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Found 12,798 Resources

poster

National Museum of American History
A poster promoting the Peace Corps. Authorized by Congress in 1962 more than 235,000 Americans have joined the Peace Corps and served in 141 countries. They work with governments, schools, entrepeneurs in education, youth development, community health, business, information technology, environment, agriculture, as well as non-profit organizations.

poster

National Museum of American History
A poster promoting the Peace Corps. Authorized by Congress in 1962 more than 235,000 Americans have joined the Peace Corps and served in 141 countries. They work with governments, schools, entrepeneurs in education, youth development, community health, business, information technology, environment, agriculture, as well as non-profit organizations.

poster

National Museum of American History
A poster commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps. Authorized by Congress in 1962 more than 235,000 Americans have joined the Peace Corps and served in 141 countries. They work with governments, schools, entrepeneurs in education, youth development, community health, business, information technology, environment, agriculture, as well as non-profit organizations.

poster

National Museum of American History
A poster promoting the Peace Corps. Authorized by Congress in 1962 more than 235,000 Americans have joined the Peace Corps and served in 141 countries. They work with governments, schools, entrepeneurs in education, youth development, community health, business, information technology, environment, agriculture, as well as non-profit organizations.

playtime in the playroom

National Museum of American History
Hand-crafted stereoview by Bruce McKaig. Hand colored image that depicts two children playing. "Christopher" on wall in back ground; dress; children in pajamas; One of two to fit a specific viewer created by McKaig.

playtime in the playroom

National Museum of American History
Handcrafted stereoview by Bruce McKaig. Hand colored image that depicts two children playing. "Christopher" on wall in back ground; dress; children in pajamas; Two of two to fit a specific viewer created by McKaig.

optical apparatus

National Museum of American History
This is a conical glass lens on a brass base that would fit on an optical bench. The "Wm. Grunow, New York" inscription refers to WIlliam Grunow (b. 1830), a noted German-American optical instrument maker. Ref: D.J. Warner, "Julius and William Grunow," Rittenhouse 3 (1989): 41-48.

magneto demonstration

National Museum of American History
Demonstration Apparatus, Rotator - coils rotate between arms of horseshoe magnet, simple commutator, brass fittings. This unit is similar to 1989.0743.340 and 1988.0288.01. Univ. of Virginia property marking: "H-10" Ref: Daniel Davis, Manual of Magnetism, (Boston 1847), 211-213, fig. 146.

From Davis, 1847: "Revolving Electro-Magnet. In the instrument represented in Fig. 146, a steel U-magnet is fixed in a vertical position, and a small straight bar of soft iron, enclosed in a helix, is so arranged as to revolve between its poles. The two extremities of the insulated wire surrounding this electromagnet, are connected respectively with the segments of a pole-changer on the shaft. The silver springs, which press upon the pole-changer, are attached to two stout brass wires, passing through the brass arch surmounting the U-magnet, but insulated from it by the intervention of ivory or horn; each of these wires supports a brass cup for connection with the battery. These springs must be so placed with regard to the segments, that the poles of the revolving bar shall be reversed at the moment when it is passing the poles of the fixed magnet.

On making connection with the battery, when the bar is at right angles to the plane of the magnet, it immediately acquires a strong polarity. Its north pole is then attracted by the south pole of the steel U-magnet and repelled by the north pole. The south pole of the bar, on the contrary, is repelled by the similar pole of the upright magnet, and attracted by its opposite pole. These four forces conspire in bringing the electro-magnet between the poles of the U-magnet. When it reaches this position, each segment of the pole-changer leaves the spring with which it was in contact, and passes to the other. As the bar is moving past the poles by the momentum it has gained, its magnetism is destroyed for a moment, and immediately restored in the opposite direction. Each pole of the bar is now repelled by that pole of the permanent magnet which it has just passed, and attracted by the opposite one; it consequently moves on, the polarity being reversed twice in each revolution."

left to right: left to right: Mayris Chaney (Mrs. Hershey Martin) and Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
left to right: Dancer Mayris Chaney (Mrs. Hershey Martin), sitting on arm of chair, and Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962). Chaney was a renowned professional dancer who became a close friend of Eleanor Roosevelt during the 1930s; in 1941, Roosevelt, as assistant director of the U.S. Office of Civilian Defense, recruited Chaney to coordinate a nationwide physical fitness program.

left chaparrera

National Museum of American History
The spurs were a gift from the paniolo cowboy Masatsu “Masa” Kawamoto. Spurs are the metal device attached to a cowboy’s boots that were used to dig into the horse’s side to encourage it to go faster. Masa has donated two different types of spurs. The first pair of spurs is made out of metal and leather with a piece of wire wrapped around it. The second pair of spurs is made from the traditional Spanish and Mexican style with a spiked metal wheel and a leather strap that fits the metal spur onto the boot.

knife; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Knife, part of a picnic set with matching fork (1986.0531.062B). Short, straight steel blade with pointed tip and pewter bolster. Blade and tang are one piece of steel fitted with bolster into a wooden handle with rounded sides and blunt butt. Handle is comprised of two pieces of wood riveted to tang with brass pins. When facing one another, knife and fork fit together. Metal is scratched and stained overall, minor rust, nicks in bolster. Wood is separating towards butt.

Blade is etched: “UNIVERSAL/L.F.&C.”

Maker is Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Connecticut (c. 1862). In 1890, L. F. & C. took on the Trademark “Universal”, in 1965, General Electric acquired the company. The company began using the abbreviation “L.F.& C.” in 1898, this mark is dated 1912.

knife, table

National Museum of American History
Table knife. Straight stainless steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece of metal with tang, fitted into celluloid handle with straight sides and rounded butt. Metal and handle are scratched overall. Blade is warped and has small chips at tip. Handle is crazed, separating from bolster.

Blade is stamped: “X/Y/SHEFFIELD STEEL PRODUCTS LTD/SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND/FIRTH/BREARLEY/STAINLESS”

Maker is Firth Brearley Sheffield Steel Products Limited. Harry Brearley is credited with developing what is widely regarded as the first ‘rustless’ or stainless steel in 1913. Four years later, Brearley established the Firth-Brearley Stainless Steel Syndicate with Thomas Firth & Sons Limited to handle licensing Sheffield firms of stainless steel in USA, Canada, Italy, France, and Japan.

knife, table

National Museum of American History
Table knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel with tang, fitted into an ivory handle with rounded sides and butt. Metal and ivory are both scratched and discolored. Minor spots of rust on blade. Fine cracks in ivory.

Blade is stamped: “WIDDOWSON & VEALE/73 STRAND LONDON”

Handle is marked in black, old English: “J”

Widdowson & Veale was the dealer, founded circa 1835, active in London, England.

knife, dinner; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife, one of two with matching dinner forks (1986.0531.043-.46). Upturned steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel fitted into a tapered block horn handle with chamfered edges and blunt butt. Tang is held in handle with one brass pin, with round horn peg at butt. Overall nicked and scratched, blade is heavily discolored with some rust and residues. Horn is cracked.

Blade is stamped: “L . BOOTH/NORFOLK ST WORKS/SHEFFIELD”

Maker is possibly L[uke] Booth, active in Sheffield, England in the early 19th century until his death in 1855.

knife, dinner; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife, one of two with matching dinner forks (1986.0531.043-.46). Upturned steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel fitted into a tapered block horn handle with chamfered edges and blunt butt. Tang is held in handle with one brass pin, with round horn peg at butt. Overall nicked and scratched, blade is heavily discolored with some rust. Horn is cracked.

Blade is stamped: “L . BOOTH/NORFOLK ST WORKS/SHEFFIELD”

Maker is possibly L[uke] Booth, active in Sheffield, England in the early 19th century until his death in 1855.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight steel blade with tapered and rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece fitted into the top of a flat tapered block ivory handle with rounded edges. Deeply scratched and discolored overall, yellowed ivory, chipped and bent blade.

Blade is stamped: “V R/RODGERS’ CUTLERY/NORFOLK WORKS/SHEFFIELD”

Maker is Joseph Rodgers & Sons, active 1682-1971 in Sheffield, England.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel fitted into a tapered hard rubber handle with rounded sides and butt. Blade is discolored and rusted. Rubber is scratched.

Blade is etched: “LANDERS FRARY & CLARK/AETNA WORKS”

Maker is Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Connecticut (c. 1862). In 1890, L. F. & C. took on the Trademark “Universal”, in 1965, General Electric acquired the company.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight steel blade with slightly pointed, rounded tip and “yankee” style bolster. Blade has slight “S” curve. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel with tang, fitted into celluloid handle with rounded sides and blunt butt. Handle has carved molding at top and bottom. Scratched and stained overall, minor rust on blade.

Blade is etched: “UNIVERSAL/L.F.&C.”

Maker is Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Connecticut (c. 1862). In 1890, L. F. & C. took on the Trademark “Universal”, in 1965, General Electric acquired the company.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight, silver-plated steel blade with rounded tip and pewter bolster soldered in place. Blade and tang are one piece of steel fitted into wooden handle with rounded sides and rounded pewter pommel cap at butt. Bolster and pommel cap have clover shapes inlaid into wood on front and back of handle (now missing from bolster). Blade is heavily discolored, and much of the silver plate is scraped off. Wood is cracked near areas of missing inlay.

Blade is stamped: “FRARY CUTLERY CO/PAT JULY 18,1876”

Patent:

US179927 A, July 18, 1876, John B. H. Leonard, assignor to the Frary Cutlery Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut, for “Improvement in table-cutlery”

Maker is the Frary Cutlery Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut, established in 1876 by James D. Frary, one of the founders of Landers, Frary & Clark. Frary sold the company in 1881 to Trunk, Bliss, and Healy and formed James D. Frary & Son Company.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Steel blade with slightly upturned false edge and rounded tip. 2/3 of cutting edge is lightly serrated on one side. Blade and tang are fitted into a cream-colored plastic handle cast in two pieces, seam at side. Tapered handle has straight sides and faceted and rounded butt. Top and bottom of handle has teardrop relief and teardrop impression decoration. Blade is scratched. Handle is soiled, discolored, crack along one side.

Blade is etched: “Super Edge/STAINLESS STEEL/U.S.A.”

Maker is the Utica Cutlery Company of Utica, New York (1910-present), founded as a pocketknife manufacturer. The company introduced fixed blade kitchen cutlery in 1918, and stainless steel flatware in 1952.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
One-armed man’s knife. Short, upturned steel blade with three tines at tip. Blade and “yankee” style bolster are one piece of steel fitted into an ivory-colored celluloid handle with rounded sides and butt. Scratched overall, celluloid is darkened and starting to separate from the bolster.

Blade is etched: “RUSSELL/STAINLESS”; with an arrow through the “R”

Maker is John Russell & Company, Turner Falls, Massachusetts, 1834-present.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and bolster are one piece fitted into the top of a square block ivory handle with rounded butt. Scratched and discolored overall, yellowed ivory, deep crack down center of handle.

Blade is stamped: “V R/JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS/CUTLERS TO HER MAJESTY”; with their trademark, the Maltese cross and star.

Maker is Joseph Rodgers & Sons, active 1682-1971 in Sheffield, England.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip is one piece of steel with tang. Dark wooden scales are riveted to tang with pewter pins to form a block handle with rounded sides. Handle is fitted with a pewter bolster and rounded pewter pommel cap. Steel is scratched, discolored, with spots of rust. Pewter has nicks, scratches, and spots of green corrosion. Wood is scratched, nicked.

Blade is stamped: “RIVERSIDE KNIFE CO.”

Maker is the Riverside Knife Company, active in Croydon, New Hampshire circa 1850.

knife, dinner

National Museum of American History
Dinner knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip and “yankee” style bolster. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel fitted into a brown hard rubber handle with rounded sides and butt. Blade is scratched and discolored with minor rust. Handle is nicked in two spots.

Blade is stamped: “INDIA RUBBER HANDLE/CUTLERY Co/C. POPRENHUSEN’S/PATENT MARCH 31, 1857”

Patent:

US 16955 A, March 31, 1857, Conrad Poppenhusen and C.F. Edward Simon of College Point, New York, for “Making Table-Knives”

Maker is the India Rubber Handle Cutlery Company, active in the mid-19th century in New York.
25-48 of 12,798 Resources