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Found 6,966 Collections

 

Alcoholic Beverages in the 1700s

Throughout history alcohol is something that has been equally loved and hated, and there hasn't been a clear answer as to whether it is better or worse for society. This collection is showing the versatility of alcohol's uses prior to the mid-19th century. In this time period alcohol was consistently used as a medicine and I have included multiple variants of the medical purposes of these alcoholic beverages and mixtures. Also included in this collection is alcohol being used for medicinal purposes for the first president of the United States of America; George Washington. While the descriptions given for these pharmaceutical mixtures may not have been completely accurate they were obviously in some way effective or perceived to be so during this time period prior to major medical advancements that have been made today.

The secondary aspects of this collection features articles that include descriptions of different aspects of alcohol in society then and today. One of the examples is a chart from the 1790s that is condemning alcohol use and shows that even back in that time period many people understood that alcohol had many downsides and should be taken seriously, although depending on your perspective they were likely being a bit too strict about the use of it. Another article details a genetic feature known as the "Tipsy Gene" which is present in 10%-20% of the human population and drastically decreases the chances of alcoholism in the people that contain it. With such a small number of people that have a natural predisposition against alcoholism it is no surprise that is has been so prevalent in society up until today.


Brandon Salahuddin
10
 

Alec Backus Period 3: Terrorism

Terrorism has been a big issue for a long time. The root issue was mostly when people either wanted something from another person or group or when there religion told them so. Right now the big Terrorists are Isis but before them there were a lot of other groups over the years in many other cultures some are still at each others throats through out all these years. This problem has mostly never changed and is still going on today mostly for the same reasons.

Alec Backus
3
 

Alec Buetow: 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

To give us a look at the material items of the 1920's which helped to cause the Great Depression in the 1930's, one of the most significant events in American and the World's history, and to give us a look at the artifacts of the 1930's, one of the most important time periods.

Alec Buetow
10
 

Alex Lochmiller-1920s and 1930s Artifacts.

to review and see how the the 1920s were and how they affected our lives today

alex lochmiller
10
 

Alex Pang, A Look at the 1960s in American History

The purpose of this project is to portray American history in during the 1960s through the lens of several artifacts. It is also to show how the 1960s was one of the most eventful decades throughout American history that consisted of many unique movements and events.

Alex Pang
10
 

Alexa J.

The amazing collection here at “The μουσείο (“Museum”) of Greek History” is just Greek pieces of art and things that show the amazingness of Ancient Greece. It shows the beautiful and non-beautiful parts of Greece and to me it is quite extraordinary. 

I have always loved Greek history and art which is why I wanted to create this museum, as well as to share Greece with everyone else. When people enter the museum I want them to be blow away by the history and character of the museum. When they leave I want the guests to take with them Ancient Greece. I want them to remember the excitement of Ancient Greece.

SI Museum Makers 2019
28
 

Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War

This is a collection of photographic plates from Alexander Gardner's Civil War Sketchbook that can be used for teaching about the Civil War in a number of ways. Students can explore the collection and look for images that help them learn about one of the following themes:

1) Technology

2) Military Strategy

3) Life in Military Camps

4) Death and Destruction

5) Photography as Art and Communication

The plates are in order as they appeared in the book, although some have not been included in order to limit the size of the collection. Note that some of the images have additional information linking to external websites with lesson ideas or simply more background on the particular photograph. In addition, be aware that each plate has two images, the first showing the photograph and the second showing Gardner's caption. The three final photos are not from the sketchbook, but show some of Gardner's more famous images and reveal more about the man himself.

WARNING: Some of the images in this collection include pictures of the dead on the battlefield, which some viewers may find disturbing. Please carefully consider whether use of this collection is appropriate for your specific audience.

Kate Harris
40
 

Alexander J.

The Mewseum


I have two cats. Cats, and pets in general, in my opinion, are highly under appreciated in public spaces.

This exhibit is about this history of cats.

People take it for granted taht cats are wide-spread throughout the world, but they actually have a rich and immersive migration and development story like our own, that is woefully uncovered.


SI Museum Makers 2019
36
 

Alexander the Great

The question “Was Alexander Great?”

#TeachingInquir

Dave Montgomery
8
 

Alexander the Great


Was Alexander the Great really a "great" ruler?
This collection contains resources that will assist you in creating a historical argument to answer that question.

Julie Cam
8
 

Alexander the Great: The Greek Conqueror and Cultural Blender

The purpose of this collection is to show how the powerful leaders of greatest civilization changed the direction of existing Religion, culture, history and art as per their beliefs and a sudden transition from one period to another. Art forms were developed at different speeds in various parts of the Greek world and, as in any period, some artists had more innovative styles than others. Strong local traditions, conservative by nature, and local cultural requirements allow historians to locate the very origins of works of art. This collection is part two of three that that I have organized, chronologically, on Akhenaton: The Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution. The other two collections are "Alexander the Great: The Greek Conqueror and Cultural blender" and Octavian Augustus: The Roman Emperor "The illustrious one". It is my hope that these collections will help viewers to understand influential power of world’s ancient leaders in the field of Art and Culture.

Alexander came to love the arts and greatly appreciates Homeric poetry. He always has with him a copy of Homer's epic poems and dreams of imitating the exploits of his heroes, Achilles and Heracles, and of living like them.

Alexander's conquests have created an immense empire, and its impact on the world stage is still the subject of discussion among historians. Politically, it was the end of Alexander's empire, and culturally, the achievements of the latter introduced the Hellenistic era. The historians who criticize Alexander see him as short-sighted and claim that he only sought to cover himself with glory for his military exploits, while deploring the fact that there were no other worlds to conquer. According to the Roman emperor Augustus, Alexander should have been more satisfied with his role as leader than that of conqueror. Admirers say he has paved the way for the definition of a new political order. Others now had to carry out what he undertook.

Alexander seemed to believe in this Hellenization of the world, in this possibility of making all men live under the same law of reason, a conception which his former tutor Aristotle would have criticized in a lost work, entitled Alexander or the Colonies, considering that a difference of Nature separates forever the Greeks, destined to live free under political institutions, Barbarians devoted to despotism and servitude.

Alexander made the fusion of nationalities both the means and the goal of his work of colonization. In the space of ten years, a whole world had been discovered and conquered; the barriers which separated the East from the West had fallen, and the roads which were henceforth to communicate the countries of the east and west were open.

This development often took place in a rather brutal manner, and often produced degeneration in which the glance of history, which embraces all the ages, can alone discover the latent and powerful thrust of progress.

For Hellenic art, he gained nothing to exaggerate the calm grandeur of harmonic proportions to accommodate the Asian taste, the sumptuous display of colossal masses, to want to surpass the idealism of his spontaneous works by the luxury of materials precious and realistic pleasure of the eyes.

The dark magnificence of the Egyptian temples, the fantastic buildings of the castle and the rooms of Persepolis , the gigantic ruins of Babylon, the Hindu buildings with their serpent-shaped idols and their elephants squatting under the columns, all this, mixed with the traditions of national art, no doubt opened a rich treasure of new ideas and ideas for Hellenic artists. Alexander’s conquests generated a great cultural diffusion and syncretism, promoting the development of things such as Greco-Buddhism. Also, his habit of creating Greek colonies helped spread Greek culture in the east, sometimes with long-lasting impacts. As late as the 1920s, there were communities of Greek speakers in far eastern Anatolia.

#AHMC2019


Ju Young Lee
13
 

Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg's The Substitute

On March 19, 2018, the last male northern white rhino, Sudan, died, bringing his subspecies to the brink of extinction. As scientists work to resurrect the rhino through experimental and controversial biotechnologies, Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg “brings back to life” a male northern white rhino using data generated by artificial intelligence to ask the question “what errors in reproduction may arise as we recreate life artificially?” As it habituates to its environment, the rhino’s form and sound toggle from pixelated to lifelike—reminding us that this rhino, coming to life without its natural context, is entirely artificial.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
10
 

Algebra and Precalculs

Items and resources for courses prior to calculus. In particular, conics and logs are highlighted.

#MCteach

Amy Shell-Gellasch
9
 

Alice Ivashina

Design Prep Work

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
16
 

Alice Paul

William Grosso
4
 

Aliens and How Close We've Come

A collection that focuses on what information has been collected on aliens, our contact with them directly or indirectly, how far we've come in our theories about them, how close we are to them, or if they even exist.

Caigea Milfort
27
 

Alison Bechdel

Lehrer's multi-media portrait of acclaimed cartoonist and graphic novelist , Alison Bechdel, is an engaging image. I envision that it could help facilitate a lively discussion and inspire an exploration of self-identity with students at the secondary level in the visual as well as the language arts.

Riva Lehrer's interest in figuration and portraiture stems from living with a visible and significant disability. "Being stared at, and looking back, has colored my work for twenty years. Most of my collaborators have been people with impairments, visible or not. Some have no impairments but qualify for other reasons. We start with long interviews, in order to get a strong narrative sense of the relationship between their body and their life." Lehrer started this portrait of graphic novelist Alison Bechdel while Bechdel was working on Are You My Mother, a follow-up to her memoir, Fun Home. Bechdel provided a full-scale drawing of her mother, which Lehrer then transferred onto paper with blue acrylic. Lehrer says the portrait "grew out of discussions about being haunted by a lost parent, and [the awareness] that one's mother is the ultimate mirror of the self for a daughter."

Alison Bechdel (the sitter)
Riva Lehrer (the artist)
Chicago, IL
2011
Charcoal, mixed media, and 3-D collage on paper
Sandy Hindin Stone
Tammy French
1
 

All About Opera

What is Opera? When did it begin? Where did it originate?
Melanie Haynes
16
 

All Access Digital Arts Camp (plans and activities for teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities)

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens.

Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill-building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections.

At the Access Summer Camp workshops, teens learn to tell their own stories through digital arts and media. They focused on a specific story to tell based upon their interests. Content for their artistic self-expressions took the form of printed digital portraits and “sonic self-portrait” digital music compositions, as well as documentary iMovies. Teens toured Smithsonian museums, visited exhibitions and interviewed curators and educators, as well as conducted internet research. Teens ate lunch together and socialized during game breaks. Volunteers worked with teens to provide individual supports and facilitate the experience. Smithsonian educators and neurotypical teen youth mentors guided Access teens to edit their content using photo, sound, and movie editing software.   The movies, portraits, and songs premiered at the Hirshhorn Museum’s ARTLAB+ for family and friends, with teens themselves providing introductory remarks for their artworks. Each teen received a certificate of completion, a digital copy of their artwork, and a framed self-portrait. An evaluation session on the final day of the workshops allowed teens to express their thoughts to the workshop organizers. 

Tracie Spinale
3
 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 
 

All That Jazz: An Introduction

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about jazz, read articles about Jazz, and listen to the read aloud Rent Party Jazz. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
457-480 of 6,966 Collections