Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(1,014)
(5,289)
(5,404)
(3,938)
(6,003)
(68)
(2,145)
(1,557)
(666)
(2,807)
(1,077)
(951)

Found 6,303 Collections

 

The Smithsonian's Haiti Cultural Recovery Project

This topical collection includes information about efforts at the Smithsonian to rescue, recover, safeguard and help restore Haitian artwork, artifacts, documents, media and architectural features damaged and endangered by the earthquake and its aftermath.

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

The Snowy Day

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Join us for an exclusive screening of the Daytime Emmy Award-winning animated film The Snowy Day, based on Ezra Jack Keats' 1962 classic story. Narrated by Laurence Fishburne and with character voices by Regina King, Angela Bassett, and Jamie-Lynn Sigler, the film follows young Peter’s magical, snowy walk to his Nana's house to bring home their Christmas Eve dinner. One the way, he meets some new (and diverse) friends who come together to celebrate many traditions. A very special day indeed!

Discovery Theater
51
 

The Social Power of Music

This collection serves as a preview for the fourth of six seminar sessions in the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.”

James Deutsch and Atesh Sonneborn of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (CFCH) will explore with Fellows the social relevance of music, and how music conveys meaning in our lives. They will also take Fellows on a guided tour of the CFCH collections.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

The Soul's Expression: Identity, Individuality, & the Spirit in Visual Art

Art provides a pathway for individuals to express their inner self while also capturing the outer—this great wide world so intricate it's difficult to define.  Throughout history, humans have sought to  comprehend both their environment and their own inherent cultural uniqueness. This search has become symbolized in their artistic accomplishments and aesthetic heritage. Whether through representations of specific individuals and the human figure or awe-inspiring works of architecture, these art pieces are a window into the creative core of our past. 

In this collection, we will observe the ways in which the soul/spirit has been expressed in art, and how human creativity sheds light upon both individual and cultural identities and its varied interpretations throughout the ages. This collection is organized in three symbolic steps on a stone staircase entitled "The Stone Path of Eternity." To truly travel through each piece, I have included an image, a brief description of the work under information, and then, signified by the yellow (1) above, I've provided my own analysis and interpretation of the piece in its relationship to the collection theme. 

Through lingering through the "Stone Path of Eternity," which is represented by the first two tiles, we will from one stone to the next in seeking the many ways in which the soul's expression can be defined. 

In Stone Number One, "The Spirit's Encased Construct," we'll see how architecture and large-scale artistic projects merge to reflect both cultural identity and the individuality of their leaders through works from ancient Babylonia, Egypt, the Byzantine Empire and into the combinations made possible by the aesthetic  innovations of modern times. 

Shifting step to Stone Number Two, "Human Identity Immortalized in Matter," we delve into the ways in which the human figure is represented and what these images can share with us in terms of the varying levels, purposes, intentions behind the artist's created expressions and impact of depicting the Spirit on Earth. This idea is exemplified in creations ranging from the Paleolithic period to modern times, with examples from Egypt, Ancient Greece,  the Italian Renaissance and the 20th century popular culture. 

Finally, in Stone Number Three,"Individuals and Spirituality Entwine," we step into the door of the spirit directly, traveling through the many methods which cultures apply in trying to simultaneously convey and understand what realms are in union with and beyond this life.  Some cultures who address this idea in their artistic tradition are seen in instances of Egyptian art and work from ancient and Hellenistic Greece, as well as both the Italian Renaissance, Northern European Renaissance, and contemporary Western art. 

 The intended audience for this collection is just as varied as my subject matter. Those who might be drawn to this collection are people attracted to the enigmas of life and death, who have questioned their place in society and the mysteries this world has to hold, and are curious to know more about how, historically, cultures have related to these probing questions—for, as you will see, they certainly have existed as long as humans have walked the earth. No matter if you're in high school, college, or beyond formal education, I hope you will find my musings on these artworks and their meanings compelling and thought-provoking. 

Renowned artist and poet William Blake once wrote, "To see the world in a grain of sand, and to see heaven in a wild flower, hold infinity in the palm of your hands, and eternity in an hour."   From the most abstract art to the remarkably realistic, there is always an image of ourselves, in the an esoteric sense, waiting to be found within.  With its timeless method, Art seeks to create a definition for this all-encompassing and ever-evading essence and I hope to continue that quest with you as we explore this collection. #AHMC2019

Emma Geller
30
 

The Soviet Sputnik Satellite

Take a look at these resources that recall the development and launch of the Sputnik Satellite by the Soviet Union, and the start of the "Space Race" around the world!
Stephanie Hearn
11
 

The Space Race

Bridget Trabbold
8
 

The Space Race

This topical collection is an overview of the major events and developments of the space race that could supplement a lesson on the Cold War; it includes photos and videos.
Goal: After exploring the collection, students will have a better understanding of the space race, how it was influenced by world politics, and how it influenced world politics.

Tags: Sputnik, Apollo missions, space race, cold war, moon, moon landing
Jade Lintott
23
 

The Space Race

This topical collection is an overview of the major events and developments of the space race that could supplement a lesson on the Cold War; it includes photos and videos.
Goal: After exploring the collection, students will have a better understanding of the space race, how it was influenced by world politics, and how it influenced world politics.

Tags: Sputnik, Apollo missions, space race, cold war, moon, moon landing
Susan Ogilvie
23
 

The space race Eric Murrell

The competition between The United States and The Soviet Union to get to the moon first

Eric Murrell
6
 

The Space Race Influences Mid-Century Pop Culture

Take a look at the many ways in which participation in the 'Space Race' influenced pop culture in mid-century American households.
Stephanie Hearn
12
 

The St. Lawrence Island Yupik People and Their Culture

By Paapi Merlin Koonooka (St. Lawrence Island Yupik ), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)


Sea, Land, Rivers

Sivuqaq, the Yupik name for St. Lawrence Island, rises out of the Bering Sea in the heart of a vast and bountiful marine ecosystem. All around us, depending on the time of year, we have walrus, whales and seals. Standing on the point at Gambell, you can watch ducks and seabirds flying by in endless motion over the sea. Our island lies just below the Arctic Circle, so the winters are long and often extreme. The wind gusts at fifty miles per hour, and the wind chill can get to minus fifty degrees Fahrenheit or lower. When spring and summer bring longer daylight and new life, people travel out from the villages of Gambell and Savoonga to their hunting and fishing camps around the island. Many of those places are ancient settlements where our ancestors lived up to two thousand years ago.

I was born and raised in Gambell and have been a subsistence hunter there for my entire life, going back to when we traveled with dog teams instead of on snow machines and all-terrain vehicles. Marine mammals, fish, birds, eggs, reindeer and wild plants are important in the island diet throughout the year, far more so than store-bought foods. On the tundra and mountainsides people gather ququngaq (willow leaf), nunivak (roseroot), angukaq (dwarf fireweed) and various edible roots. In late summer the aqavzik (cloudberry) and pagunghaq (crowberry) ripen.

Walrus have always been essential to our way of life. We hunt them in open water and later on the frozen ocean, making use of nearly everything as either food or material. The meat and fat are bundled into large tuugtuq (meatballs) to store in underground food cellars, and in the past that meat sustained our dog teams as well. Good-quality hides of female walrus are stretched, split, cured and stitched to cover the angyapik (hunting boat). Walrus stomachs become heads for drums, and their intestines, ivory and whiskers are transformed into adornment and art. Our predecessors used the skins to make tough rope and covers for the nenglu (traditional house) and interior aargha (sleeping room). They spun walrus sinew into thread and carved the tusks into tools and sled runners.

I am a whaling captain like my grandfather, granduncles and father before me, and I serve on the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission. Traditionally, the captain prepared for whaling in a religious way, using charms, special songs and rituals that showed the great respect we feel for this animal. While these rituals are no longer practiced, strict hunting protocols and the responsibility of the captain remain unchanged. A bowhead whale is so immense and powerful that hunters, even though armed with modern weapons, are really at its mercy. We use skin-covered boats and sails rather than motors during the approach, keeping absolute silence, because whales have a very sharp sense of hearing. But they know we are there even if there is no sound. That is why we say that a whale decides to let itself be taken, not the other way around. One whale provides an abundance of food that is shared with families on the island and across Alaska.

Our hunting lifestyle has never been harmful to the animal species. Nature has her own way of opening up the ice and sea for us or withholding access. During storms we have to stay at home and wait for a change. When the weather is nice, the conditions may still not be right for going out, even if walrus are floating by on top of the ice floes. Sometimes we will be punished this way if we’ve failed in our respect. But as long as the creatures make themselves available to us, we will gather them for food and traditional needs.


Community and Family

The people of the island have close ties to the Yupik communities of Ungaziq and Sireniki on the Siberian coast, and we speak dialects of the same language. Before the cold war began in the late 1940s, our families traveled back and forth to visit, trade and seek marriage partners. The forty-mile trip took a full day in a skin boat using sail and paddles. Visits resumed in the 1980s after glasnost took hold in Russia, and now with a fast powerboat and calm seas, the crossing takes only two or three hours.

Some of my best memories from childhood are of traveling with my dad. He had a wonderful dog team, and in the wintertime we would go on the sled to trap white fox. Even in the summer we’d take it across the gravel and tundra. When I started raising a family I did the same thing. We would hitch up a team of twelve dogs to pull our heavy sled, which was nine feet long with steel runners. As a child you really look forward to going out with your parents and elders for food gathering and hunting, because you want to learn.

I sometimes think of early days when everyone was living in nenglut (traditional houses). They would go seal hunting on the ice, pulling whale baleen toboggans behind them to bring back the meat. You had a backpack and a rifle slung over your shoulders and an ice tester to see where it was safe to walk. You had to observe the ice and the direction it was moving, making sure not to get caught on an outgoing current. Boys were doing all that by the age of ten or twelve, and by fifteen you had to know everything. Your parents and elders made sure you were ready, or you weren’t allowed to go alone.

Our culture is changing rapidly in some ways, more slowly in others. Fluency in the Yupik language is declining in the younger generations, although among the older people our daily conversation continues to be in Yupik. There is less respect among some young people now for their parents and elders, too much television and video gaming, problems with drugs and alcohol. We need to find a balance between traditional and modern ways, and I believe the best way to do that is through education. If you can be successful in your formal education, you will be in a strong position to help preserve your Yupik heritage. I’m glad to see so many young people still going out with their families to the places where we have always hunted and fished, even if now they travel on machines instead of on foot or by dog sled. They are still eating the same foods that we have always gathered and staying connected to our land and way of life.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

The remoteness of the island has helped to sustain some of the ways of our forebears. The practices of atuq and aghula (Yupik drumming, singing and dancing) were never interrupted, despite the introduction of Christianity, and people continue to compose new songs and motions. Both communities on the island hold dance celebrations where we welcome visitors and performers from mainland Alaska, Russia and beyond. Other ceremonies are more family-oriented, marking life events such as marriage and the birth and naming of a child. When a young person catches his first seal, a special small celebration is held to share the catch with relatives, making sure that everyone gets a taste. The same thing happens with your first bird.

Many of the former ceremonial practices pertained to hunting, especially whaling. To prepare for the season, a captain would use certain songs that were specific to each clan. The purpose was to please the whale spirits. When the hunters captured a whale, the boats would come back in a line with the successful captain and crew in front. Everyone was deeply thankful, and they celebrated by feasting, singing and dancing. That feeling of appreciation and gratitude for the food that has been provided is just as strong today, even though our beliefs and customs have been modified.

The Yupik culture has a very long, rich history, and at the Smithsonian you will see artifacts that our ancestors created hundreds or even thousands of years ago. Today many of the island’s residents are world-renowned Native artists whose work is shown in national and international museums and art galleries. Some of the ivory they use comes from archaeological sites, and this material, crucial to sustaining life generations ago, is equally important today because of the income generated by art sales. But much more than that, their work is a celebration of our culture, heritage and continuing way of life.

Tags: St. Lawrence Island Yupik, Yupik, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

The Stamp Act

The Stamp Act, which was passed by the British Parliament in March of 1765, required all American colonists to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper that they used. Papers that were used daily such as newspapers, legal documents, and playing cards were also included.  The money collected was used to help pay off the costs of protecting the American frontier near the Appalachian Mountains. 

The issue with the Stamp Act was not the cost. It was because it was an attempt by England to raise money in the colonies without the approval of the colonial legislatures. The colonists believed that if this tax was allowed to pass with no resistance, then there would be more unnecessary taxation that would come in the future. The stamp act had a positive effect for the colonists because it caused the colonists become bolder when it came to expressing how they felt about political issues.

This led to the common phrase at the time, "no taxation without representation" and an uproar in American colonies. As a result, a man named Patrick Henry proposed seven resolutions against the stamp act, and the first four were adopted by the House of Burgesses.

Items that were relevant to the stamp act and are included in this collection:

Stamp Act Box, 1766: was used after the stamp act was over

No stamp act teapot: a representation of how people felt about the stamp act

Patrick Henry delivering his celebrated speech in the House of Burgesses, Virginia (photomechanical print)

Stamp from the stamp act of 1765

1p stamp of 1765 proof: a stamp used in this time period

Carter Braxton- a member of the House of Burgesses

Patrick Henry sculpture

4c Patrick Henry quote single

Appalachian Evening (painting) : the area of the country that the profit of the stamp act would pay to protect

"The Virginia Gazette" Newspaper: example of something that would be taxed

Source used in the intro:


http://www.history.org/history...

Kai Lockette
10
 

The Stamp Act

The Stamp Act was an act passed by the British in 1765. The Act was enforced to require the colonist to pay a fee or tax on every piece of printed paper they used. Items like legal documents, license, newspapers, and even playing cards were taxed. They had to buy paper from the British that had official stamps to show they paid the tax. Colonist could only pay the taxes in gold and silver, not even paper money. The money gathered from the Stamp Act was used to help pay for the French and Indian War. It was used to pay for things the troops needed in exchange for their service.

Alexis Chaney
10
 

The Start of Black Hair Care

I have a strong connection with my natural hair. I love to wash it, wear it, and care for it. I really have to thank the many African American women from the past for paving the way for great hair care that's available today. Hair care styling became more important through the years. My collection features styles and products throughout the 1900's.

Janan Muhammad
19
 

The Steamboat Arabia

This collection was made to pair with a learning experience during the November 17th workshop for Pittsburgh teachers working with the Smithsonian Learning Lab. Teachers will visit the Steamboat Arabia exhibit and learn from a Heinz History Center curator about the decisions made and limitations faced when creating an exhibit for visitors to learn from.

Both the online collection and the Heinz History Center exhibit explore the question "How do new innovations in transportation affect American life?"

The collection below contains artifacts and images from the Smithsonian collection that might help students and teachers respond to the question above. Suggested scaffolding questions might include:

  • Identify the changes in technology and transportation that occurred between 1800-1850.
  • How did these new transportation systems impact the movement and interactions of groups of people, the expansion of trade, and cultural life on the frontier?
  • How do the items in this collection compare to what was found during the recovery of the Steamboat Arabia?
Kate Harris
22
 

The Story of Aloha

A collection of objects personalized by Kristina Ottwell. This collection contains physical items that are far more meaningful than they may seem. Each of these objects come from a different time in her life, giving her comfort and gratification when she needed it most. The ipu, wedding band, and x2 pin are all held very close to her heart. Together these objects symbolize how far Kristina has come in life.


Ottwell, Kristina. Personal Interview. 2 March 2019.

Abigail Ottwell
3
 

The Story of America in the Holocaust


Through this curation, one can see a clear story path. It all begins with the struggles that started in Europe that forced these refugees to attempt to flee to asylum. Getting to America, for those trying to escape, was a very difficult feat due to new legislation and American stubbornness towards immigrants. For those lucky enough to get to America, they soon discovered that this “sanctuary” held many of the same prejudice and anti semitic beliefs that were forged in Europe. Overall, this curation was made to track the struggles of Jews through all stages in their journey to America.

MADDIE YP
16
 

The Struggle Between Law Enforcement and African Americans

Ever since African Americans have step foot in America it has been a trial. They have been beaten psychically, abused verbally, and isolated socially. This journal touches on a matter that til this the day the conflict is still unsolved. This journal will view the struggles between Law Enforcement and the African American community. 

Peter Mensah
14
 

The Struggle Between Law Enforcement and African Americans

Ever since African Americans have step foot in America it has been a trial. They have been beaten psychically, abused verbally, and isolated socially. This journal touches on a matter that til this the day the conflict is still unsolved. This journal will view the struggles between Law Enforcement and the African American community. 

destiny gaskins
14
 

The Struggle Between Mental Health and The African American Race

Throughout society African Americans have been ostracized from society and deprived of many opportunities. The reason that this is happening is because society or in other words "White America" have placed the stigma on the African American race that they are not mentally inclined for such things. This Journal views the struggles that African Americans endure of this alleged stigma.

Kelvin Gibbs Jr
9
 

The Stuff of Stories (Using Museums to Inspire Student Writing)

In this 1994 issue of Art to Zoo, students tap into the tales stored in museums.
Teachers find ideas for using museums and other community resources as
springboards for student writing. Click the PDF icon to download.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
3
 

The Subway

Artworks, photographs, and other documents relating to the New York subway system.
Suzanne Dempsey
8
 

The Subway

Artworks, photographs, and other documents relating to the New York subway system.
Phoebe Hillemann
8
5377-5400 of 6,303 Collections