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Found 701 Collections

 

Captured by Indians: Warfare and Assimilation on the 18thC Frontier.

After the Britains won the British, French and Indian War, the victors made promises to the native Americans that the former French claims would not be occupied by the English colonists. The Quebec Act forbade settlers to pass beyond the ridge of the Appalachian Mountains. Britain soon discovered that it was impossible to stop the settlers from crossing into Indian lands. The reaction of the native-Americans was swift and furious. Raiding parties killed and/or captured hundreds of these frontier farmers.

Arthur Glaser
34
 

Unpacking Sol LeWitt’s Open Cubes

Students will analyze Sol LeWitt's variations of the open cube to apply their knowledge of drawing cubes using isometric paper and nets of cubes. Students will extend their knowledge of surface area while observing LeWitt's Cube without a cube and make a generalization for two formulas.

This is an activity for a grade 6 or 7 geometry class. Prerequisite knowledge: volume, surface area and nets of cubes.

Students can do the work in groups of 2-3 there are sections for thinking routines and prompts for students to upload photos of their work.

Amanda Riske
8
 

Election of 1876

The United States presidential election of 1876 was one of the most disputed presidential elections in American history

kamren crandall
5
 

National History Day 2018 - Compromise After Conflict

How has compromise been used to end ongoing conflict?  U.S. History sample topics for National History Day 2018 includes an overview about treaties from the exhibition "Nation to Nation: Treaties between the United States and American Indian Nations",  "The Canandaigua Treaty of 1794", and "The Indian Removal Act of 1830".  Use the objects, videos, and online lessons in this collection to help inform your National History Day project.

#NHD2018 #NHD

National Museum of the American Indian Education Office
10
 

Modular Designs

Observe and discuss selected images. . . 

  • What shapes or forms are combined in each image?
  • What purpose do you think it was designed for? Why do you think that?
  • What do all the images have in common?

After discussion, construct a definition of the term "modular."

ART MAKING CHALLENGES: 

  • Create a modular sculpture for a community space using cut and folded paper or tag board.
  • Draw a modular design for a building with a specific purpose.
  • Design modular storage for a small apartment. 
  • Design modular furniture that could be rearranged for different purposes. 

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Festivals

Everyone enjoys a festival or celebration! Let's look at some. . . 

  • Observe  images and guess which culture each represents.
  • Play "I Spy Juxtaposition." Work with a small group to examine an image and find where the artist has juxtaposed symbols or text with the image to create meaning. 
  • What might you include in an artwork about a festival or celebration?  Would there be dances, special music, food, clothing, or activities?

Art making challenge:  Collaborate in a small group to create a design for a booth, stage, or other area for a cultural tradition at a festival. Designs will be combined into a festival mural.

Jean-Marie Galing
18
 

3D Technology and Repatriation of the Kéet-S’aaxw

This student activity introduces students to the concept of repatriation of cultural heritage items to the tribes to whom they belong, and the ways that museums and Native American groups are now using 3D technology to aid in the process. A killer whale hat, or kéet-s'aaxw, was requested to be repatriated by members of the Tlingit tribe. The Smithsonian Institution, under the repatriation provisions of the National Museum of the American Indian Act, did so. In the years following, the clan's leader decided that it might be beneficial to 3D scan the image in order to preserve its details and protect it in case of loss or fire. Having this data allowed the museum to create an accurate replica to be used for educational purposes, and provided the tribe with peace of mind. Learn more about this story and other cases of repatriation and replication in this collection which includes a 3D model and tour, video, website, and images of objects that have been part of the process.

Essential Questions include:

  • How does the current process of repatriation reflect a change in traditional relationships between museums and indigenous groups?
  • What kinds of guidelines should be used to determine which objects should be repatriated?
  • What benefits does 3D technology provide for museums and Native American tribes? Can you envision other scenarios where 3D technology might play a similarly beneficial role?

Tags: Native American, American Indian, Tlingit, repatriation, replication, 3D technology, whale hat, indigenous, rights, change over time, museums, anthropology

Kate Harris
10
 

Memoirs & Portraits: Creating Dynamic Characters

This collection supports students to write their own memoirs and is aligned to the Teacher's College Reading Writing Project (TCRWP) Memoir Writing Unit. One objective of this unit is students will create "well-developed characters who change." Through the examination of portraits matched with mentor texts, students have the opportunity to examine how artists capture the complexity of people through visual art and language.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGteach

Michelle Van Lare
21
 

North Pacific Coast Weaving Traditions

This collection explores plaited and twined woven objects from the North Pacific Coast. A link to the website "Woven Together" introduces students to the Nuu-chah-nulth community and language. Simple step-by-step illustrations using easily accessible materials allow students to learn plaiting and twining techniques.

Two videos at the end introduce the classroom to master weavers and sisters, Teri Rofkar and Shelly Laws.  They explain the twining technique with examples of their work, including Chilkat woven blankets.

National Museum of the American Indian Education Office
10
 

From Deer to Dance: How-to Demonstrations and Informational Videos

This collection comes from a family festival at the National Museum of the American Indian that explored uses of leather in Native communities - literally from the hunting and tanning of deer and their hides, to their use in ritual and everyday life. The collection includes demonstrations of deer-hide tanning, moccasin making, bead working, instructions to make a leather pouch and a daisy chain bracelet, and an interview and performance by Lawrence Baker and the White Oak Singers.

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Taxing Revolution

This collection presents the importance of the tax on tea and other items during the American Revolution. Britain is known for having tea, and is used in daily lifestyles of the people in Britain and America. After the war the British placed taxes on everything such as sugar, glass, paper, and tea. Riots, boycotts, and protest occurred one after another.  American people did not appreciate the extra money they had to pay for the items they use for daily activities, so they decided to stand up for themselves and go against the British to become an independent nation.  The taxes brought the people together as a community against the government. 

This collection focuses on the role taxed tea plays in during the American revolution. It contains documents, pictures, and items about the cause and effect of the war and the Townshend act. There are also famous cartoons included that exaggerated the relationship between the British and Americans. War led to the American having debt which led to the British taxing the colonist. They taxed on stamps, sugar, glass, paper, and most importantly, tea. All these taxes angered the colonist, so The British removed some, but still continued to place taxes on the people. The taxing led to a war for independence because the American people were just tired of the British control. They wanted to become a new independent Country and the people wished for their freedom. They would do anything to remove the tax on their items even if it means rioting. The people of America started to come together as a nation and brutally start to fight for their freedom. 

Jenny Lin
10
 

Slaves and Religion: A Blend of African Religion and European Christianity

This collection of items shows things like items and objects that were used to carry out religious ceremonies of the enslaved African people. This collection will also look at what exactly religion was and looked like during slavery times. The Africans that were brought over to the Americas for the purpose of slavery had no knowledge of Christianity or any other European religion. Africans had their own beliefs and since brought over to slavery, could no longer practice them freely. Slaves were eventually exposed to Christianity by their slave masters  and that was the only religion that the master permitted. Slaves ultimately saw the European religion, Christianity, as possible freedom.  The slaves often resisted the teachings and exposure of Christianity because of their strong commitment and belief in their motherland religion. Eventually there was a mixture of the slaves original religion back in their homeland and the newly learned Christianity. Enslaved people also eventually appealed to Christianity and turned it into a possible road to freedom. This was no good sign for slave masters, which soon leads to punishment of things like open worship and Bible reading. We will be looking at many things in this collection from items to secret gathering places that the slaves used.

Tyeema Brockington
10
 

Carnival Celebrations: Masks (Lesson Plans, Activities, and Background Information)

This collection comes from a set of lessons plans to introduce students to the culture of Puerto Rico by looking at customs and objects - specifically masks - connected to the annual celebration of Carnival. The lessons are split into four levels, covering grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. They were originally adapted from a set of activities that appeared in Our Story in History: A Puerto Rican Carnival, a website produced by the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History - also shown in a link inside the collection, along with instructions for students to make their own masks. The lessons include objects from the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in New York, the George Gustav Heye Center, and the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History.


Philippa Rappoport
6
 

How to Make a Ti Leaf Lei: Demonstration video, children's stories, dances, and contextual images

Lei making is an important part of Hawaiian culture. These twisted strands are worn on important occasions and given as gifts of welcome. In this collection you'll find a demonstration video by Mokihana Scalph, as well as performances of children's stories, dance performances, and images of leis and ti leaves, to give context to the performances.

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Native American Beading: Examples, Artist Interview, Demonstration and Printable Instructions for Hands-on Activity

This collection looks at examples of bead work among Native American women, in particular Kiowa artist Teri Greeves, and helps students to consider these works as both expressions of the individual artist and expressions of a cultural tradition.

The collection includes work samples and resources, an interview with Ms. Greeves, demonstration video of how to make a Daisy Chain bracelet, and printable instructions.

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Native American Ledger Art: Informational Video and Classroom Activity

In this collection, Educator Ramsey Weeks (Assiniboine, Lenape, and Hidatsa), from the National Museum of the American Indian, talks about Native American Ledger Art, and shares ideas for family and classroom "winter count" activities. The activities are suitable for English, art, history, and social studies classrooms.

The collection also includes information and resources about Winter Counts from the National Museum of the American Indian, the National Museum of Natural History, the National Anthropological Archives, the Smithsonian Institution Archives, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Libraries, and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access. 

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

A "Family Lessons" Storybook Activity for the Classroom or Home, with examples of student work

This collection includes instructions and ideas for a classroom activity designed to get children and their families talking and creating together. It is suitable for K-5 classrooms, as an art, English, or social studies-based activity. Included here are examples of student work (images and video of students reading their books), as well as images from classroom displays.

In this activity, a 1st grade teacher from a bilingual school in Washington, D.C., used what we called the "Connections" handmade storybook design to have her students share important family lessons. She described how she did the activity: "I loved the book project and found that it was a way to get parents involved in making a book with their child at home. I pre-made the books since I thought the instructions were a little tricky. The instructions were to discuss and write about a Life Lesson that their families taught them. Our students created bilingual Spanish/English books. The format was perfect for this because it could be English on one side and Spanish on the other. Students enjoyed hanging their books up outside of the class for others to read and then sharing them with the class. It really helped them to understand what important life lessons families teach them and it helped to bring students' home knowledge into the classroom. We connected the books to our Life Lessons unit and plan to do the same thing this year."

This project is based on a handmade book design that can be found, along with several others, in another collection: Fun for the Whole Family: Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/1tozk88HXhnFBU6d.

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

15th Amendments

Allowing any citizen the right to vote no matter race or color of skin.

Jeremiah Fontenot
6
 

The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS

This activity can be used on its own or as a starting point for an interdisciplinary exploration of the global implications of HIV/AIDS.

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time considering other viewpoints on HIV/AIDS. It uses Project Zero Thinking Routines and several images that allow students to explore multiple perspectives on HIV/AIDS. I have also created a separate collection with more images that could be used as starting points for further conversation called “The Global Implications of HIV/AIDS - An Interdisciplinary Exploration.” 

The focus of this particular collection is to allow students to begin exploring at the individual level and then keep zooming out to the global level to engage with HIV/AIDS as a global issue.

Part I: The individual and Individuals within a Society

Using a work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres and the Project Zero Thinking Routine “See, Think, Wonder,” students can begin the conversation about the toll of HIV/AIDS on the individual level. Depending on student comments, this could also involve individuals within a society.  The video included here could be shown as a follow-up explanation or could simply be used to help the teacher and not shown to students. The images of the quilt panel and the poster could both be used with the Project Zero Thinking Routine “Circle of Viewpoints” to help further the society or systems approach. These images allow students to explore the political complexities and how this can directly impact individuals within a group. Again, the video included could be used to enhance teacher and/or student knowledge.

 

Part II: Engaging in conversations about Society and Global Issues

Students will use the Project Zero Thinking Routine “See, Think, Wonder” to explore the Gapminder HIV Chart graphic (axes have been removed). If the group of students you are working with have less experience with thinking routines in general or are less inclined to take risks in sharing out, skip to the original version of the Gapminder HIV Chart graphic instead. At either starting point, more information can be revealed as students pose thoughts and wonders about the data provided. The link to the TedTalk can help students better understand what the graph is showing and perhaps be another starting point for a dialogue on the complexities of HIV/AIDS.

 

Part III: Reflection

There is some reflection built into the “Circle of Viewpoints” Thinking Routine but it is worthwhile to also reflect at the end of the activity. I have provided the Project Zero “I used to think…But now I think” Thinking Routine slide but a teacher could also choose to return to the Wrap Up questions provided from the earlier “Circle of Viewpoints” Thinking Routine and revisit what the students had mentioned from Part II. 

Emily Veres
13
 

Exploring the Science of skin color

What was the role of Science in the construction of race? How can various written works and works of art begin a conversation about race as a social construct? These series of activities allow for a dialogue about this complex issue.

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group and whether TED Talks are watched as a class or individually as preparation for class. 

Part I begins with a work of art to stimulate thought using the Project Zero Thinking Routine "See-Think-Wonder."  Students will then read an article and view an advertisement. Another thinking routine is used here to uncover the complexities of this particular advertisement. In the next parts, students view TED Talks followed by different kinds of media. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking.

 

Part I: Identifying the focus and beginning a conversation

Starting with an artwork by Byron Kim and Glenn Ligon, students use the "See-Think-Wonder" Project Zero Thinking Routine to try and make sense of the image. After a class discussion, students should be guided to read a short article about skin-colored ballet shoes that would be more representative of the skin tones of actual ballet dancers. Teachers could choose to help students digest this article or move directly into the Ivory soap advertisement. Using the "Beauty and Truth" Project Zero Thinking Routine, students can uncover the underlying complexity of this image.

 

Part II: The evolution of skin color and telling the story of a work of art

After viewing the TEDTalk by Nina Jablonski about the illusion of skin color, students can reflect individually by answering the question "Why is it problematic to view race as a biological concept and categorize individuals based on skin color?" Then, using Project Zero’s "The Story Routine," students can create meaning for a work of art. Students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Photography, an essay on color and race and a work of art from that essay

  Angelica Dass’s photography challenges how we think about skin color and ethnic identity. The TEDTalk describes her Humanae project and allows for further dialogue about the complexity of skin color. Teachers could choose to help students identify important aspects of the talk or move directly into silent reading of Zora Neale Hurston’s essay "How It Feels to be Colored Me." Students can use the "Step inside-step out-step back" Project Zero Thinking Routine to identify perspectives addressed in this essay. Glenn Ligon created a work of art using this essay and students can use this piece to further the conversation with the same thinking routine or simply as part of the reflection.  A final reflection about skin color and the social construct of race can be completed either as a group or individually using the "I Used to think…; But Now I Think…" thinking routine. Teachers should consider providing a more focused prompt that suits the goals/objectives of their lesson.

Emily Veres
12
 

Environmental Impact of Canoes -- Lesson Plans and Information

Look through the photographs. Spend a few minutes looking at each one, then pick three photos and consider the following questions: What are the common elements of the photos? During what time period do you think the photos were taken? In what part of the world were the photos taken? How are they similar? Different? You will record your observations on the quiz at the end of the photograph section.

As you investigate the artifacts, images, and readings in this collection, consider how the environment has been impacted by the development of canoes/boats? How were animals (birds, mammals, reptiles) affected by the launching of canoes/boats? How is the land affected by canoes/boats?


Activity:

By using the pictures, students will be able for how the first canoe development may have affected the environment; students will construct an explanation of how the environment has since been impacted. They will then work to design solutions for ways of making less of an impact to the environment based on factors that can lead to the disruption of the protected waterways.

Meaning of Canoe:

The word 'canoe' originated from the word 'kenu' - meaning dugout. These seagoing boats were used by the Carib Indians of the Caribbean islands, and were made of large tree trunks which were shaped and hollowed, and were strong enough to travel between the islands.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

1. Activate students’ prior knowledge. Tell students that they will learn about human-related impacts that threaten the environment.

2. Use a model to explore how the use of canoes effects the environment.

3. Construct explanations and design solutions for impacts of boating on healthy waterways.

4. Identify ways individuals can influence impacts of the boating industry.

Essential Questions:

1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of the development of the boating issues based on the use of the canoe?

2. How do we assess the environmental, social, cultural, and economic benefits and drawbacks of various solutions to a problem?

3. How do we ultimately decide what solution is the 'best'?

4. What are the major concerns of using the waterways for leisure activities and for business?

Materials:

- Computer lab with one computer for every student (computers should have Internet access) and  the equipment to project onto a screen or white board

- One pair of audio headphones for each student

- Projector

- Access to the Learning Lab Collections

Teacher Prep:

- Review articles that emphasize the impact of environmental damage do to boating

http://www.pbs.org/wayfinders/...This website has an activity that will help the students understand the  building of the canoe

- www.savetheboundarywaters.org

- http://www.canadianicons.ca/canoe.php?page=1

- http://newburykayak.com/history-of-canoes/

- http://antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/liu/index.html

- http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/outdoor-activit...



Michele Hubert
22
 

Hudson River School

Today, the United States' borders are much larger than what they were 250 years ago. With the release from British authority, the United States faced the challenge of expanding westwards, bound by no outside law.

Art was perhaps the most compelling form of storytelling. Whether it was about certain war victories, discovery of land, or peace treaties, art was a popular way of depicting what had taken place.

Art during this era was also a form of propaganda: it had to be beautiful, depict the west as a place of grand spectacles and such. It shouldn't be a surprise to anyone that heavy romantic themes would dominate this era of art. This was called the Hudson River School movement, which often exaggerated the beauty of American nature. As a result, we get to explore three major themes associated with Western Expansion: discovery, exploration, and settlement. Examine how these pictures make you as the audience feel, and how it might relate to the successful expansion westwards.

Marjon Santiago
30
 

Decades of Transformation: Bridging the 1920s and 30's

Each item in this collection reflects the changing culture of America between the two World Wars. As we read The Great Gatsby and Of Mice and Men, consider how these pieces show the change of mindset across the decades.

Your task: select 5 artifacts and write a short paragraph for each saying how the object relates to 1) the era it is from, 2) to two texts, and 3) the other objects in you collection. Do not answer the three items like a list; rather, think about having your entire paragraph answer these questions: Why did I choose this object for this collection? What does it add to the whole? How can I interpret this object for the visitors of my gallery?

For your writing voice, sound authoritative, like a museum placard (those little signs next to objects). You do not need direct text evidence, but you do need to reference one or both of the texts.

Jacob Carlson
29
 

Hurricanes

Students will use the See/Think/Wonder strategy to make inferences about Hurricanes. 

Danielle Friend
5
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