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Enter If You Will: The People's Design Award

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson in which students analyze submissions to the Cooper-Hewitt's People's Design Award, conduct Internet research to learn about the design process, and create their own designs to submit.

The Design Process: Paper-Cutting

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Activity in which students come to understand the design process by working as a group to produce themed paper-cut designs.

National Zoological Park�_�Home Page

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The Smithsonian National Zoological Park main website is your place to find information on the National Zoo's animals, research, exhibits, events, and much more.

Harvest Ceremony: Beyond the Thanksgiving Myth (PDF)

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Information sheet for use in lessons on the first Thanksgiving. Includes which Native peoples met the Europeans in 1621, the harvest celebration, the Wampanoag today, the importance of corn, and a Johnny cake activity.

National Museum of the American Indian Bookshop

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Bookshop for the National Museum of the American Indian. Includes children's books (many based on exhibits past or present), NMAI editions, CDs, and DVDs.

Great Women of Our Pasts Homepage

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Parent's guide designed to teach children about women's history. Focused on the book, Seven Brave Women, this module includes reading questions, hands-on activities, and recommended reading for additional exploration.

Travis Panorama

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Section of the online exhibit West Point in the Making of America featuring a dramatic recreation of artist William D.T. Travis' panorama commissioned by veterans of the Army of the Cumberland to memorialize the career of General William S. Rosecrans and his campaigns in Kentucky and Tennessee.

Ocean Portal

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Website inspires awareness, understanding, and stewardship of the world's oceans. Here you can find comprehensive information and resources, including ocean news, photo essays, videos, ocean blog, research updates, articles, species entries in the encyclopedia of life, connected stories and websites by category, podcasts, articles and interactives on marine evolution throughout time, articles on current conservation issues and initiatives, and an educators section.

Symbols in a Story: What's What?

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Interactive in which players go deep inside the painting "Achelous and Hercules" by American regionalist Thomas Hart Benton. The artist set the Greek myth in rural Missouri, giving it a new figurative meaning. The activity introduces the literary devices of symbol, simile, and metaphor.

The Sant Ocean Hall Family Guide

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This printable guide provides a map showing the Sant Ocean Hall and activities available there. This brochure is perfect for planning a family trip to the National Museum of Natural History.

Sant Ocean Hall Galleries

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Through this interactive website, explore images and essays based on themes from the Sant Ocean Hall's galleries at the National Museum of Natural History: exploration, native Pacific cultures, whales, shores, shallows, and the deep ocean.

Think Pair Share Routine: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine for active reasoning and explanation from Project Zero. It encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. Involves posing a question to students, asking them to take a few minutes of thinking time and then turning to a nearby student to share their thoughts.

THINK PAIR SHARE ROUTINE

A routine for active reasoning and explanation

Think Pair Share involves posing a question to students, asking them to take a few minutes of thinking time and then turning to a nearby student to share their thoughts.

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. The Think Pair Share routine promotes understanding through active reasoning and explanation. Because students are listening to and sharing ideas, Think Pair Share encourages students to understand multiple perspectives.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Think Pair Share can be applied at any given moment in the classroom. For example, when approaching a solution, solving a math problem, before a science experiment, or after reading a passage or chapter of a book you may ask students to take a moment to think about a particular question or issue and then turn to their neighbor and share their thoughts. Sharing can also be done in small groups. Some times you will want to have pairs or groups summarize their ideas for the whole class.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using the routine?

When first introducing the routine, teachers may want to scaffold students' paired conversations by reminding them to take turns, listen carefully and ask questions of one another. One way to ensure that students listen to each other is to tell students that you will be calling on individuals to explain their partners thinking, as opposed to telling their own thoughts.

Encourage students to make their thinking visible by asking them to write or draw their ideas before and/or after sharing. Journals can also be useful. Student pairs can report one another's thoughts to the class and a list of ideas can be created in the classroom.

Think / Puzzle / Explore: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine that sets the stage for deeper inquiry from Project Zero. It activates prior knowledge, generates ideas and curiosity and sets the stage for deeper inquiry. Uses questions, such as, "What do you think you know about this topic?", "What questions or puzzles do you have?", and "What does the topic make you want to explore?"

THINK / PUZZLE / EXPLORE

A routine that sets the stage for deeper inquiry

1. What do you think you know about this topic?

2. What questions or puzzles do you have?

3. What does the topic make you want to explore?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine activates prior knowledge, generates ideas and curiosity and sets the stage for deeper inquiry.

Application: When and where can it be used?

This routine works especially well when introducing a new topic, concept or theme in the classroom. It helps students take stock of what they already know and then pushes students to identify puzzling questions or areas of interest to pursue. Teachers can get a good sense of where students are on a conceptual level and, by returning to the routine over the course of study, they can identify development and progress. The third question is useful in helping students lay the ground work for independent inquiry.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

With the introduction of new topic--for example, earth, leaves, fractions, Buddhism--the class can engage in the routine together to create a group list of ideas. Between each phase of the routine, that is with each question, adequate time needs to be given for individuals to think and identify their ideas. You may even want to have students write down their individual ideas before sharing them out as a class. In some cases, you may want to have students carry out the routine individually on paper or in their heads before working on a new area.

Keep a visible record of students' ideas. If you are working in a group, ask students to share some of their thoughts and collect a broad list of ideas about the topic on chart paper. Or students can write their individual responses on post-it notes and later add them to a class list of ideas.

Note that it is common for students to have misconceptions at this point--include them on the list so all ideas are available for consideration after further study. Students may at first list seemingly simplistic ideas and questions. Include these on the whole class list but push students to think about things that are truly puzzling or interesting to them.

Guillermo Velázquez y los Leones Speak on The Roots of Huapango Arribeño

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
On August 26th, Smithsonian Folkways released Serrano de Corazón (Highlander at Heart), an album rooted in the Mexican musical tradition huapango arribeño as interpreted by Guillermo Velázquez and his Leones de la Sierra de Xichú.

Mickey Hart interview

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Preserves and furthers the Grateful Dead percussionist’s endeavor to cross borders and expand musical horizons.

Tapestry of the Times - Episode 5

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Songs from New Orleans street singer Snooks Eaglin, Calypso from Trinidad’s Mighty Sparrow, the sounds of Brazilian capoeiristas, music from mountains of Puerto Rico, and lush layers of melody from Zimbabwe. Plus: a showcase of female vocal talents.

Artificial Anatomy: Collection

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online gallery of more than30 papier-mache anatomical models of humans, animals, and plants from the museums Artificial Anatomy Collection. Targets grades 6-12.

Life in a Sod House Homepage

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Parent's guide with recommended readings and hands-on activities designed to teach children about life on the prairie and in sod houses. This type of life became prevalent after the 1862 Homestead Act, which offered free land to those willing to settle on the frontier.

The Water Nearby

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson using Google Maps to first find the class' school, then locate and learn about the closest body of water to the school. By working with maps, students build visual literacy and begin to develop geographical awareness. Part of the resource 'Life on the Water.'

Children Write to the President

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online activity analyzing primary source letters that were written to presidents by children and answering questions based on what they read. Part of the online exhibit, The American Presidency: A Glorious Burden.

Drawing the Western Frontier: James E. Taylor Album

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Drawings, photographs, and newspaper clippings from Illustrator James E. Taylor (1839 - 1901) who served to popularize stereotypes of the Western frontier during the post-Civil War years.. Includes sections: Indians, Battle of the Washita, Meeker Tragedy, Gold Mining, Mexican Life, and Frontier Life and a general biography.

Bike Rack Remix

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students design a public bicycle rack for their community or school. The project gives a real-world application to basic math and geometry.

Mail by Missile

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Slideshow presentation where a curator describes an experimental mail service from 1959 using missiles to carry the mail. This was intended to show the Russians that our military capabilities were so advanced they could be used for peacetime operations.

Black Wings: African American Pioneer Aviators

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Students examine photographic portraits and biographies to learn about the history of African Americans in the field of aviation. This set of four lessons is divided into grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. The students portray the aviators in drawing, painting, or writing.
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