kill a Mockingbird

This collection contains the provocative piece The Way They Was and asks students to make parallels to the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. It uses thinking routines such as "See/Think/Wonder", "Circle of Viewpoints", and "Claim/Support/Question". There is also a graphic organizer in the shape of a door that allows students to record the connections they see between the piece of art and the novel. This lesson can be used after Chapter 25 or at the end of the novel.

#SAAMteach

Sara Katlen
4
 

Thinking About "The Way We Worked"

In this short course, you'll learn about topics that inspired the traveling exhibition "The Way We Worked," produced by Museum on Main Street at the Smithsonian. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
28
 

Three Mysterious American Writers: Comparison and Contrast

This collection includes paintings of Harold Hart Crane, Edgar Allan Poe, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman that are blurry or undefined, and three photographs to show the actual appearance of these writers. In this student activity, students will be asked to look at the photographs and paintings of these American authors and form hypotheses to explain why the artists chose to blur them.  Students  will explore the commonalities and differences between the  paintings and photographs and use textual information or research to confirm their hypotheses. 

Hart Crane: Known for his poetry, he struggled financially and personally throughout his short life. See more information in the description box. 

Edgar Allan Poe: A poet and story writer of great originality, Poe suffered great poverty as one of the first Americans to try to make a living only as a writer. See more information in the description box. 

Charlotte Perkins Gilman: A feminist and social pioneer, Gilman also wrote stories, novels, and poetry. For more information on Gilman, see https://www.radcliffe.harvard....

1. What commonalities and differences do the paintings have? Create a list.

2. What emotions do these commonalities and differences provoke?

3. How do emotions affect the way one perceives an image? Compare and contrast the artworks with their photographic portraits. 

5. What information do photographs provide to deepen understanding of the paintings? 

Tags: poets; authors; mystery; creative writing; memoir; poetry; experimental writing.

Samantha Castaneda
7
 

Time

The theme of TIME can be explored in art using key concepts throughout the semester or year. Explore various concepts related to the idea of TIME by playing the Connections Card Game. The mind maps made after playing the game can be used as a reference throughout the course. 

Teacher Preparation:

  • Download and print images on card stock (resource attached to this collection). Create multiple sets for small groups to play the game.
  • Print Key Concept Cards (resource attached to this collection)

Student Activity:

  • Take turns choosing a card and connecting it to a key concept by placing it near an appropriate Concept Card.
  • Defend choice with evidence in the image.
  • After all cards have been played, students make inferences about how people experience, measure or represent time.
  • Small groups collaborate to draw a mind map to illustrate their ideas.
  • Present maps in a "Carousel Interview." One group member stays with the mind map to answer questions; other group members visit tables to explore mind maps and ask questions.
  • Return to original group. Encapsulate overarching ideas and record them on your group's mind map.
Jean-Marie Galing
27
 

Titus Kaphar Intersectionalities Starting With "Time Travel"

Included in this collection are several of Titus Kaphar's works in the "Unseen: Our Past in a New Light."  Ken Gonzales-Day is also featured in one portrait of an "Erased Lynching."  The general objective is for students of US Justice, Law, & Society to make connections and intersections, between the portraits in this special exhibition, and another portrait in the NPG.  This lesson is intended for undergraduate students, but could be modified for secondary education.  This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  #NPGteach

Jason Fabrikant
8
 

Transcontinental Railroad: the 19th Century "Network" of the Future

In 1862, the Pacific Railroad Act chartered the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific Railroad Companies, and tasked them with building a transcontinental railroad that would link the United States from East to West. Over the next seven years, the two companies would race toward each other starting from Sacramento, California in the West and Omaha, Nebraska to the East, both teams struggled to overcome  great engineering obstacles and physical risks to their workforce before the two lines were joined at Promontory, Utah, on May 10, 1869. This "network" connecting our nation and  continent, was a huge technological step forward for our country that incited many other technologies and industries.

Jodi Halligan M.Ed
13
 

Transcribe: Chinese Banknotes from the Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection

In this collection, the Smithsonian Transcription Center and the National Museum of American History's National Numismatic Collection invite you to help transcribe the languages recorded on historic Chinese Banknotes. This work will help ensure that researchers around the world can more easily find and use these collections. 

Collection includes: instructions on required and optional steps for transcription, translation, and transliteration; links to the Chinese Banknote transcription projects on the Smithsonian Transcription Center website; and more.

Keywords: currency, money, Chinese language, NNC, NMAH, American history, East Asian history, foreign language

Background

The Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection (NNC) is America's collection of monetary and transactional objects. This diverse and expansive global collection contains objects that represent every inhabited continent and span more than three thousand years of human history.

Established in the mid-19th century, several of the earliest additions to the NNC were artifacts from Japan, Korea, and China, including coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant from Japanese Emperor Meiji (received in 1881) and the 2,025 East Asian coins, amulets, and notes from George Bunker Glover’s private collection (received in 1897). These donations were the foundation of the NNC’s East Asian holdings, which continues to grow with new acquisitions, such as the Howard F. Bowker collection in 2017.

During 2017-2018, the NNC digitized more than 8,000 of its East Asian Coins, making them publicly accessible and available for research worldwide. The NNC is now working to digitize 6,000 Chinese notes and paper transactional objects that range from the Ming Dynasty to the present day.

One of the main challenges to the digitization process is the transcription of several Asian alphabets, which would increase accessibility and searchability for the many items in this collection. Sometimes this can be done quickly, but often the process is too lengthy for NNC team members to complete while moving the project forward efficiently. In order to continue to share these objects rapidly, we need your help! 

The digitization of the East Asian coins and Chinese banknotes would not have been possible without the generous support of the the Howard F. Bowker family and Michael Chou. 

For full instructions, please see this page on the Smithsonian Transcription Center website.

Smithsonian Transcription Center
12
 

U Street Riots Two Part Lesson

These six images give a glimpse of the damage done during the 1968 riots on U street following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.  The images are all attributed to Scurlock Studios, which students will study more in depth in a separate collection.  

The two day lesson centered around this collection begins with a gallery walk.  The Guiding Question for this lesson are:

-What can primary source photographs tell us about an event in history?

-How did the 1968 riots change Washington DC?


The Big Idea for this lesson is:

One event can have lasting effects on the history of a place.

 Each student will have a packet featuring  six 'See, Think, Wonder' pages, and a final page titled 'Gallery Walk Debrief.'  On Day 1, computers will be set up at six tables throughout the classroom, with all computers on a given table showing one of the six images in the collection.  At the teacher's direction, student partnerships will have 3-5 minutes to stop at each station and fill out one of the 'See, Think, Wonder' pages.  

At the conclusion of the gallery walk, student will meet with their partner for approximately 3 minutes to discuss the important question on the last page of their packet: 'Based on the images you viewed, how do you think the riots on U Street changed Washington DC?'  Once students have discussed, they will have approximately 5 minutes to write at least two sentences in response to this question.

On Day 2 of the lesson, the teacher will use a projectable screen in the class room  to walk through the interactive Washington Post article about the 1968 riots, allowing time to pause and watch each embedded video and answer any pressing questions.  

At the conclusion of the article, students will spend approximately 5 minutes at their tables discussing how their understanding of the 1968 riots has changed or expanded based on the Washington Post piece.  The teacher will then lead a discussion that should convey, at the very least, the following points:

-The U Street riots were widespread and caused major damage to areas of the city including but not limited to the U Street Corridor.  

-Many business' in DC were forever wiped out because of the riots and entire neighborhoods took, in some cases, decades to fully recover.

- Martin Luther King's death served as the final straw for many African Americans both in DC and around the country who had long been suffering under the crippling effects of segregation, discrimination, and racism.  

- Following the 1968 riots, most white people left the city.  

Following the teacher discussion, students will have approximately 5 minutes to write down an answer to the single question on the worksheet titled Washington Post Article Debrief:  After viewing the Washington Post article about the 1968 riots, what new information did you learn about how the 1968 riots changed Washington DC?

#LearnWithTR




Peter Gamber
10
 

U.S. History: Code Talkers

The following collection contains a possible lesson plan with ideas on how to use the resources.  The collection consists of information that identifies the bravery and contributions of Native American Code Talkers.  

#EthnicStudies

Rick Bleemel
12
 

Understanding Opera

A learning resource for students about opera. The images in this collection focus on different portrayals of opera singers and different types of spaces. As you look through them and complete the activities, think about how they change your viewpoint and understanding of opera.

#SmithsonianMusic

Alexander Graves
12
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