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J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #2

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond, Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.2.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with color footage of a group men, women, and children sitting on a porch and smiling at the camera. This is followed by scenes of various people working on farms. Next, there is an out of focus wide shot of a family standing on a porch. There are multiple portrait-style shots of children. Followed by multiple shots of cattle. This is followed by black and white footage of school children and three female school teachers entering a rural school house. There are some interior and exterior portrait-style shots of children smiling at the camera. The same portrait-style shots are then used to capture adults standing in a field on a farm.

2016.16.2.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

J. Max Bond, Sr. Home Movie #3

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm color film is one of ten home movies shot by J. Max Bond, Sr. from 1930 to 1960. The footage mainly focuses on family, travel, and educational institutions with which J. Max Bond Sr. was associated.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a) and Original 400 foot Film Reel (b).

2016.16.3.1a: 16mm film. The film opens with a wide shot of men cheering from a covered grandstand at a homecoming football game. This is followed by pan shots of finely dressed women standing in a line and seated men cheering for the camera. Subsequently, there are wide shots of the football team warming up and of the game itself. Next, there are multiple shots of the Tuskegee marching band performing on the football field. The camera then shoots a man speaking to the crowd. This is followed by more shots of the marching band and the football game. The film then cuts to scenes from a ceramics class. There are multiple shots of ceramic objects and a close up of a bust of Booker T. Washington being sculpted. The following scene depicts children in a classroom with wide shots of the children and a teacher seated in a circle and multiple portrait-style shots of the children and teachers. Next, a weaving class is shown with wide shots of a loom in operation and students showing off objects they've made in the class. This is followed by multiple shots of a cooking class where a teacher is training students in various techniques. The next several shots are out of focus, but appear to depict people formally entering a room. The film ends with multiple shots from a funeral with both wide and portrait-style shots of the mourners.

2016.16.3.1b: Original 400 foot film reel.

Michael Holman Family Home Movie #26

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This film is from a collection of home movies filmed by the family of Michael Holman, an important figure in the history of hip hop.

Consists of: Super 8mm Film (a), Original Film Reel (b), and Original Film Container(c).

2016.31.3.26.1a: Super 8mm film. The film begins with several establishing shots of Crenshaw High School in Los Angeles, CA. Included are wide shots of the building and students exiting a school bus at the main entrance. Next, a series of shots depict students working in a chemistry classroom. Thomas Holman briefly appears as a chemistry teacher, wearing a white button down shirt with an open navy sweater and purple tie. The subsequent section of footage consists of wide shots of major landmarks on the University of Southern California campus. This is followed by a shot of people chatting in a classroom. In the next several shots, this same group of people are gathered outdoors on the USC campus chatting and mugging for the camera. The film concludes with further shots of landmarks on the USC campus and a Southern Pacific freight train passing through an unidentified location.

2016.31.3.26.1b: Original film reel. Yellow plastic with brief content notes.

2016.31.3.26.1c: Original film container. Blue plastic with Drewry Photocolor markings.

Nowhere to Hide

National Museum of African Art
Watercolor painting on paper in red, white, blue and black. The central motif is a lizard encased in a ring. Outside the ring are depictions of uli designs at various locations on the surface of the work.

Procreation

National Museum of African Art
Watercolor painting on paper with the predominant colors of blue and brown and the central motif in an nsibidi design. Running along the bottom is a band filled with various linear designs in red, black, white and blue.

Return of the Herdsman

National Museum of African Art
Watercolor painting on paper consisting of a blue circle in the upper part of the painting with circles and geometric motif within, and three undulating lines in blue, probably representing water.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 7

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the seventh in a collection of nine films.

On the outside of the metal can are handwritten inscriptions on three white adhesive labels reading: [Acc Oklahoma Jones], [Kids Playing / Basketball], and [pumping gas / oil]. In the center is a yellowed label reading [O.K. / Rev. S S Jones / Reel reel - Red / Needs a leader.] on top of an impinted design.

The film begins with footage from a gas station. The camera pans around the intersection in a commercial district with cars passing by in front of the camera. The next scene shows a man and a woman come out of a house and get into a car. Then the man and woman are seen in a field with cows. Then there is footage of two men in a cotton field. The woman is shown feeding chickens. The exteriors of two buildings are shown, and one of them is possibly the Grand Lodge of the Knights and Pythias. The next scene returns to the farm and a man working with horses and a woman taking care of some plants on the porch. Then a group of people walk out of the house and to a car in the front yard. At another house, a woman feeds the chickens and the camera shows a portrait of the family on the porch before they walk past the camera. Ducks walk around in the front yard. The footage shows people walking around in the yard. The next scene shows women exiting a building. After the women exit, men exit through the same door. There are also some children. The next scene appears to show those same people standing in a line as the camera pans and shows the group. There is a quick scene of children playing followed by young adult men and women walking down the steps after exiting the front door of a building. After a group of adults, possibly teachers, poses on the front steps and walks down, a large group of children walk out of the door and down the stairs. Following the children are more young adults. The next scene shows some of the students in the front of the school performing choreographed exercises and dances. The next scene is in a rural area with a building and an oil derrick. In the next scene, a man walks out of his house and is handed stacks of paper, perhaps money. The next scene shows four people standing on the front porch of a house before they walk down the front stairs. There are some other residential street scenes, and then footage of activity at a gas station. The next scene shows adults and children on the front porch of a house, and then the footage shows the exterior of the Eaglewing Hotel. The next scene shows the window sign for the State of Oklahoma Knights of Pythias Grand Lodge. The camera pans the exterior of the building, and a man comes out of a door and walks down the stairs to the sidewalk. The next footage shows a house and then a storefront. The next scene shows men working on a car, and then there is another scene at a gas station. The camera shows a Use Magnolia Gasoline and Magnolene Motor Oils and Greases advertisement painted on the side of the gas station building. The next scene shows a large house with a little girl playing outside. Then a man comes up to the porch and three women come out from inside. The next scene shows a farm and a woman feeding chickens. There is also footage of horses pulling equipment. The next scene shows a building with a long staircase and people coming outside to pose for a large group portrait. The footage includes the photographer setting up the camera. The crowd begins waving their hands and hats in the air as the film ends.

Sea Ghosts 3

National Museum of African Art
Meticulously detailed underwater scene with two fantastical creatures lying on the sea bed floor, one looks like a lizard, the other, like a two-headed eel. Delicate lines, cross-hatchings and rosettes are applied with strong black outlines and warm tones of rust.

Sheikh Amadou Bamba

National Museum of African Art
Reverse glass painting with four figures against a yellow sky: flying winged white robed figure; kneeling male figure in blue robe; standing male figure with white turban, scarf and robe, holding Islamic prayer beads; female figure in blue dress and green veil, holding a tea kettle and receiving an envelope from a flying bird.

The Cry (Head of a Djem statuette, Nigeria)

National Museum of African Art
Ink on paper with the face, head and neck of a human-like figure in shades of black, gray and white. Light appears to fall on the face from the upper right, darkening the neck, chin and lower left cheek of the face. The mouth is open and round, the front of the nose is darkened, the eyes are only outlined by faint, circular pencil lines and "hair" emerges from the head, from ear to ear, in heavy, triangular projections.

The End of the Beginning

National Museum of African Art
Horizontal oil on canvas paitning with a winged masked figure on the proper left, a long low lizard like animal in the lower proper right and a whitish bird in the center. the background is suggestive of menhirs or buildings and there is a wide range of colors.

The Fisherman and the River Goddess with his Captured Multi-Colored Fishes and the River Night Guard

National Museum of African Art
Horizontal oil, pastel and ink on wood panel with two figures in a boat, trees in the background and fish in the bottom of the boat.

They Left Us in Tatters

National Museum of African Art
Watercolor painting on paper, with colors of white and red predominating, with some blue. The central motif is a face placed in a white ring that is placed in a larger red square which itself is placed in an even larger white square. At the bottom are a series of linear motifs, probably uli designs.

Through the Broken Wall We Saw the Chameleon Change its Colors

National Museum of African Art
Watercolor painting on paper in warm orange and yellow tones with a white circle bordered by a brick motif and surmounting uli-inspired motifs, a chameleon and spirals inside of a rounded rectangular form.

Uli Notes

National Museum of African Art
Watercolor painting on paper consisting of an outline of a human head with uli motifs, geometric motifs and abstract representations of animals, a pot and a human within.

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of six African American children lined up against a brick wall. A few white children are walking around in the foreground.

Untitled

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white digital photograph by Devin Allen of unidentified women protesting in Baltimore, Maryland. The central figure is a woman named Amanda in a striped V-neck t-shirt with her right arm reaching upward and her hand outstretched. She looks upward and off frame slightly right. Behind her is a woman holding a cell phone while taking photographs or video next to a woman with her right arm raised and a sign in her left hand that is largely out of frame. Other figures largely out of frame surround the women. Raindrops are visible on the clothing and bodies of the people.

91.48 MB

A few Impressions of Current American Pottery

Archives of American Art
Essay : 5 p. : typescript ; 28 x 22 cm.

Leach writes about pottery as emerging from the second World War without a history, and how there are far more teachers being trained in pottery than there are pottery artists working. She recommends reversing this trend and points out that in the Orient there are far more pottery artists who are developing new and innovative styles.

That which is still lives as a monument

Archives of American Art
Lecture : 1 p. : handwritten ; 32 x 21 cm.

Lecture notes in which sculptor Paul Suttman describes still life sculpture as alive, and catalogs the natural and unnatural aspects of a three dimensional object.

Dizzy!

National Museum of American History

This linoleum print with black ink on white paper was made by Peter Bodge in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1982. It is a portrait of American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer, and singer John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie (1917–1993) entitled Dizzy! Print number 10/10.

Peter Bodge, is a jazz drummer, art teacher, and printmaker in Massachusetts. Bodge creates linoleum prints and other works on paper. His work most often features portraits, action shots semi-abstract interpretations of such famous jazz musicians, such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Elllngton , Count Basie and John Coltrane. In 1977, Bodge created a short animated film based on the life of Charlie Parker entitled Bird Lives!:

https://www.cambridgecollege.edu/bird-lives-film-peter-bodge

This print was featured on the 2002 poster for the Smithsonian's Jazz Appreciation Month.

https://americanhistory.si.edu/smithsonian-jazz/jazz-appreciation-month/jazz-appreciation-month-posters

Good-bye Porkpie Hat

National Museum of American History

This linoleum print with black ink on white paper was made by Peter Bodge in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1986. It is a portrait of American jazz tenor saxophonist Lester Young (1909-1959) entitled Good-bye Porkpie Hat. Print number 10/10.

Peter Bodge, is a jazz drummer, art teacher, and printmaker in Massachusetts. Bodge creates linoleum prints and other works on paper. His work most often features portraits, action shots semi-abstract interpretations of such famous jazz musicians, such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Elllngton , Count Basie and John Coltrane. In 1977, Bodge created a short animated film based on the life of Charlie Parker entitled Bird Lives!:

https://www.cambridgecollege.edu/bird-lives-film-peter-bodge

Lady Day

National Museum of American History

This linoleum print with black ink on white paper was made by Peter Bodge in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1986. It is a portrait of jazz vocalist Billie Holiday (1915-1959) entitled Lady Day. Artist's proof B.

Peter Bodge, is a jazz drummer, art teacher, and printmaker in Massachusetts. Bodge creates linoleum prints and other works on paper. His work most often features portraits, action shots semi-abstract interpretations of such famous jazz musicians, such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Elllngton , Count Basie and John Coltrane. In 1977, Bodge created a short animated film based on the life of Charlie Parker entitled Bird Lives!:

https://www.cambridgecollege.edu/bird-lives-film-peter-bodge

This print was featured on the 2003 poster for the Smithsonian's Jazz Appreciation Month.

https://americanhistory.si.edu/smithsonian-jazz/jazz-appreciation-month/jazz-appreciation-month-posters

Meditation

National Museum of American History

This linoleum print with black ink on white paper was made by Peter Bodge in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1986. It is a portrait of American composer. Pianist, and jazz band and orchestra leader , composer, Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (1918–1974) entitled Meditation. Print number 8/10.

Peter Bodge, is a jazz drummer, art teacher, and printmaker in Massachusetts. Bodge creates linoleum prints and other works on paper. His work most often features portraits, action shots semi-abstract interpretations of such famous jazz musicians, such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Elllngton , Count Basie and John Coltrane. In 1977, Bodge created a short animated film based on the life of Charlie Parker entitled Bird Lives!:

https://www.cambridgecollege.edu/bird-lives-film-peter-bodge

Stompin' at the Savoy

National Museum of American History

This linoleum print with black ink on white paper was made by Peter Bodge in Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1986. It is a portrait of American jazz and swing drummer and bandleader William Henry "Chick" Webb (1905–1939) entitled Stompin’ at the Savoy. Print 1/10.

Peter Bodge, is a jazz drummer, art teacher, and printmaker in Massachusetts. Bodge creates linoleum prints and other works on paper. His work most often features portraits, action shots semi-abstract interpretations of such famous jazz musicians, such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Elllngton , Count Basie and John Coltrane. In 1977, Bodge created a short animated film based on the life of Charlie Parker entitled Bird Lives!:

https://www.cambridgecollege.edu/bird-lives-film-peter-bodge

25-48 of 3,562 Resources