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Found 6,091 Collections

 

Inspiration: Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome in Our Nation's Capital

In this collection, students will work with images of buildings from ancient Greece and ancient Rome along with images of iconic buildings in Washington, D.C. to identify ways that early Americans were inspired by ancient Greeks and Romans. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
7
 

Symbols: Using Images to Invoke Feelings

In this collection, students will work with Americana images to do a "close view" that will allow them to make inferences about which feelings did the artists intend to invoke by using symbols. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
9
 

Making the Old New: Rethinking Monuments and Memorials

In this collection, students will work with images, videos, and texts related to Marta Minujín's "Parthenon of Books" to create a series of questions that a creator must ask and answer before designing a memorial or monument. #LearnWithTR

Nicole Clark
8
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

Food! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing food. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

Biodiversity! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing biodiversity. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast. 

#YAGSidedoor2019

Sidedoor for Educators
7
 

Pocahontas: The American Myth

In this collection students will explore the American Myth of Pocahontas. They will analyze the way the myth is often told in media today and some of the often contradictory truths that historians and anthropologists have discovered.

Guiding Question: What do we really know about Jamestown and how do we know it?

#learnwithTR

Elizabeth Weiss
11
 

Music and the Other Arts: Expressionism and Minimalism as Examples

The National Association for Music Education Composition/ Theory Connect #11 standard asks: Demonstrate an understanding of
relationships between music and the
other arts. One entree into the subject is to consider the correspondences of artistic move-
ments in very different art forms. For example: Just as there was an early-twentieth-century movement in painting called
Expressionism and a late-twentieth-century movement in painting called Minimalism, so there was Expressionist music and then
Minimalist music. For ideas on considering the music in light of the Expressionist and Minimalist paintings below, see READ MORE
or click the text box to the right of the rightmost picture. 


What is Expressionism?

The term Expressionism is as old as the twentieth century: in English, the first recorded use dates to 1901. Twentieth-century Expressionist artists, then, were aware that they were creating Expressionist works. The term refers to expressions of emotion, rather than expressions of ideas. Expressionist art is therefore marked by extreme subjectivity.

Expressionism in painting is represented here by Russian-born Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944) in his 1922 Composition, in the Hirshhorn Museum. Kandinsky is credited with being first in a form that did not yet have a name: Abstract Expressionism. While other Expressionist painters gave a subjective cast to the recognizable world—with unnatural colors, perhaps, or exaggerated shapes—Kandinsky freed himself from the recognizable world entirely.

Expressionism in music is represented by Kandinsky's Austrian-born friend and frequent correspondent Arnold Schoenberg (1874–1951), Like Kandinsky, Schoenberg brought to his art a new concept that required a new name: atonal music, which dispensed with a key principle of western music.

Traditional western music places primary importance on the tonic, or tonal center, of the eight-note diatonic scale, with all other notes relating to that center. Schoenberg instead gave equal importance to all twelve half steps of the chromatic scale. The traditional progression of music is a venturing out from the tonic and a return home to the tonic. In atonal music, there is no place to go home to.

Fellow composer Ernst Bloch observed that Schoenberg's new system was guided only by “Expressionslogik,” or “logic of expression.”  The 1908 String Quartet No 2.  is one of the earliest examples. (Follow the link to a public-domain recording of the fourth movement, by the Carmel String Quartet.)      

What is Minimalism?  

Though the term Minimalism dates to the 1920s, it usually refers to a style that came to prominence in the 1960s. The term means just what it looks like: art achieved with a minimum of detail. Minimalism in painting is represented by the 1962 Line Up by American artist Frank Stella (b. 1936), also in the Hirshhorn. It is one of the first in a series of Stella's works made up only of stripes of color, all of equal width.

Minimalism in music is represented by the repeated spare melodies and gradual modulations of the American Steve Reich (b. 1936). A half minute of Reich' s 1989 Electric Counterpoint is in the public domain. It is performed by jazz guitarist Pat Metheny.

Minimalism vis-à-vis Expressionism

Minimalism might be viewed as a natural development of Expressionism. For instance: Just as Kandinsky stripped representation from emotion and left only an abstraction, Stella stripped as much as possible from abstraction, including emotion.

But therein lies a great difference. Much of Minimalism is marked not by personal expression but by impersonal detachment. Stella said of his work: "What you see is what you see." In other words: Don't look for meaning in the stripes of color. They are only stripes of color.   

IDEA FOR AN ACTIVITY

After listening to the examples of Expressionist and Minimalist music (Schoenberg and Reich), show the Expressionist and Minimalist paintings (Kandinsky and Stella), without identifying anything by artistic school. Pose a question that might lead to many various answers and many more questions:

Which painting looks most like which piece of music?

If the students are musicians, ask if they can identify a tonic (a center) anywhere in the Schoenberg piece.

With all students, ask if they can find traditional organization in the Kandinsky painting. Is there perspective (for depth) to the shapes? Or do the shapes seem to exist on the same plane? Is there balance between the two halves of the painting?

In short: Can you find a center to this picture?

Of Stella's Line Up, consider: Does the painter seem to feel strongly about this pattern of color?  Of the Reich piece: Does the composer seem to feel strongly about this pattern of music?

Back to Representation

It's possible that students will immediately identify Reich's music with Stella's painting by the regularity of pattern in each, but find much more emotional content in Reich's pattern. Teachers with enough years behind them may be reminded of the train music in the 1983 Tom Cruise movie Risky Business, by the electronic band Tangerine Dream. It is not a coincidence. Though Risky Business preceded Electric Counterpoint by six years, Tangerine Dream took inspiration from earlier Reich. The counterpoint in Electric Counterpoint refers to another Reich composition, Different Trains. If students perceive representation here (the locomotion of a train) it seems they are on safe ground.

Different Trains was based on reflections on his childhood during World War II. At that time, he was taken on many train journeys between New York and Los Angeles. It occurred to him later that if he had been born in Europe, he may have been taken on a Holocaust train. Both kinds of trains are represented in the work, which leads to a question:

In Electric Counterpoint, is this a train of adventure or a train of tragedy?

LINK TO LITERATURE

Listeners have heard a common pattern in Reich's work, ABBA, which can go by a name used almost exclusively for literature and rhetoric: chiasmus. A chiasmus is a statement in which a first topic (A) is followed by a different topic (B), and then a repeat of that second topic (B), and then a repeat of the first (A).

The most common example is the witches' first choral statement in Macbeth:

Fair is foul, and foul is fair.

FAIR (A) FOUL (B) FOUL (B) FAIR (A). 

That statement is more specifically an antimetabole, meaning that exact words are repeated. In a chiamus, only topics need repeat. Shakespeare has many, such as this in Richard III:

Since every Jack became a gentleman,
There's many a gentle person made a Jack.

  JACK (A) GENTLEMAN (B) GENTLE PERSON (B) JACK (A).

The Bible has many more, such as these from the King James Version:

The last shall be first, and the first last.

And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. (Which is an ABBAA.)

If students are musicians, ask if they can hear a pattern in Electric Counterpoint that can be identified with A's and B's, a chiasmus or something else.


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
3
 

Design with Empathy: Tova Kleiner Case Study

This Learning Lab explores Tova Kleiner's winning entry to the 2017 National High School Design Competition. Students were challenged to design a solution that improves a community's access to healthy, fresh foods using a Design with Empathy approach. 

While investigating this learning lab answer the following questions:
  •  Who did Tova identify as her stakeholder in this design challenge?
  • What parts of the design process are evident in this learning lab collection?
  • Was Tova’s final design a product, service, environment or a combination?
  • Describe the varying parts of Tova’s design solution: what does the end user receive?
  • How did the other example (the fresh food mobile market) tackle the same design problem in a different way? 

Be prepared to share your answers with the class!





Jasmine Kassulke
15
 

"¡Pleibol!”: Close Looking to Explore One Family’s Story of Latino Baseball

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by using three Thinking Routines to explore the cultural relevance of one family's baseball-related objects from an exhibition at the National Museum of American History, "¡Pleibol!: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues." The exhibition seeks to document the history of Latino culture through the lens of baseball, and explores baseball not only as a pastime close to the hearts of many people in many communities, but also for Latinos as a place to advocate for rights and social justice. 

Finally, the prompts aid students in looking closely at a personal object of their choice and teasing out the story it tells.

Included here are the objects themselves, a bilingual video with curator Margaret Salazar-Porzio, three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "The 3 Y's," and "Picture Writing" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the exhibition. 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies



Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Interpreting Early American Portraiture through Pocahontas

This lesson is to be completed in the final days of our Early American literature unit.  Students have been tasked with creating an "Early High School Journal" to mimic the different styles of readings we have completed.  The final task of the journal will be to create an author's portrait page based on the tone and characters they have adopted for their project. 

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
7
 

Analyzing Character and Motivation in the Crucible

This activity will be completed at the end of The Crucible before watching the documentary Central Park Five about a modern day witch hunt.  By completing the puzzle activity with an image from the Salem Witch Trials, the McCarthy Hearings, and the Central Park Five Court Case, students will find the common characters and motivations for which to focus in on the film.  Their culminating task will be to jump into the portrait and write a letter home to their parents, sibling, or best friend.  They will then be tasked with doing the same task each of the three days of the documentary.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
7
 

Grace Hopper & The First Computer Bug

A collection about Grace Hopper to use with teaching about historic and inspiring women figures in Computer Science. 

macbetthh
6
 

Buoyancy

Betty Jo Moore
1
 

Modernizing Revolutionary Literature with the Founding Fathers

This lesson would be completed at the end of our revolutionary literature unit.  This will ask the students to physically pose as the founding fathers, view the descendants' commercial, study the descendants' portrait, view an interview about the commercial, and then finally draft a letter to the founding fathers updating them on their work.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
8
 

History and Portraiture: Utilizing Art to Teach American History, Colonial America to the Civil War

This Learning Lab contains a five unit curriculum that puts students in conversation with a diverse group of significant Americans from the colonial era to the present. Lessons on the Elements of Portrayal, Symbols, Labels, Letter Writing, and Portrait Pairing prompt students to analyze the lasting impact of remarkable individuals from the Portrait Gallery’s collection. This collection was originally created in collaboration with Alice Deal Middle School in Washington D.C. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
84
 

¡Cuentos!

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Recommended for children between the ages of 3 and 7, this delightful Discovery Theater original offers a fresh take on three classic tales . The Little Red Hen asks the question “Who will help?” Jack and the Beanstalk proves that small is mighty. And The Gingerbread Man… well, he’s just one bad cookie. Filled with delightful songs, puppets, and audience participation, this bilingual story-time spectacular is not to be missed! 

Themes:

Jack and the Beanstalk: Our version of this classic story teaches kids about overcoming adversity and intervening on behalf of those with less power than you.

The Little Red Hen: This story teaches kids about the important of helping others!

The Gingerbread Man: This fun tale also serves as an example of not trusting someone without carefully considering what their motives might be.


Discovery Theater
32
 

Retratos: My people, Myself

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Originally created for with the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and Young Playwright’s Theater, this joyous theatrical portrait of the many faces of Latin America was written by children from D.C. schools who responded to paintings from the exhibition, Retratos: 2,000 Years of Latin American Portraits.  Student’s monologues create this warm and interactive play about how our lives are magnificent reflections of our ancestry and America’s future.  This joyous theatrical portrait of the many faces of Latin America asks students the question, "How can we ‘portray’ the richness of our heritage and still be an American child... and how are we, in our lives, a portrait of today’s world?"

Discovery Theater
66
 

Hoop of Life with Ty Defoe

With his vivid presence as a performer, Ty Defoe recounts an eloquent story of life though movement, music, and words rooted in his Oneida and Ojibwe heritage. He uses the sacred Hoop Dance to explore Native American stories framed by traditional and contemporary culture, history, and values. As the colorful interlinked hoops move, they speak of the unity and interdependence of all living things—and offer lessons for our everyday lives. Presented by Discovery Theater--a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. 

Discovery Theater
39
 

Grandma's Thanksgiving Visit

This interactive play created by Creative Tools for Teaching team is infused with pre-literacy, pre-numeracy, and inquiry-based activities. It celebrates family and the many things we are thankful for! Grandma has arrived for the holiday—and that can only mean making puppets, cooking together, washing the car, and learning lots of fun new things. This musical play with a great big heart brings the whole audience into the family with singing, finger play, and call-and response as we all give thanks for being together. Presented by Discovery Theater--a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. 

Discovery Theater
69
 

Seasons of Light

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Joy, warmth, and community illuminate seasonal holiday celebrations the world over. Back for its 20th season, this signature Discovery Theater show celebrates the history and customs of Diwali (Devali), Chanukah, Las Posadas, Ramadan, Sankta Lucia Day, Kwanzaa, Christmas, and the First Nations’ tradition of the Winter Solstice in an interactive event that bridges communities and cultures. This show sells out early, so get your tickets now!

Discovery Theater
54
 

Once Upon a Moon

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Let’s go to the moon! In this exciting, interactive show for our youngest audiences, performers and puppets spin new and old stories about the moon’s magic, introducing the magical science that brought rockets to its surface. What new worlds can we dream about next? 

Discovery Theater
66
 

Here We Go Team!

This Discovery Theatre original scores big in a musical play about sharing and taking turns, the importance of personal space, and the awesome power of teamwork.  Five-year-olds Mika and Casey are aspiring soccer stars and best friends—but they’ve ended up on separate teams! Through a mishap on the field, they discover that helping people is cool, thanks to another kind of 'team'-- of medical stars who make everyone feel great.  

Discovery Theater
54
 

ABC’s of Percussion with Uncle Devin

Uncle Devin uses different musical instruments, along with his award-winning book, “The ABC’s of Percussion with Music CD,” to help students construct and demonstrate an understanding of how the sounds made from percussion instruments were used to communicate long before the telephone, computer, email, and other modern forms of communication.  Ausiwnces connect the sounds and rhythm of percussion instruments with the three “r”s—with Uncle Devin as the guide. Presented by Discovery Theater--a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. 

Discovery Theater
42
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