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Concept Model of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model of the exterior the new National Air and Space Museum along Jefferson Drive shows the four solid facades and the three window facades.

Concept Model of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model of the exterior the new National Air and Space Museum along Jefferson Drive shows the four solid facades and the three window facades.

Concept Model of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. A 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, this initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model of the exterior the new National Air and Space Museum is of the west facade of the building and its seven solid facades with four having slender upper windows along Independence Avenue. A large window, which was installed after the rockets were moved into the building, is visible on the west end of the building.

Concept Model of Exterior for National Air & Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model of the exterior the new National Air and Space Museum along Independence Avenue shows the three solid facades and four facades having slender upper windows. In the center is the glass entrance area.

Concept Model of Exterior for New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

Preliminary design for a National Air Museum on a proposed site in the Washington, D.C. Southwest Redevelopment area bounded by Independence Avenue, 9th Street,12th Street, and C Street, Southwest. That area is a part of what is now known as L'Enfant Plaza.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Model called the "Wineglass Design", submitted by McKim, Mead & White, Architects, for a proposed new National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum) is an exterior view of the building taken at street level from the northeast.

Concept Model of Exterior for the New National Air Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Viewed from Independence Avenue, early concept model of the front entrance to the new National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum) designed by Gyo Obata of Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum. In this design the windows are shown light. A somewhat different design was eventually used.

North Exterior Elevation, Freer Gallery of Art

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Architectural sketch of the North Elevation, Building for the Freer Collections, Washington, D.C. The Freer Gallery of Art was designed by Architect Charles A. Platt.

Paul Manship's Massachusetts Studio (exterior view) [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title assigned by cataloger.

Rand, Harry, "Paul Manship," Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1989, pg. 146.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Paul Manship's Massachusetts Studio (exterior view) [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Rand, Harry, "Paul Manship," Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1989, fig. 151.

Paul Manship's Massachusetts studio (exterior view) [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Rand, Harry, "Paul Manship," Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1989, pg. 146.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Keen Kottons

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Bazaars behind Church, Oslo

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Exterior of NHB Near Completion

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
View from across the Mall of the south side of the new United States National Museum building, now the Museum of Natural History, near completion. Scaffolding is still visible on the south entrance within the porch, and the steps are still being constructed.

Water Towers [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Gothic Cottage

Smithsonian American Art Museum

House Detail [drawing] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

Piacenza Home--Front Yard

Smithsonian American Art Museum

My Backyard #1

Smithsonian American Art Museum

My Backyard #2

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Ascent

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Casa de Playa

Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Stairway

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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