Skip to Content

Found 1,914 Resources

Fiber mask

National Museum of African Art
Knotted fiber hood mask with attached tubular eyes and hornbill casque for nose. A tall cylindrical form which holds feathers projects from the top.

Fiber mask

National Museum of African Art
Plant fiber hood mask with cowrie shells on face, eye holes and back and central crest.

Fiber mask

National Museum of African Art
Fiber mask representing a hyena with large oval body with fiber fringe; animal head with movable lower jaw; red spots painted on black body.

Fiber mask

National Museum of African Art
1. Fiber constructed hooded mask with a plastic bead-edged crest and twisted fiber extensions on sides. Some of the extensions end in beads. The face area is a rectangular panel with X-crossed lines of cowrie shells. 2. Vest (chest band with shoulder straps) of blue-and-white striped, locally woven cotton cloth, fastened in front with fiber; baobab fruit halves form breasts; 2 tassels of cowrie shells hang in back; 5 strands of glass beads, red, green and light blue in color; 4 strands end in white metal French colonial coins, 1948, 1949; 1 strand ends incast copper alloy spherical bell with concentric circles motif. 3. Skirt of black dyed raffia fiber with twisted cord waist band.

2. Vest (chest band with shoulder straps) of blue-and-white striped, locally woven cotton cloth, fastened in front with fiber; baobab fruit halves form breasts; 2 tassels of cowrie shells hang in back; 5 strands of glass beads, red, green and light blue in color; 4 strands end in white metal French colonial coins, 1948, 1949; 1 strand ends incast copper alloy spherical bell with concentric circles motif. 3. Skirt of black dyed raffia fiber with twisted cord waist band.

3. Skirt of black dyed raffia fiber with twisted cord waist band.

Fiber mask

National Museum of African Art
Fiber mask – red, black, and white in coloration – characterized by anthropomorphic facial features and topped by a very tall and slightly backward-curving conical shape encircled with three raised rings. The conical superstructure is ornamented with linear designs arranged in diamond shapes bisected by a raised vertical rib, white in color, which extends from the uppermost tip of the superstructure down to the bridge of the nose. The projecting eyes are accented with red and white pigment. The nose is formed by the lower portion of the raised vertical rib, and the rounded mouth is slightly open. White dots, 6 to 8 in a cluster, ornament the forehead, temples, and cheeks of the face mask. The mask terminates in a fiber ruff stitched to the lower portion of the mask.

Fiber mask

National Museum of African Art
Fiber constructed hooded mask with a plastic bead-edged crest decorated with metal disks and a face area covered with cowrie shells.

Oral history interview with Walter Nottingham, 2002 July 14-18

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 29 pages

Sound recording: 4 sound files (1 hr., 41 min.) digital, wav

An interview of Walter Nottingham conducted 2002 July 14-18, by Carol Owen, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the studios of Idyllwild Arts, in Idyllwild, California. Nottingham speaks of his enthusiasm for basketball; being an altar boy and, as such, surrounded by beautiful fabrics at an early age; attending St. Cloud State University on the GI Bill; his teachers Jim Crane and Pauline Penning; serving as an art consultant for public schools in Jackson, Michigan; the lasting influence of an exhibition of battle flags at the Metropolitan Museum; articulating aging and decay through self-taught weaving; developing a fiber art program at University of Wisconsin, River Falls; attending Cranbrook Academy of Art and working with Glen Kaufman and Meda Johnson. He discusses specific works including his "Yahooties", that combine both his grandmother's and mother's crochet work; his trip to Mexico City on a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1974; forming the company Off the Wall with his eldest daughter Karron and their decorative design commissions; the influence of his Catholic upbringing, oriental philosophy, and spirituality in his work; and techniques and materials. Nottingham recalls Shelly Ross, Helen Drutt, Francis Merritt, Don Miller, Lois Moran, Jack Lenor Larsen, Marianne Strengell, Mildred Constantine, Gerhardt Knodel, Lee Nordness, Ed Rossbach, and others.

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell, 2002 June 3 and July 10

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 80 pages.

An interview of Peggie Hartwell conducted 2002 June 3-July 10, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in the artist's apartment, on Central Park West, New York, N.Y.

Hartwell speaks of growing up on a farm with her extended family in Springfield, S.C.; female quiltmakers and male storytellers in her family; drawing in sand as a child; her mother's move to Brooklyn; joining her mother and father in New York; growing up in Brooklyn; her awareness of the many cultures in New York and being surrounded by art, including her mother's crocheting and her father's a cappella group; taking tap dancing lessons; experimenting with art in public school; working at various factory jobs after high school until "reconnecting" with art; studying with dancer Syvilla Fort at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance in New York; Fort encouraging her to draw on the studio walls and sew costumes; touring internationally with the theater group Harlem Rhythm USA from 1965 to 1972; her return to the U.S. and receiving a theater degree at Queens College; working at an insurance company to support her art; exhibiting her black and white, pen-and-ink drawings; the narratives and "oral histories" in her quilts; the meaning of various fabrics and colors; participating in "quilting communities" such as the Women of Color Quilters Network, Empire Quilters, and the American Quilter's Society; her lectures, workshops, and residencies; working with children;narratives inspired by childhood memories; her move back to South Carolina; themes in her quilts and "quilting styles" (improvisational, traditional, contemporary, and African American); serving on the board of the New York Chapter of the Women of Color Quilters Network; and planning the exhibition "Threads of Faith" for the New York Bible Association. She also comments on John Cage, Cuesta Benberry, Asadata Dafora, Francelise Dawkins, Carolyn Mazloomi, Edjohnetta Miller, Arthur Mitchell, Harriet Powers, Faith Ringgold, Marie Wilson, and others.

DC Artist Amber Robles-Gordon

Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
An interview with Washington, DC fiber artist Amber Robles-Gordon about her work and process.

Spindle and fiber/yarn

National Museum of the American Indian

Fiber mask with costume

National Museum of African Art
Knotted fiber cylindrical mask with tubular eyes and raffia neck ruff with knotted fiber shirt, pants and raffia skirt.

Fiber mask with costume

National Museum of African Art
Knotted fiber cylindrical mask with two points on top, tubular eyes and raffia neck ruff attached to a knotted fiber shirt and raffia skirt. a: headress b: skirt c: skirt d: pants e: wrist covering f: wrist covering g: ankle covering h: ankle covering

a: headress b: skirt c: skirt d: pants e: wrist covering f: wrist covering g: ankle covering h: ankle covering

e: wrist covering f: wrist covering g: ankle covering h: ankle covering

g: ankle covering h: ankle covering

Anne Wilson artists' statement

Archives of American Art
Artists' Statement : 1 p. : typescript ; 28 x 22 cm.

Statement has heading: A brief statement about my work

Oral history interview with Barbara Lee Smith, 2009 March 16-17

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 6 sound files (5 hr., 21 min.)

Transcript: 122 pages

An interview of Barbara Lee Smith conducted 2009 March 16-17, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Smith's home, in Gig Harbor, Washington. Smith speaks of moving around a lot with her family as a child; most of her childhood memories in Cape May, New Jersey where she recalls an early love of the ocean; playing piano from early childhood through young adulthood and its continued influence in her visual art; attending Douglass College at Rutgers University where she graduated with a home economics major; the first time she saw an Abstract Expressionist exhibition in college and the memory of those paintings; her love of color through sunsets and music; learning machine embroidery as a young mother from a Better Homes & Gardens article in the 1960s; falling in love with embroidery and learning as much as she could about the art form; being influenced by artists such as Mariska Karasz and Constance Howard; taking initiative after the Human Potential Movement and started pursuing embroidery art full time; participating in local, national and international embroidery and craft guilds; her love of historic embroideries; receiving her MFA Northern Illinois University; various techniques from her early years of making that still find their way into her work today; teaching workshops and seminars as an adult education teacher for almost 40 years; the influence of traveling to places such as Japan, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom has had on her work; early abstract works in comparison to her recent, more representational work; the role maps have played in a good portion of her work; her work process and rather painterly approach to creating; the love of making and creating; the challenge and problem-solving qualities of taking commissions; writing the book, "Celebrating the Stitch" and the subsequent exhibitions that traveled around the world; the use of layering in her work to create clear layers of color; a collaborative book project with fellow artist, Jane Dunnewold; various exhibitions she has participated in and curated; her studio in Gig Harbor, Washington; relocating to Washington after 30 years in Chicago, Illinois and the influence the move had on her work. Smith also recalls Jill Nordforsclark, Randall Lanou, John Pemberton III, Jane Buckley, Jean Ray Laury, Jens Jensen, Bucky King, Henry Stahmer, Mary Lee Hu, Barbara Krug, Diane and Bill Itter, Renie Breskin Adams, Dimitri and Avra Liakos, Michael James, Chris Timmons, Studs Terkel, Bertil Vallien, Deidre Scherer, Jan Beaney, Tadao Andu, Jacquline Govin, Jean Littlejohn, and Billie Ruth Sudduth among others.

Who's Who on Artists of American Negro Artists Exhibit

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
A list of who's who of the artists featured in the American Negro Artists exhibit that opened on the ground floor of the U.S. National Museum Building on May 16, 1929. A traveling exhibition, the artwork was on display in Washington, DC, for twelve days. These artists, including Archibald Motley, Palmer Hayden, and Hale Woodruff, represented African American achievement and were the first representations of black life and culture that were partially controlled by African Americans themselves.

Fiber Montage--A Textile Notebook

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Fiber Mat Cape Or Cloak

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
Based on old original tags with artifacts, ET9350, ET11446 and ET12245 appear to be from the same collection. It seems, though these tags are faded and fragmentary, that they say Wanganui on them, as well as identifying the pieces. The fragmentary tag with ET9350 appears to say: "40. Wanganui, Toi Mat, Pehira; 40. [To]i mat [dy]ed black [Peh]ira Turei." It appears that ET105 is from this same collection as well. The tag for ET12245 appears to be written on/over a visiting card printed with a name R W Woon. There was a Richard Watson Woon (1834 - 1888) who was a Native Interpreter and Clerk to the Bench and Resident Magistrate in Wanganui, New Zealand in the 1800's. The handwriting on these tags matches Woon's handwriting in letters in the collections of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, N.Z.

FROM LOGBOOK: TWINED FIBER MAT.

See pp. 615 - 617 in Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute Volume 9, 1876; link to p. 617 here: http://rsnz.natlib.govt.nz/image/rsnz_09/rsnz_09_02_0749_0617_ac_01.html . On 16 September 1876, Dr. James Hector gave an account of his travels to a meeting of the Wellington Philosophical Society, including information on the New Zealand exhibits at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia: "He mentioned the objects which appeared to attract most attention, and referred particularly to the exhibition of Feather Furs by Mr. Liardet, a magnificent series of Photographs by Mr. Deveril, Messrs. Burton Bros., and others, and a fine collection of Maori exhibits forwarded by Mr. Richard Woon, R.M., of Wanganui." On p. 223 of the book Norton, Frank H., and Frank Leslie. 1877. Frank Leslie's historical register of the United States Centennial Exposition, 1876. Embellished with nearly eight hundred illustrations drawn expressly for this work by the most eminent artists in America. Including illustrations and descriptions of all previous International exhibitions. New York: Frank Leslie's Pub. House, there is a description of the New Zealand section at the Centennial Exposition, including descriptions of Maori artifacts displayed there: "There are also ... flax mats, ornamented with red feathers of the kaka, or mounted parrot; others interwoven with feathers of the native wood-pigeon, one in particular intended as a gift to the President of the United States ... ."

Comparing the information on the artifact's original handwritten tag against the list of the collection made by Richard Watson Woon for display at the New Zealand exhibit of the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; see list on p. 335 of Great Britain. Executive commission, Philadelphia exhibition, 1876. 1876. Official catalogue of the British section, Part I. London: Printed by G.E. Eyre and W. Spottiswoode, for Her Majesty's stationery office, http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015067183486;view=1up;seq=345, this object appears to be the one listed as: "40. [original owner] Pehira Turei Queen's pensioner - Toi Mat made from Toi plant found at foot of Tongariro, or the burning mountain." This appears to be a kahu toi style rain cape, see http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/topic/3635 : "Kahu toi are prestigious warrior capes made of leaf fibre from the hardy toi (mountain cabbage tree)."

James Hector of the (New Zealand) Colonial Museum and Geological Survey was the Representative Commissioner for the New Zealand exhibits at the Philadelphia Centennial. In addition to material sent from New Zealand, these exhibits also included some artifacts borrowed from the Smithsonian through Joseph Henry. A group of Maori artifacts provided by Richard Watson Woon were a subset of the New Zealand Centennial exhibit. Hector, while in the U.S. in 1876, also visited Washington, DC and Spencer Baird. Though Woon indicated that the majority of the Maori exhibits should return to New Zealand, two artifacts were designated as gifts for the President of the United States, and a few other pieces also were not returned to New Zealand. The objects intended as presidential gifts, ET12245 and ET105, and also at least two other pieces, ET9350 and ET11446, all became part of the Smithsonian collections, under Accession No. 5733, though the Department of Anthropology never seems to have assigned catalogue numbers to them. The Archives at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa has correspondence in their files from Woon related to the Centennial exhibition artifacts; see in particular MU000177/001/0160. The Te Papa archives also has a letter, MU000177/001/0002/0001, dated July 8, 1876, from Spencer Baird to James Hector, thanking Hector for transferring objects that had been displayed at the Centennial to the Smithsonian U.S. National Museum. See also New Zealand. 1858. Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives of New Zealand. Auckland [N.Z.]: Printed for the House of Representatives by W.C. Wilson at the Printing Office; Report of Royal Commission Appointed To Secure The Representation Of New Zealand, Philadelphia Centennial International Exhibition of 1876. https://books.google.com/books?id=cSxAAQAAMAAJ&lpg=RA4-PA49&dq=motumotu%20flax%20new%20zealand&pg=RA5-PA1#v=onepage&q=motumotu%20flax%20new%20zealand&f=false .

Oral history interview with Jane Sauer, 2005 July 11

Archives of American Art
3 sound discs (6 hr., 15 min.) : digital ; 2 5/8 in.

An interview of Jane Sauer conducted 2005 July 11, by Paul J. Smith, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home, in Santa Fe, N.M.

Sinew, Fiber, Reed, Bark (mural study)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Adela Akers

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm.

Photo shows Akers examining one of her textiles, a long piece suspended in the middle of a room. Another textile piece is hanging on the wall behind her, and she is flanked by two low tables filled with pebbles displaying pieces of pottery.

Mark Newport on Marie Watt—Connections: Renwick Gallery

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this interview, fiber artist Mark Newport discusses the textile works of Marie Watt, and questions the conventional implications of comfort, warmth, and domesticity traditionally associated with blankets. “Connections: Contemporary Craft at the Renwick Gallery” highlights the evolution of the craft field as it transitions into a new phase at the hands of contemporary artists, which in some way echoes the communal spirit and ideology of the pioneers of the American Studio Craft Movement in their heyday. http://renwick.americanart.si.edu/connections

The Architectural Forum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
This is a complete magazine, all pages are bound together. Page 5 image is also available as a loose page, see 7.2018.18.

Allen Fannin to Francis Merritt

Archives of American Art
Letter : 3 p. : signed ; 28 x 22 cm.

Letter from fiber artist Allen A. Fannin to Merritt, January 19, 1972, about broadening Haystack's reach to African American students.

Walter Nottingham to Francis Sumner Merritt

Archives of American Art
Letter : 1 p. : handwritten ; 28 x 22 cm.

Letter from fiber artist Walter Nottingham to Merritt, September 22, 1969, recalling his time at Haystack.
25-48 of 1,914 Resources