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Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (11 of 12): Aaraaghusik Iiggak (Fancy Gloves)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (3 of 12): Qanrak (Boat Sled)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (10 of 12): Qaghpa (Headdress)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (4 of 12): Avleqaghtat (Bolas)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (8 of 12): Kaamget (Boots)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (1 of 12): Uunghaq (Harpoon)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sharing the Dena'ina Language (3 of 3): Snowshoes

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center hosted the Dena’ina Language Institute in 2010 at the Living Our Cultures exhibit gallery located in the Anchorage Museum. Elders Helen Dick and Gladys Evanoff shared their knowledge about Dena'ina heritage objects in the Smithsonian collections, using the objects as tools to teach the Dena'ina Athabascan language. They worked with language learners, linguists and museum staff to script and record new language learning videos, including the three videos presented here. To learn more about the Dena'ina language go to the Dena'ina Qenaga website at http://qenaga.org/. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (12 of 12): Saguyak (Drum)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (2 of 12): Aghveghqutaq (harpoon head)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (6 of 12): Meteghlluwaaghet (Bird Carvings for Game)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (7 of 12): Atkuk (Parka)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

wining Cedar (3 of 15): Teachings from Tsimshian Master Weaver Lillian Buchert

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (1 of 15): Annette Island Tsimshian Basket Weaving

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (2 of 15): Weaving Terms

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (7 of 15): Harvesting and Preparing Canary Grass

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (3 of 15): Teachings from Tsimshian Master Weaver Lillian Buchert

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (6 of 15): Harvesting and Preparing Maidenhair Fern

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (14 of 15): Weaving Designs - False Embroidery

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (8 of 15): Weaving a Plaited Bottom

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (5 of 15): Preparing Red Cedar Bark

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (2 of 15): Weaving Terms

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (4 of 15): Harvesting Red Cedar Bark

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (12 of 15): Designs (Patterns)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Twining Cedar (1 of 15): Annette Island Tsimshian Basket Weaving

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.
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