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Found 497 Collections

 

Steel Town: The Story of Homestead

This curriculum pack was produced by the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania and includes everything you need to teach about the town of Homestead and how it reflects changes in American society. The student text includes readings that you can give directly to your students, and the info tab includes suggested teaching activities. Primary sources and biographies with suggested activities are also included (be sure to click on the paper clip and/or info icon on each item to find out more about it). 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
30
 

​Native Americans and Manifest Destiny

A collection of images focusing on the Native Americans and their vanishing cultures due to Manifest Destiny.

Lesson Concept

Travis Meserve

Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green, KY

Grade levels: 9-12

11th grade American Literature Focus for English Second Language Learners

Lesson Time: 50 minutes

Procedure:

1.  Show the students a copy of the painting “Westward the Course of Empire Makes Its Way” by Emanuel Leutze (1861). Ask the students to spend a few moments observing the work in silence, noticing any details that draw their eyes.  Ask the students to let their eyes touch every part of the canvas/picture.

2. Using the teaching strategy “See Think Wonder” ask the students to volunteer details in the work that they see.  Ask them to describe only what they observe in the work (e.g. “I see a man in a fur hat holding a gun”). After the student makes a factual observation, ask the student “What do you see that makes you say that?” if the student says something that is not immediately obvious (e.g. the student sees a wooden sailing ship trapped in sea ice but describes it as a cabin).  Do not correct the student.  Let other students make observations and possibly correct each other through observation and discussion.  After the student is satisfied with an observation, follow up with the question “What do you think about that?” Allow the student to offer any interpretations of what the detail means for the content of the work, the tone, the theme etc.  Avoiding any value judgements, summarize back to the student his or her interpretation and evidential observations supplying any vocabulary the student might lack, asking for the student’s approval of the final summary. Continue this procedure until the students exhaust their observations or the class time restraints are reached.  Finally, follow up with the question “What does this work (or specific observation) make you wonder about?”

3. At this point, ask the students to note anything that they do not see but would expect to be represented in the scene.  Second Language Learners who have been in the USA for 2-3 years would probably have some general ideas about the history of the USA and may be able to offer such absences.  If not, the teacher may need to point out that no Native Americans appear in the main scene.  If the students do not notice the border of the work, point out that there are small scenes in the border that add content/connections to the main scene. Point out that two Native Americans appear there, small and crawling.

4. Ask the students to make a journal entry writing their thoughts about the work, specifically noting the Americans who are represented as moving across the land and the Americans who are not represented.

Extensions:

  1. If the students have enough command of the language, the teacher can discuss representing fact versus propaganda.  Discuss the painting as advertisement for the movement west despite its factual inaccuracies (e.g. the painting depicts California as visible from the Rocky Mountains although it is actually 1,200 miles away).  Contrast this with a handbill distributed in the Dust Bowl areas advertising workers needed in California to pick crops (in reality the number of workers was greater than the jobs available). A possible literary connection could be to The Grapes of Wrath.

  2. Use the painting periodically through the course of American Literature.  Students’ reactions to the work may evolve as they expand their ideas of American history, manifest destiny, and the immigrant experience.  Allow students to write new journal entries each time they revisit the work with new knowledge.  Discuss the dialogue that gets created between the artist, the work, and the viewer based on what the viewer brings to the experience.

Purpose

Objective: The student will be able to make a factual observation about the painting and offer interpretation (where possible) citing evidence from the work.

Follow-up lessons: On subsequent viewing of the work, the student will be able to identify themes in the painting that connect to texts from American Literature (e.g. attitude toward nature, the west, immigration, manifest destiny, etc.)

Rationale for using this artwork: The painting by Leutze encapsulates many themes that permeate American Literature and lends itself to an introduction to the course as well as an anchor for the course that will bear repeated viewing.

Rationale for the the methodology: The English as a Second Language student often does not bring a lot of background knowledge about American history or art.  The See-Think-Wonder technique allows the student to engage with the work as an expert would: one who makes observations and interpretations that allow claims backed by evidence.

Skills:

Differentiating Observation (fact) from Interpretation (opinion).

Making claims based on evidence.

Practice speaking in front of peers using the target language of English.

#SAAMteach


Travis Meserve
28
 

Braceros - Using Paintings and Photos to Analyze Mexican Immigrant Labor

This lesson will teach students about the bracero guest worker program, as well as painting, photograph, and textual analysis.  Students will use the Domingo Ulloa painting as a jumping off point for an analysis of working and living conditions of migrant Mexican workers in the United States.  Photographs from the American history collection will show workers's lives in America, while a primary source will show the effects of the bracero program on an individual.  Finally, students will connect the bracero program of 1942-1964 to immigration issues of today by analyzing statements made by Donald Trump in the context of the bracero program.

Daniel Sawyer
26
 

Arguments to meditate: an introduction through American Art

This collection is for use with an introductory lesson for a 12th-grade rhetoric course's unit on "arguments to meditate," which are defined in the text "Everything's an Argument" by Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszkiewicz as, to paraphrase, those arguments which are abstract and/or which lack a clear, explicitly stated thesis and that therefore depend on thoughtful meditation by the audience to arrive at an understanding of the rhetorician's intent. The purpose of this lesson is to (1) establish students' understanding of the definition of an argument to meditate and (2) provide students with a beginning ability to assess the thesis and supporting ideas that comprise arguments to meditate in the form of American Art. The details of the lesson itself are included in a document within the collection.

#SAAMteach

Marshall Harris
10
 

Self-Portrait - Katie O'Hagan

This collection is designed to help students learn and understand the idea, artistic approach, decision making and creative processes that come to play when one creates a self-portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

TAGS: #NPGteach, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery, self-portrait, portrait, figurative painting

Elena Murphy
8
 

Anna May Wong

Movie Star

A complementary collection of extension activities is available here: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/anna-may-wong-extension-activities/Eo4txiDzJnf8arqN#r

NPG Final Project July 2017

mae
1
 

Summer Teacher Institute

Shirley Chisholm's 1972 presidential campaign poster and paraphernalia

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

#portrait

#learningtolook

#NationalPortraitGallery

Timothy Wilson
8
 

Feminist History

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to look Summer Teacher Institute. The activities, which should take 1 hour over two class days, use two photographs for student visual analysis, as well as a short reading on feminist history, to help students investigate context to further their understanding of characterization, theme, and plot elements in Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.  A page of teacher notes is included at the end of the collection, outlining suggested uses of the slides.


TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery

Davina Smith
6
 

Social Justice: National Portrait Gallery Resources

This collection previews the fifth and final seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, The Struggle for Justice. Two National Portrait Gallery staff members will lead this event: David Ward and Briana Zavadil White.

Resources and questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore and consider before the seminar itself.

#MCSI

David Bedar
24
 

Golden Age of Athens

This was a period of Athenian political power, economic growth and cultural flourishing formerly known as the Golden Age of Athens with the later part The Age of Pericles.

THEODORA CHIOTI
12
 

E-Textiles

This teaching collection gives an introduction to e-textiles, which incorporates sewing with circuitry. Students will first learn the basics LED circuitry, then create their very own wearable tech. Extension activities include creating paper circuits with magnetic copper tape and magnetic "throwies".



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
13
 

Activity Collection: 3D Modeling Bugs!

Go through the character sketches and renders from the animated feature "Bugs!" and guess what personalities the characters portray based on pose, shape, and expression. Then, using scientific illustrations from the National Museum of Natural History as reference, create your very own insect character in the Sculptris software.


This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
20
 

Quilt Quest

Did you know that quilts are also historical artifacts? Use this collection to learn more about how curators investigate quilts to learn about their origins, and then explore a variety of different quilts that tell us important things about the time in which they were made and the crafters who made them. Finally, make your own quilt depicting an important historical moment.

tags: quilt, craft, activity, review

Kate Harris
19
 

History of Mormons in America

This collection of artifacts, photographs, texts, and historical markers is intended to help students explore the history of the Mormon religion in America.

Each of these items is intended to spark inquiry, following the process below:

  1. Students should choose one artifact on which to focus.
  2. Have them use the artifact analysis PDF (last resource) to begin their study of the artifact.
  3. Next, have students generate questions about the artifact? What do they wonder about? What does it tell them about the Mormon religion or its history within the United States?
  4. Have students complete some general research on their artifact that will help their classmates piece together the story of the Mormon experience.

As a collaborative project, students should use the PBS Forced Migrations map/timeline as a model for a class map/timeline of their own.

  1. Project an image of the map on a class whiteboard or create your own basic outline using large paper.
  2. Have each student present their research findings. The main questions they should answer are: What does it represent about the Mormon experience? Where would the artifact they chose be placed (geographically and in terms of chronology)?
  3. Students should then place place their image on the map with significant dates noted.
  4. After all groups have presented, review the narrative of the Mormon experience with the class. What would they identify as critical moments in Mormon history? What questions do they still have?
Tags: religion, Moroni, Joseph Smith, Brigham Young, Mormon, New York, Utah, Illinois, gold plates, inquiry
Kate Harris
18
 

Analyzing Photography in the U.S. History Classroom

Resources supporting the March 2017 Google Hangout facilitated by the National Museum of American History's curator of Photographic History, Shannon Perich, in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access. Suggested questions for analyzing photographs, yearbooks, photo albums and portraits are included. The archived version of the online session is available at the end of the collection for viewing.

Tags: Migrant Mother, Napalm Girl, Tank Man, Times Square Kiss, 1943 Rohwer Center High School Yearbook, WWI Photo album, Robert Wiengarten, Hank Aaron

Shannon Perich
23
 

Nixon in Political Cartoons

This collection includes nine political cartoons about Richard Nixon's presidency and the Watergate scandal, as well as a cartoon analysis worksheet from the National Archives and Record Administration and a link to more cartoons about Nixon at the Library of Congress.

Teachers may use this collection in many ways: by assigning individual students or groups cartoons to analyze and share with the class via presentations, using the "jigsaw" format to create expert groups on each cartoon and then share information that way, or by creating a gallery walk of cartoons for students to work on individually. Students might even create their own political cartoon about the Nixon presidency, focusing on one of several topics: Watergate, ping-pong diplomacy, detente, visit to Moscow, environmental protections, the "southern strategy," busing, his relationship with the press, Vietnam, and more.

Kate Harris
11
 

Creative Questions about the Great Wall

This collection highlights the Creative Questioning thinking routine from Project Zero. Students will watch a video clip about the Great Wall of China and generate questions they have about the topic. Then, they will use the question starters to improve and expand upon their questions. Finally, they will choose one of their questions as the starting point for further research.

tag: Great Wall, China, military, inquiry

Kate Harris
6
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

Arthur Glaser
17
 

Aspects of the New Deal

Each item in this collection matches a part of the New Deal. Students must justify their answer using evidence in the image.

Michelle Moses
5
 

J. Edgar hoover

lead investigator of the FBI (federal Bureau of Investigation of the United States) from 1935 to 1972

kane mcluckie
8
 

Reconstruction in the American South #TeachingInquiry

This collection contains images, lithographs, and written documents pertaining to the period of Reconstruction. Reconstruction marks the period in American history beginning in 1863 and lasting through 1877. This collection will help to better understand the role Reconstruction played in re-establishing race relations and enfranchising African Americans, but also the struggles African Americans faced in upholding their rights. People who view this collection will be able to analyze and respond to the question "Was Reconstruction successful?" #TeachingInquiry

Rania Assily
10
 

Look for the Helpers: Analyzing Social Movements

Mr. Rogers is quoted as saying, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping." This collection will give students a framework to "look for the helpers"--the people who are trying to change society for the better during difficult times. Students will be introduced to a variety of strategies and tactics used in social movements, and consider how these might apply to an area of their own interest.

Included is a chart listing possible strategies for social movements that encourages students to find examples of tactics/strategies from the collection and determine the goals of each.

Opportunities for extension include:

Identify a social movement that relies on more than one strategy (most do). Can you create a "recipe" listing the various tactics used to create a successful movement?

Who is involved? Choose one of the examples from above to study further. Who was involved in that particular tactic or strategy? Consider different occupations (teacher, writer, church leader, student, mother) and also different demographics (gender, race, age, ethnicity, etc.)

What's missing? Are there strategies that you have encountered in your research that don't fit into this chart?

Kate Harris
31
 

The Ramayana

This teaching collection and student activity includes the resources necessary to teach an EDSITEment lesson on the Ramayana where students read closely to find examples of the Hindu concept of dharma.

Guiding questions are:

  • What is dharma?
  • How does the Ramayana teach dharma, one of Hinduism's most important tenants?

tags: Hinduism, Hindu, India, dharma, Ramayana, rama, epic, Vishnu

Kate Harris
11
 

Declaration of Independence Resources

A collection of resources related to Thomas Jefferson and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. It can be edited or analyzed from a number of POVs.

Amy Kerr
5
457-480 of 497 Collections