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Found 5,235 Collections

 

Short Hip Hop History

Looking at three videos that speak about the influences of Hip-Hop artists and how hip-hop is used for activism.

#SmithsonianMusic

Amanda Riske
4
 

Teaching Resources: Jazz Music

This teaching collection includes a variety of resources to complement a study of Jazz compositions and performers. Through these lesson plans, sheet music, artworks, and video performances, teachers can introduce the musical evolution of jazz styles and contributions of key performers. Teachers might also introduce musical techniques involved in the creation and performance of jazz.


This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day.

#SmithsonianMusic

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Media, Color, & Identity: George Gershwin as a Lens to Uncover Individual Identity

Inquiry Description

Throughout history, people have represented themselves and others through media (e.g. paintings, film, photos, song, social media, etc.). Artists and individuals make conscious and unconscious choices about how to represent a person using media and color. These representations are open to individual interpretation.

In this inquiry, students  develop awareness of different perceptions and expressive qualities of color through an examination of historical sources. The first formative task entails a student exploration of the attributes of color through the "Interpreting & Communicating Color" task using paint color samples. Students then apply this understanding while analyzing portraiture and various other media through the lens of how artists represent a songwriter, George Gershwin. The second formative task involves students discussing and supporting claims about how Gershwin is represented in a text, The Music in George's Head: George Gershwin Creates Rhapsody in Blue, and in his music and a portrait. Students then write and support claims about how Gershwin is represented in various media forms in the third formative task. The lesson concludes with a summative task during which students determine the best colors and media to represent their own identity within the creation of a self-portrait.

The 2017 NCSS Notable Trade Book, The Music in George's Head: George Gershwin Creates Rhapsody in Blue, is intriguing because the illustrator chose to represent Gershwin in shades of blue. This text is ripe for color analysis. This Gershwin biography provides background knowledge about Gershwin's personality, thus acting as a resource that students may use to develop claims about artist's color choices as representations of Gershwin's identity. After acquiring knowledge of Gershwin's personality traits, students apply perceptions about the expressive qualities of color to various media (portraits, sculpture, photo, etc.). Many of these historical sources are from the National Portrait Gallery, a Smithsonian Institution museum, and represent treasured elements of our national history.

This inquiry will consist of four class periods [approximately].

 

Structure of the Inquiry

NCSS's Theme 4 Individual Development and Identity and the C3 Framework (i.e. D2.His.6.3-5.) expect that students investigate how individual perceptions effect how people are represented throughout history. Throughout the formative tasks, students gradually build skills needed to interpret and communicate about artists' color and media representations of people as well as individual perceptions about color usage within artistic works. Students interpret several portraits, namely, Wormley's 1936 George Gershwin; Auerbach's 1926 Gershwin at the Piano; and a 1934 Gershwin self-portrait. Additionally, students examine other forms of portraiture: Noguchi's 1929 Gershwin sculpture and a 1936 Gershwin photo. After examining these historical sources, students make a determination as to which historical source best represents George Gershwin and provides evidence as to why it is the best representation of Gershwin.

Students are expected to develop their personal identity as related to their time and place in society as stated in NCSS Theme 4 Individual Development and Identity. In the summative task, students apply these understandings to create a new historical source, a self-portrait, by making intentional choices about how to represent themselves through color within media.  

Inquiry Questions for the Lesson:

Compelling Question: What factors influence how individuals are perceived by others and themselves?

Supporting Question: What are the attributes of  color?

Supporting Question: How do media and color effect one's representation of identity?

Supporting Question: How are media and color used to represent George Gershwin's identity?

Supporting Question: What do media and color reveal about you?


These NCSS C3 Framework History Standards are the basis for the lesson content:

D2.His.10.3-5 Compare information provided by different historical sources about the past.

D2.His.13.3-5. Use information about a historical source, including the maker, date, place of origin, intended audience, and purpose to judge the extent to which the source is useful for studying a particular topic.

#SmithsonianMusic

Angel Bestwick
22
 

What makes you say that?: Marian Anderson in Concert at the Lincoln Memorial

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine for interpretation with justification. This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. The strategy is paired with photographs from the National Museum of American History, an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and a video from the Smithsonian Music initiative, featuring a curator from the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Using guided questions, students will look at a single event through multiple media formats.

Tags: William H. Johnson, Robert Scurlock, Marian Anderson, Easter 1939 concert, Lincoln Memorial

#visiblethinking #BecauseOfHerStory #SmithsonianMusic

Ashley Naranjo
5
 

Woody Guthrie: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Woody Guthrie, one of the most important folk composers in American history. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes multiple music recordings, a Smithsonian Magazine article about his legacy, and a podcast episode about his music and relationship with Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how he wanted to be seen, or how others wanted him to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened to his music, does the portrait capture your image of Woody Guthrie? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Guthrie, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, songwriter, oklahoma, protest, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
12
 

Esperanza Spalding: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Esperanza Spalding, a Grammy-winning jazz bassist and singer. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes a video of artist Bo Gehring speaking about his portrait of Spalding and a Smithsonian Magazine article about her curation of an exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having read listened to her music, does the portrait capture your image of Esperanza Spalding? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Esperanza Spalding, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: musician, oregon, American, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
7
 

Selena: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Selena Quintanilla-Pérez, an American singer known as the "queen of Tejano music." Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes videos of educators and curators talking about her life and accomplishments, as well as an outfit she wore during performances.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened to her music, does the portrait capture your image of Selena? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Selena, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, texas, model, fashion designer, entertainer, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
8
 

"Legendary Women's Voices" - Cynthia Erivo & NSO at the Kennedy Center, April 2019

On April 5-6, 2019, the Kennedy Center will host an evening of "Legendary Women's Voices," as performed by Cynthia Erivo and the National Symphony Orchestra. Featuring repertoire by artists ranging from Marian Anderson and Nina Simone to Gladys Knight and Beyoncé, the performances aim to honor a diversity of iconic women musicians. The event is being co-promoted by the Smithsonian Year of Music. Through the Learning Lab, the Smithsonian highlights a collection of artifacts that relate to the musicians featured in the Kennedy Center concerts.

#SmithsonianMusic

Meredith Holmgren
36
 

Bessie Smith: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Bessie Smith, the "Empress of the Blues" and one of the most influential blues singers in history. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes a video clip of Bessie Smith performing "St. Louis Blues" in 1929 and a post from the National Museum of African American History and Culture discussing her and other LGBTQ African Americans of the Harlem Renaissance.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened her music, does the portrait capture your image of Bessie Smith? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Bessie Smith, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, 20s, 30s, American, Tennessee, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
12
 

Access Series: Making Music and Sonic Self-Portraits

This inspiration collection of musical people and music instruments was used for a music-making activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students used GarageBand software to create sonic self-portraits. Prior to the activity, teens were asked about their favorite genres of music, including jazz, blues, classical, rock, pop, rap, and R&B. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program, #SmithsonianMusic

Tracie Spinale
66
 

Comparing Musical Arrangements and Interpretations of "The Star Spangled Banner"

This collection about the National Anthem of the United States includes more than 10 performances of it, the story of Francis Scott Key’s inspiration and the British tune to which he set his lyrics. The suggested instructional strategy is a comparison/contrast exercise, with "Close Listening" questions.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day. #SmithsonianMusic

Ashley Naranjo
18
 

African Americans and the Civil War

This collection highlights the enslaved and free African American perspective and experience during the Civil War with collection objects from the National Museum of African American History and Culture, other Smithsonian units, and relevant media.

Keywords: NMAAHC, NMAAHC Education, African American, Civil War, United States Colored Troops, soldier, war, emancipation, history, primary sources

NMAAHC Education
48
 

Becoming the Historian: Historical Context

Historical thinking skills allow historians to better practice and interpret history. This series teaches students how to develop these skills to become better historians themselves.

This Learning Lab will guide students through the process of defining historical context and practicing employing strategies from an example dealing with the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. 

 Historical context is the background information that informs a deeper understanding of a historical individual, group or event. Historical context is important because it allows historians to better understand history in the ways a historical individual or group understood the world around them, which leads historians to analyze the past more accurately. 

 Keywords: nmaahc, African, American, historical, thinking, skills, context, historical, contextualization, background, 1968, Poor People's Campaign, history, interpret, analyze

NMAAHC Education
16
 

Mars

A current elementary or middle school student will most likely be the first human to step foot on Mars. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will investigate the plans to send humans to Mars and the ongoing research into water and the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

October 21, 2015


This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Katelyn Schmidt
28
 

Education Trunk: Basque Music and Dance

This collection supports the Educational Trunk outreach program provided by the Basque Museum & Cultural Center. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
9
 

Buoyancy

Betty Jo Moore
1
 

Grace Hopper & The First Computer Bug

A collection about Grace Hopper to use with teaching about historic and inspiring women figures in Computer Science. 

macbetthh
6
 

Spacesuits: Working Under Pressure

A collection of articles, images and videos about the function and necessary components of a spacesuit.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
19
 

Antique and Vintage Fastener Collection

The Scaglione Antique and Vintage Office Museum

This collection features  paper fasteners manufactured between the years 1889 and 1955. It is one of the the most complete collections of antique and vintage paper fasteners in the world. It is interesting to note that some of the machines in this collection have not been seen in years. 

Paper fasteners have been around since the early 1850’s therefore, we have a great selection of antique and vintage machines for review and examination. The development of fasteners really took off in the early 1900’s and improvements followed. Many machines produced today are based on designs dating the early 1930's.

Today, we refer to this office machine as a stapler. But early paper fasteners included the Eyelet machine and pin fasteners.

Even now, some examples are proving to be more desirable to collectors and are harder to find. 

When examining the early machines, it is easy to see these machines are historic. They were developed and manufactured during the mechanical revolution, Simple in design yet dependable.  These  19th century and early 20th century designs are what you would expect of the era and this is where the concept of paper fasteners began. 


Curtis Scaglione
102
 

Basque Immigration

Explore Basque Immigration and Diaspora. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
9
 

Slow Looking: Untitled, by El Anatsui

In this collection, students will explore an artwork by El Anatsui, a contemporary artist whose recent work addresses global ideas about the environment, consumerism, and the social history and memory of the "stuff" of our lives. After looking closely and exploring the artwork using an adapted version of Project Zero's "Parts, Purposes, and Complexities" routine, students will create a "diamante" poem using their observations of the artwork and knowledge they gained about El Anatsui's artistic influences. Additional resources about El Anatsui, how to look at African Art, and Project Zero Thinking Routines are located at the end of the collection.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: nigeria, african art, textile, poetry, creative writing, analysis

Tess Porter
20
 

(re)Telling Our Stories--We Are Seeds!

On a good day, my students feel as though our country is trying to bury them. On a bad day, they feel as though their stories are being told for them--ugly stories where they and their families become murderers, rapists and drug dealers. 

The mission of the National Portrait Gallery is to tell the story of America by portraying the people who shape the nation’s history, development and culture. In a sense, NPG decides who is America, and if my students walked through the gallery, they would be told quite clearly that they are not a part of this country.

This collection and connected lesson ideas are grounded in a quote from one of Kehinde Wiley's models in Economy of Grace, a documentary filled with incredibly powerful women who don't get a single mention in the IMBD credits.

"You don't have to be a super model or someone important to be seen."

I strive to help my students be seen and tell their stories.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #kehindewiley #npgteach #theytriedtoburyus

#weareseeds

Charles Sanderson
25
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The visual arts can be an entry point to literacy in the classroom.  Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.  Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and critical thinkers!  

Learn more about distance learning opportunities from the National Museum of African Art by visiting the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC).

Keywords: NJPSA

Deborah Stokes
88
 

New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Planning Tool

Using a sample lesson "The Blues and The Great Depression" provided by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) as a model, this collection demonstrates how the Smithsonian Learning Lab can be a useful tool to curate digital resources that support a lesson for arts integration.

In this lesson, students will learn about the structure and content of the blues using songs from the 1930s and the Great Depression.Students will brainstorm circumstances of the Great Depression and use those ideas to create an original blues song from the point of view of someone living during the Great Depression.

Essential questions: 

● How does blues music reflect the challenges of poverty for the African-American experience during the Great Depression?
● How do images and songs reflect the emotions of the African-American experience during the Great Depression?


The original lesson was created by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) and included in their Arts Integration User Guide for NJ Educators and Practitioners, starting on p. 90 (http://njpsa.org/documents/EdLdrsAsSchol2018/artsintegrationWorkbook2018.pdf).

Ashley Naranjo
24
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