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"A Ship Without a Sail"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “A Ship Without a Sail,” with lyrics by Lorenz Hart and music by Richard Rodgers. It was published by Harms, Inc. in New York, New York in 1929. The song was featured in the 1929 Broadway music Heads Up!

"A Silent Foe at Valley Forge" Commemorative Plate

National Museum of American History

"A Song" signed by Hannah Denison

National Museum of American History

"A Wa Ka" quilt

Anacostia Community Museum

"A-Tisket A-Tasket"

National Museum of American History
Over the course of her sixty-year career, Ella Fitzgerald (1917–1996) became known to fans and colleagues as "The First Lady of Song." Her rise to international fame as a jazz and popular singer coincided with the rise of an American entertainment industry that brought music to millions through concerts, sound recordings, film, radio, and television. In 1938, Fitzgerald came up with the idea for a song called "A-Tisket, A-Tasket," basing her lyric on a 19th–century nursery rhyme. Her 1938 Decca recording of the song over time became a million–seller.

"AFD Hose One" Decorative Panel

National Museum of American History
This is a bas-relief carving of a hose wagon was painted red and mounted onto a wooden panel. Dated to around 1890-1900, the panel was most likely made for decoration and not used on a fire engine. The A.F.D. painted on the hose wagon possibly refers to the Albany Fire Department of New York.

"Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Ac-cent-tchu-ate the Positive," with words by Johnny Mercer and music by Harold Arlen. It was published by Edwin H. Morris, Inc. in New York, New York in 1944. This song was featured in the 1944 Paramount Pictures romantic comedy musical film Here Come the Waves, directed by Mark Sandrich and starred Bing Crosby, Betty Hutton, and Sonny Tufts. The cover features images of the stars of the film.

"African Commune of Bad, Relevant Artists" in Black Shades

Archives of American Art
Newsletter : 6 p. ; 28 x 22 cm. October 1971 issue of the newsletter Black Shades: A Black Art Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 4, published in Washington, DC. Includes six typescript pages with illustrations, photocopied. Newsletter features article "African Commune of Bad, Relevant Artists."

"After All"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "After All," with words by Edwin Gilbert and Paul Denniker and music by Alec Fogarty and "Zammy" Simmons. It was published by Joe Davis, Inc. in New York, New York in 1935.

"After You're Gone"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "After You've Gone," by Henry Creamer and Turner Layton. It was published by Broadway Music Corporation in 1918.

"Agriculture and Industry" coverlet, Figured and Fancy; double-cloth; 1836; New York

National Museum of American History
An unknown weaver created this red and white, Figured and Fancy, double-cloth coverlet featuring a “Double Rose” with a dotted ground centerfield, commonly found in New York coverlets. There are eagles, stars, Masonic symbols, and Federal-style buildings repeated in all four borders. These words are woven into to each corner, “AGRICULTURE & MANUFACTURES, ARE THE FOUNDATION OF OUR INDEPENDENCE July 4, 1836.” This cotton and wool, double-woven Jacquard coverlet was made for C. Collings in 1836 in New York State. This coverlet design has been replicated numerous times dated from 1824-1840 and appears in major museums across the country. This design was initially associated with weaver, James Alexander of New York, but the consensus has changed. This group of coverlets was possibly woven by more than one weaver whose identities have not been found. The floral medallions harken back to Scottish and English double-woven, ingrain carpet designs. See also, T16116 and T18131.

"Agriculture and Manufacture," Figured and Fancy, double-cloth coverlet; 1840; New York

National Museum of American History
This Jacquard double-cloth coverlet features a tulip, carpet medallion centerfield with eagle, federal architecture, and masonic motif borders. Inscribed in the coverlet’s corners and top and bottom edges are the name of the client, "Esther Jewil" and the phrase and date, "Agriculture & Manufactures are the Foundation of Our Independence. July 4, 1840." This coverlet was woven in Dutchess County, New York in 1840. Ester Jewell (1757-1844) was the recipient of this coverlet. It is interesting that the Jewell’s commissioned this coverlet just four years before her death. Esther’s husband, Isaac Jr., father-in-law, Isaac Sr., and brother-in-law were veterans of the American Revolution.

This particular design and inscription was woven numerous times, and there are dated coverlets of this pattern from 1824-1840. Likely because of its bold patriotic statement, this coverlet design appears in major museums across the country. NMAH has another red and white coverlet of the same design. This design was initially associated with Scots-Irish weaver, James Alexander, but the consensus has changed as Alexander had retired from weaving in 1828 and none of the client names in Alexander’s account book matched those found on extant “Agriculture and Manufacture” coverlets.

This group of coverlets was almost certainly woven by more than one weaver whose identities have not yet been found. The weavers were also almost certainly apprentices or journeymen working with Alexander before his retirement. The floral medallions harken back to Scottish and English double-woven carpet designs and are identical to those found on Alexander’s earlier coverlets. Even the Masonic and eagle borders featured on this coverlet are more refined versions of borders found on Alexander coverlets.

The National Museum of American History also possesses two more of these “Agriculture and Manufacture” coverlets (see T14962 and T18131). Perhaps, Alexander sold his weaving equipment and patterns to former apprentices who joined in partnership? There are two groups of these coverlets and over 125 of them known. One group was woven in two sections and joined with a center seam, the other group was woven on a broad loom and does not have the center seam. The Esther Jewell coverlet falls into the latter group. Broad looms required either two weavers or the use of a fly shuttle to get the weft yarn back and forth across the wider width of the fabric, otherwise the loom and fabric width was dictated by the weaver’s arm width. There is also so speculation as to whether these particular patterns were executed on a draw loom of with the help of a Jacquard mechanism. Alexander’s weaving career almost entirely predates the introduction of the Jacquard head into the United States, suggesting that these coverlets which are so much in his fashion were almost certainly also woven on a draw loom.

Being double-cloth, this coverlet has two sets of warps and wefts made of an Indigo wool 2-ply, S-twist, Z-spun warp and weft and a cotton 2-ply, S-Twist, Z-spun warp and weft. The warps and wefts change place throughout the weaving process, creating the contrasting designs and strengthening the structure and creating a heavier and warmer textile.

"Ain't That Something Now"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Ain't That Something Now," with words and music by Dave Oppenheim, Milton Berle, and Henry Tobias. It was published by Mills Music, Inc. in 1939. The cover features an image of American vaudevillian, musician, and actor Joe Cook [born Joseph Lopez] (1890-1959), who performed this song in the Broadway show Off to Buffalo, which premiered at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in New York on February 21, 1939.

"Album of Gems"

National Museum of American History

"Alice Blue Gown"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Alice Blue Gown," with music by Harry Tierney and lyrics by Joseph McCarthy. It was published by Leo Feist, Inc. in New York, New York in 1919. This song was featured in the Broadway comedy with music Irene which opened at the Fulton Theatre on November 20, 1919 and ran for 69 performances.

"All I Do Is Dream of You"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "All I Do Is Dream of You," with lyrics by Arthur Freed and melody by Nacio Herb Brown. It was published by Robbins Music Corporation in New York, New York in 1934. This song was written for the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer pre-Code film Sadie McKee. It was directed by Clarence Brown and starred Joan Crawford, Gene Raymond, Franchot Tone, Edward Arnold, and Esther Ralston. The cover features an image of actress Joan Crawford.

"All Over the Town"

National Museum of American History

"All the Things You Are"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "All the Things You Are," with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It was published by Chappell and Company, Inc. in New York, New York, in 1939. This song was featured in the Broadway musical Very Warm for May, with book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and music by Jerome Kern. Very Warm for May opened at the Alvin Theatre on November 17, 1939 and ran for 59 performances.

"Allied Soldiers at Attention" dress silk, Mallinson's La Victoire series II

National Museum of American History
"Allied Soldiers at Attention" is a design from the second La Victoire series, produced by H.R. Mallinson & Co. in conjunction with the Peace Conference held after the armistice that ended the fighting in World War I. A tribute to the armed forces of the Allied nations, this design from the second La Victoire series features five soldiers in dress uniforms with their national emblems – perhaps a guard of honor for the peace negotiations then in progress at the Palace of Versailles, whose gardens and fountains appear in the background. Printed in five brilliant colors on a black ground of Mallinson's trademark "Pussy Willow.",

"Alphabet" Plate

National Museum of American History

"American Beauty" Iron

National Museum of American History
Model 79AB, 1000W, 110-120V (AC only) clothes or laundry iron for domestic use. Chrome-plated, streamlined body has a forward-leaning, black Bakelite handle with red Lucite grip; handle front is set back from the pointed toe, while spurred back doubles as a heel rest. Thermostat control (fabric selector dial) and encased thermometer are below handle; both black with white markings. Brown, red, and yellow cloth-covered cord with 2-prong, bell-shape, brown plastic plug attached at back right of handle; black rubber tubing at attachment. No box.

Thermometer and handle back both marked "American / Beauty." Identification plate on heel underside stamped: "AMERICAN BEAUTY / CA. NO. 79AB. VOLTS 110-120 WATTS1000 / A.C. ONLY / AMERICAN ELECTRICAL HEATER CO. / DETROIT, U.S.A. / PAT. NO’S. / DES.121163 / ” 121164 / RE.22048 / 1916671 / PAT. NO’S. / 2256147 / 2270316 / 2300230 / 2328152 / TO REMOVE / CONTROL LEVER OR TERM. BOX COVER / PRY OFF / 8412".

U.S. Design Patents:

- 121163, June 25, 1940, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “a laundry iron”

- 121164, June 25, 1940, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “a handle for laundry iron or the like”

- RE.22048, March 10, 1942, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Electric iron”

U.S. Mechanical Patents:

- 1916671, July 4, 1933, Charles A. Hanser, Erwin A. Lockwood, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Thermostat”

- 2256147, Sept. 16, 1941, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Handle”

- 2270316, Jan. 20, 1942, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for "finish for working of laundry irons and the like" (sole plate)

- 2300230, Oct. 27, 1942, Frank Kuhn and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Thermometer unit for electric irons”

- 2328152, Aug. 31, 1943, Frank Kuhn and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for "Thermostatic unit and connections for electric irons"

Date made per phone conversation with manufacturer (in 1988).

"American Beauty" Rite-Heat Glower Stove

National Museum of American History
A. Table-top electric stove, nickel-plated. Rectangular block form on four ebonized wooden feet. Two pierced side panels with upper coiled heating unit comprised of curved metal coils mounted under a crisscrossed grate, insulated with long strips of mica. Hollow, flat base with canted sides. Rectangular drip pan with wire handle, under the heating element, can be pulled out for cleaning. Two prongs on back of upper grate for attaching power cord, with hood. Yellow enamel on underside of base. Attached metal plate at front, black with silver writing: “American Beauty” GLOWER STOVE/CAT. NO. 3350-G VOLTS 110-125 WATTS 500/LMP/MADE BY/ AMERICAN ELECTRICAL HEATER CO./DETROIT, U.S.A.”; top of base is engraved/stamped: “American Beauty” GLOWER STOVE/CAT. NO. 3350-G VOLTS 110-125 WATTS 500/LMP/MADE BY/ AMERICAN ELECTRICAL HEATER CO./DETROIT, U.S.A./PATENTS PENDING”

B. Black and gold cloth power cord, woven, with two separate porcelain attachments, black, on one end, molded plastic two-pronged plug on opposite end.

In original cardboard box marked: "RITE-HEAT GLOWER STOVE/ELECTRIC".

“LMP”: “Licensed under Marsh Patents”, for chromium-nickel alloy resistance wire, which was patented by Albert Marsh, Lake Bluff, Illinois, February 6, 1906. (Catalogue card)

An ad illustrated in Toasters and Small Kitchen Appliances: A Price Guide, p. 67 states that this “Utility Stove” was sold in 1920.

Maker is American Electric Heater Company, circa 1890-present.
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