Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(1,035)
(5,304)
(5,438)
(3,968)
(6,037)
(68)
(2,157)
(1,569)
(675)
(2,813)
(1,078)
(955)

Found 6,339 Collections

 

The Museum Idea

Museums and galleries play an important role in society. They preserve the past, enrich the present, and inspire the future. In this lesson, students will take a close look at museums, why they exist, and what the people who work in them do. By the end of the lesson, student's will create their own "Museum of Me." 

This lesson was inspired by an issue of Smithsonian's Art to Zoo and includes Minecraft: Education Edition extensions. It is part of the  2017 Museum Day Live! STEM Challenge

DOWNLOAD THE PDF TO COMPLETE THIS LESSON.

Museum Day Live!
10
 

The Museum Idea

This 1978 issue of Art to Zoo features a lesson plan in
which each student creates a "Museum of Me." The entire
class creates a curriculum-based exhibition.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
2
 

The Museum Idea


This 1976 issue of Art to Zoo offers ideas for activities before a classroom visit to a museum.
Included is a student chart on museum careers and tips on introducing students to abstract art.
Click the PDF icon to download.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
5
 

The Music in Poetry

Lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom introduce students to the rhythms of poetry. The focus is on two poetic forms that originated as forms of song: the ballad stanza, found throughout British and American literature, and the blues stanzas of Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes. Poetry is put into terms of movement, physical space, and, finally, music.

Click the PDF icon to download the issue. Click on the boxes (then click again on "View original") for audio samples of ballads and blues from the Smithsonian Folkways archives.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
6
 

The music we help people hear

Music is not what we hear oh what we help others to hear.

Anthony Johnson
18
 

The National Numismatic Collection's East Asian Currency Highlights

Established in the mid-19th century, several of the earliest additions to the NNC were artifacts from Japan, Korea, and China, including coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant from Japanese Emperor Meiji (received in 1881) and the 2,025 East Asian coins, amulets, and notes from George Bunker Glover’s private collection (received in 1897). These donations were the foundation of the NNC’s East Asian holdings, which continues to grow with new acquisitions, such as the Howard F. Bowker collection in 2017. 

Emily Pearce Seigerman
94
 

The Native American Struggle for Treaty Rights and Tribal Sovereignty

This collection serves as a preview for the sixth (final) of six seminar sessions in the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.”

National Museum of American Indian colleagues Mark Hirsch, David Penney, and Colleen Call Smith will explore the past, present, and future of treaties between the United States and Native nations, and show how American Indians have drawn on these 18th- and 19th -century agreements to defend tribal rights and exercise political sovereignty in the 20th and 21st centuries.  They will also discuss their efforts to integrate the exhibition's main themes and messages into the museum’s “Native Knowledge 360°” initiative, a national educational program designed to change the way American Indian histories, cultures, and contemporary lives are taught in K-12 classrooms.

Resources included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

The nature of Japanese Ceramic

Description:

This collection, based of the exhibition "Imperfectly Beautiful: Inventing Japanese Ceramic Style" is integrated in a unit on Francis Ponge’s collection of poems called The nature of things, 1942, France. In his poems, Ponge has a unique way of focusing on everyday life objects and symbols that he describes in very tiny details. The goal is to explore how Ponge’s perception of objects and symbols can be used as an entry point for an exploration of key components of other cultures. This collection is an opportunity for the students to understand how micro perspectives can lead to global and intercultural understanding.

The collection represents tea pots used for the Japanese tea ceremony (chanoyu). Through slow looking techniques, students explore them and write poems using the thinking routine "Creative Comparison".

Step 1: choose one of the tea pot and sketch it

Step 2: Pair and Share - Explain your choice. What did you notice? what do you notice in your classmate's choice/object?

Step 3: Creative Comparison

The thinking routine " Creative comparison" encourages metaphorical thinking – central to the work of any artist and to creative thinking in any discipline. Metaphors provoke our imaginations to create comparisons between dissimilar things, often leading to deeper and richer understanding of each." (PZ)

Step 4: Pair and Share (with someone else) - Explain your choice. What did you notice? what do you notice in your classmate's choice/object?

Step 5 : read the description of the exhibition and the caption. Answer the questions: 

  • In what way this new information influences your interpretation? 
  • What does it confirm? What new ideas do you have? 
  • What could you do to integrate them in your poem?

Step 6 : write a poem, using Francis Ponge's approach to objects.

Possible extension:

Ask the students to reflect on ways to curate their poems, using the thinking routine "Layers".

For instance, my students decided to do a a pop-up exhibition. They turned their poems into bilingual bookmarks for the school fair. It was a good opportunity for us to talk about translation.


Anne Leflot
36
 

The Nell and Phil Soto Papers

Nell and Phil felt the call to serve their country at a young age. During World War II, Phil was a bombardier in the US Army Air Corps and Nell worked at a factory that made bomb crates. It was at this factory that Nell and Phil met. They married in 1949 and reared six children.
 
Nell (1926–2009) was among the first Latina/o legislators to champion environmental causes. During her term on the Pomona City Council, from 1987 to 1998, she was appointed to the board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. In 1998, at the age of seventy-two, she was elected to the California Assembly, representing the 61st District. Two years later Nell successfully ran to represent the 32nd District in the California Senate, where she was instrumental in the passage of legislation that improved the quality of drinking water. She returned to the Assembly in 2006, after serving two terms.
 
Philip L. Soto (1926–1997) served on the La Puente City Council before being elected in 1962 to represent the 50th District in the California Assembly, a seat he held for two terms. He was one of the first Latinos elected to the legislature since the state’s early days. An activist for civil and labor rights, he marched with César Chávez from Delano to Sacramento in 1966 to protest the treatment of farm workers. Phil was also active in national politics, serving as campaign manager for La Puente during John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign and as an advisor for the presidential campaign of Robert F. Kennedy.
 
The Sotos were trailblazers throughout their careers. They pushed forward policies and legislation that put community first by focusing on better and safer education, cleaner air and water, better transportation, fair and equal housing, and green spaces and parks for children. Family, Community, Country: The Nell and Phil Soto Story highlights the couple’s work in the state legislature, their contributions to the Kennedy campaigns, their involvement with civil rights activism in the 1970s, and family and community life. The exhibition draws from the Nell and Phil Soto Papers, recently donated to the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center.

#latinoHAC #repatriation #unconstitutionaldeportation #massexpulsion

UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
5
 

The New Rise of Chinese History and Modern Technology

This collection compares the hardship of Chinese American history as Chinese Americans are fighting for their cultural equality. It also highlights the new enlightenment of modern technologies as it trying to blend into the society today.

Jeff Lin
18
 

The Nez Perce War

Idaho State Museum
15
 

The NHD @ NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2017: Taking a Stand in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2017 NHD Theme!

Below are some objects and videos to help you explore the 2017 NHD theme: Taking a Stand in History. These objects will help you consider the perspective of the African American experience in history.

These objects may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections and/or the hotspots to reveal object questions to spark your curiosity.

The artifact questions should encourage viewers to think and explore the history of the object or video on their own!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
46
 

The NHD at NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2018: Conflict and Compromise in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2018 NHD Theme!

Below are some documents, images, objects and videos to help you explore the 2018 NHD theme: Conflict and Compromise in History. These documents, images, objects and videos are intended to help highlight the African American experience and perspective in American and international history.

These documents, images, objects and videos may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections, questions to help with analysis, creative activities,  and/or the paper clip icon to reveal questions or comments to spark your curiosity.

#NHD2018 #NHD

National Museum of African American History and Culture
75
 

The Nuclear Arms Race and its Contribution to the Cold War

The Nuclear Arms Race became on of the primary factors surmounting throughout the entire Cold War. When the United States invented and detonated the Atomic Bomb over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Stalin then immediately ordered his scientists to create him a bomb with as much power or even more than that of the United States. Stalin then gave his famous Bolshoi speech, openly declaring that the secrecy of the United States towards Russia was the direct cause of the Cold War and the beginning of the Nuclear Arms Race began.

NIcholai Balkovec
5
 

The Odyssey

Rebecca Marks
27
 

The Olympics and the Cold War

This learner resource includes artifacts and archival documents regarding the 1980, 1984, and 1988 Olympics. Students will explore these materials in order to develop an understanding of how the Olympics were used as a platform for the United States and the Soviet Union to display political ideals during the Cold War. Comprehension and analysis questions are embedded throughout.

Tags: Wilson Center, Cold War, Olympics, hockey, Miracle on Ice, boycott, Afghanistan, Soviet Union, USSR, Communism
Kate Harris
10
 

The Past in the Present

April 8, 2017

9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

When navigating the reality of today and seeking to shape their futures, your students may not see the power of the past at work in their lives. As the educators of tomorrow's voters, leaders, and citizens, you know that history can serve as a roadmap and a cautionary tale. Explore the Museum's contemporary art galleries with the senior curator of contemporary interpretation to uncover the history hiding in contemporary art. Participate in activities that challenge you (and your students) to internalize the past, trace its ripples to the present, and take informed action toward change for the future.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
27
 

The Path of Miracles - Digital Storytelling

Join me as I travel through time to hear first-person accounts of unexplainable miracles occurring in the natural world. 

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling 


Kayla Goodman
10
 

The Path to the Diving Helmet

Some inventions are said to be ahead of their time, and some behind their time; but most inventions arise as a result of present needs, or as a result of a new development that enables an existing idea to be produced.

Think of the example of space travel.  Space travel wasn’t possible in the 1930s because the rocketry technology wasn’t available — that was only developed during the Second World War. So it was with the diving helmet; everybody knew what they wanted to do, but they couldn’t make it work until the materials and technology became available.

Key words: Diving, diving helmet, Deane helmet, James helmet, Halley helmet, diving hoses, diving pumps, Diving Museum, Gosport, England.

the_diving_museum
15
 

The Pathfinding Flights

Shortly after the Post Office gained full control of the airmail service and the route from Washington to New York via Philadelphia, officials began planning their next steps. Second Assistant Otto Praeger announced their intention to create an airmail connection between the nation's two top financial centers, New York and Chicago.Linking New York and Chicago, the nation's major financial centers, would help prove the service's worth to Congress, which held the Post Office Department's purse-strings.But first they had to figure out the best route between the cities.

Praeger and Lipsner, Superintendent of the Airmail Service, chose two of their pilots, Max Miller and Eddie Gardner, for the task of finding the best way over the Allegheny Mountains and to Chicago. The pair left New York on the same day, but in different aircraft. Their goal - make it all the way to Chicago in a single day. Anything less would put airmail on the same timetable as trains, and not worth the money in Congress' opinion.


Nancy Pope
23
 

The Pathfinding Flights

Shortly after the Post Office gained full control of the airmail service and the route from Washington to New York via Philadelphia, officials began planning their next steps. Second Assistant Otto Praeger announced their intention to create an airmail connection between the nation's two top financial centers, New York and Chicago.Linking New York and Chicago, the nation's major financial centers, would help prove the service's worth to Congress, which held the Post Office Department's purse-strings.But first they had to figure out the best route between the cities.

Praeger and Lipsner, Superintendent of the Airmail Service, chose two of their pilots, Max Miller and Eddie Gardner, for the task of finding the best way over the Allegheny Mountains and to Chicago. The pair left New York on the same day, but in different aircraft. Their goal - make it all the way to Chicago in a single day. Anything less would put airmail on the same timetable as trains, and not worth the money in Congress' opinion.


Hpvl Depot
23
 

The Pittsburgh Survey

This topical collection contains resources related to the Pittsburgh Survey, a groundbreaking Progressive Era research study of the living and working conditions in turn-of-the-century Pittsburgh. This study, published in books and magazines, led to the passage of worker-safety laws and encouraged other Progressive Era reforms. The images, readings, and links to archival materials in this collection can be used to support exploration of the questions below.

Guiding Questions:

  • In what way did the Pittsburgh Survey reflect Progressive Era concerns, strategies, and achievements?
  • How did Progressive Era beliefs about social change differ from those held previously?

Tags: Progressives, child labor, worker safety, scientific management, muckrakers, reform movement, Lewis Hine, Paul Kellogg, Crystal Eastman. Joseph Stella, Homestead, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Kate Harris
13
 

The Plantation South

This collection will examine the Plantation South and the Cotton kingdom.

Thomas Gray
7
 

The poetry of "Frankenstein" (Beyond "Rime of the Ancient Mariner")

Chapters 9, 10, and 18 in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, feature some of the most detailed descriptions of Europe's natural wonders - - Mont Blanc, the Swiss Alps, and even scenic waterways such as the Rhine and the Thames. Quite often, Mary Shelley blends such scenery with poetic "asides" - works beyond the heavy intertextuality associated with  Rime of the Ancient Mariner  and Paradise Lost . Shelley's poetic language describing nature's majesty, coupled with stanzas borrowed from Tintern Abbey and Mutibility, can be used to inspire students' own poetry.

#SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
13
5305-5328 of 6,339 Collections