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Found 29 Collections

 

Unlikely friendships

"Culture is often difficult to define, but it influences everything from who you are as an individual to how you relate to other people at home and around the world. " from Cultural Conversations (2014)

Cultural conversations have been important to the development of the United States since its inception. To start cultural conversations among my students, I have gathered a collection of artifacts that give a brief history of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. Douglass and Lincoln would ordinarily have not been friends,  but because of their relationship, history was changed forever! Other Friendships worth investigating: WEB DuBois and Woodrow Wilson (as well as William Monroe Trotter), Lyndon B Johnson and Martin Luther King, Jr., Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Banneker, and Eleanor Roosevelt and Mary McLeod Bethune.

#NPGteach

#visiblethinking


Jeryl Payne
25
 

Activity Collection: Botany Field Book

This teaching guide includes a lesson plan originally published as "Smithsonian in Your Classroom." It introduces students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of Smithsonian artists. Also included here is an additional optional resource: "Meet the Artist" to discover more about Smithsonian Botanical Illustrator Alice Tangerini.



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

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Cody Coltharp
15
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with an Artwork

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Once you have examined the artwork and answered the questions, view an archived webinar with a museum educator to compare your interpretation. How does viewing the artwork with the museum label change your interpretation? How did what you noticed in the artwork compare with what the educators shared?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.

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Ashley Naranjo
3
 

Cultural Series: Five Pillars of Islam

What can we learn about people from their cultural artifacts? The Five Pillars of Islam are unifying principles of the faith by which all Muslims abide. They are: Profession of Faith (Shahada), Prayer (Salat), Alms (Zakat), Fasting (Sawm), and Pilgrimage to Mecca (The Hajj). Look through the collection. What's going on? Identify an artifact that represents a pillar. What do you see that makes you say that? Explain what pillar you think it represents, and explain why. Bonus activity: Complete the sorting activity. What did you know about the Five Pillars before you began the activity? Did you learn anything new? What do you think now about observing the Five Pillars?

Tags: Islam, Muslim, religion, Muhammad, object analysis, practice, pilgrimage, hajj, fasting, Ramadan, Shahada, zakat, tithe, salat, prayer, cultural literacy

The original collection and idea was created by Kate Harris, SCLDA.

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Tracie Spinale
26
 

Portrait Analysis: Duke Kahanamoku

In this activity, students will analyze a stamp depicting Duke Kahanamoku to explore his significance in American history and culture. Duke Kahanamoku (1890-1968) transformed the Polynesian pastime of surfing into a worldwide competitive sport.  He also won five Olympic medals in swimming, was an accomplished actor and businessman, and was re-elected sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu for thirteen consecutive terms.  Opportunities to learn more include a photograph of him with Amelia Earhart and her husband, a surfboard he carved, and a Google Doodle created for his 125th birthday.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Duke Kahanamoku's life and achievements, Hawaiian history and culture, and more.  This activity opens with questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and ends with a Project Zero Think / Puzzle / Explore routine; the full portraiture guide and routine instructions are located at the end of the collection.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: surfer, pacific islander, athlete, hawaii, hawai'i

#APA2018

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Tess Porter
11
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