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Yalalag, Tape 6 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

On lable "Santa Rosa". Includes a church service with drum and flute music, as well as band music later in the recording.

Work Songs (Program #16)

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Harold Courlander is an important figure in the history of Folkways. Well known in some circles for winning the case against Alex Haley, whose novel Roots plagiarized from Courlander’s novel The African, I think of Courlander as the early guiding spirit for what he and my father called the Ethnic series, which is the vast catalogue of what we now call world music. This time, I thought we’d feature an album Courlander put together in 1956 that documents the sensibilities he brought to this work in the immediate post-War period. Called World of Man: Volume 1, His Work, a title that situates it in the non-inclusive language of that time, the album is nonetheless a wonderful worldwide journey through the world of human labour. We’ll add other work songs from around the world in the show.

Woody Guthrie

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Rare outtakes and stories from Smithsonian Folkways archivist Jeff Place give new meaning to the life and music of American folk icon Woody Guthrie and his relationship with Folkways Records.

Woodrow Wilson portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Frank Aucella, executive director at the Woodrow Wilson House, discusses a portrait of Wilson by John Christen Johansen, on view at the National Portrait Gallery in the exhibition "America's Presidents"

Willie Herrón interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Willie Herrón, one of the founding members of the Chicano Avant-Garde collective, ASCO, criticized the "Los Four" exhibition at L.A. County Museum of Art in 1974, which displayed graffiti infused murals inside the museum. In an interview with Jeffrey Rangel, he recalled how the "Los Four" exhibition set the stage for an ASCO interventionist performance.

William T. Sherman portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Trevor Plante, chief of Reference at the National Archives, talks about Union General William T. Sherman (1820-1891)

Willem de Kooning, reconsidered, [sound recording] / co-sponsored by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Archives of American Art, 1993

Archives of American Art
4 sound cassettes (90 min. each) : analog.

The proceedings of a scholarly symposium held in conjunction with the Hirshhorn Museum exhibition, "Willem de Kooning from the Hirshhorn Museum Collection," October 21, 1993-January 9, 1994.

Speakers include Judith Zilczer, Judith Wolfe, David Cateforis, Carter Ratcliff, and Stephen Polcari.

Will Kaufman, author talk

National Portrait Gallery
"Woody Guthrie, American Radical (Music in American Life)" -- author Will Kaufman discusses his book and plays songs by woody Guthrie.

When You Wish Upon a Star

National Air and Space Museum

You probably know that shooting stars aren’t really stars, but what ARE you seeing? Emily, Matt, and Nick give a download on why meteor showers occur, when’s the best time to watch, and what you’re looking at (spoiler: most meteors are A LOT smaller than you think). So bundle up, grab your headphones, and get a crash-course on everything you need to know while enjoying the Ursid shower on December 22nd.

We’re hard at work on new episodes! AirSpace will be back with SEASON 2 in March! Can’t wait that long? Check out our instagram @airspacepodcast for behind-the-scenes content!

What’s He Building?

National Air and Space Museum

Alt title: ADAM SAVAGE IS IN THIS EPISODE! Today we’re talking about a really cool project that brought together one former-Mythbuster, a couple of Smithsonian units, and makers across the country to reimagine an incredible piece of Apollo engineering.  The hatch (aka door) on the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia is SUPER complex and basically irresistible if you’re into solving mechanical puzzles – so much so that master builders Adam Savage and Jen Schachter wanted to recreate it with the help of a few dozen friends. They brought together 44 artists and engineers from across the country to fabricate individual components of the hatch using 3D-scan data from the Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office. Then Adam and team assembled it live at the Museum in DC during the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. On this episode we hear what happens when lasers, power tools, and a live studio audience (safely) collide!

P.S. Want to build your own Apollo 11 hatch? Visit 3d.si.edu/apollo11cmhatch to view the 3D model and download the .stl files and drawings used by the Project Egress team. Post your photos and tag #ProjectEgress!

Wax cylinder recordings of American Indian songs and dances, ca. 1910

National Anthropological Archives
Donated by Steve Elliot. From the estate of Robert N. Wilkinson, a Boulder, Colorado radio station owner and collector of old radios and phonographs. There is no provenance documentation. Wilkinson told the donor that he bought an Edison cylinder player in Arizona and the store owner included the cylinders in the purchase.

This collection is comprised of thirteen (13) original recordings of American Indian songs and dances, recorded on two-minute Edison Blanks wax cylinders. Eight of the cylinders are in pristine condition. Two are cracked and cannot be played. Contents are marked on individual cylinders in pencil or black ink: 1) The last Owl Dance; 2) Two flute songs; 3) Sioux flute 2 loves; 4) Sioux love song; 5) Kiowa love songs; 6) Sirecha Dance; 7) Flute love lullaby; 8) Flute on the bridge; 9) War dance; 10) Buffalo dance; 11) Song before fight; 12) Indian flute. a love song, played by Turkey Leggs. (Cheyene); 13) Owl Dance song.

War Dance Songs and Veterans Songs, September 18, 1966 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Recorded for Ty Stewart. Part Two. MPM tape 4 includes: 1. War Dance Songs; 2. Veterans' Songs.

Walking on the Moon Part 2

National Air and Space Museum

Next week is the 50th anniversary of our first steps on the Moon! In our last exciting episode, we explored all the science the Apollo astronauts performed on the lunar surface. In part two, we’re talking about the important science still happening with Apollo Moon rocks here on Earth a half-century later. Of all the 842 pounds of lunar material the astronauts collected up there, three samples were sealed away for scientists to study far in the future. And the future is now! We’ll speak to two scientists from NASA Goddard who will be working with the heretofore sealed samples, which are still in pristine, untouched condition from when astronauts of yesteryear plucked them off our nearest celestial neighbor. And Emily speaks to Lunar geologist Dr. Jennifer Whitten who’s working on a proposal to send a rover back to the Moon to carry on Apollo’s legacy of lunar exploration. Lunar science of the future happens now!

Walking on the Moon Part 1

National Air and Space Museum

50 years ago this July, humans set foot on the Moon for the first time. You probably know the highlights – Kennedy’s moonshot challenge, Armstrong’s first small steps, three astronauts returned safely to Earth – but there was more to the Apollo program than getting there and back. When we landed Americans on the Moon, there was a lot we didn’t know about our nearest celestial neighbor. Would the astronauts sink into the lunar dust like quicksand? Would they encounter extraterrestrial germs and bring them back to infect the Earth? What would could rocks and dirt (regolith, actually) tell us about how the Moon formed? To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landing, AirSpace examines what we knew then, what we know now, and what mysteries of lunar science still remain. And we’ll admit, we’re just a *little *excited about the upcoming anniversary. So much so, this is part ONE of TWO.

Walker Hancock interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Walker Kirtland Hancock (1901-1998) was a prominent sculptor who taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from 1929 to 1967. Hancock was drafted into the Army in 1942 and initially trained as a medic. After being transferred to military intelligence at the Pentagon, Hancock requested to join the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives (MFAA) section of the U.S. Army where he felt he could do the most good In this audio clip, Hancock talks about locating and recovering looted art repositories found in the salt mines.

WSZD Radio music, popular songs, August 14, 1974 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Volta Laboratory Experimental Sound Recording, Green Wax on Brass Disc

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C., about 1884. The wax, poured into a brass holder, has been dyed a bright green. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2011. Content summary: Hamlet’s soliloquy Content transcript (17 seconds): “To be, or not to be: that is the question. Whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing end them? To die, to sleep…” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79. Steven E. Schoenherr, “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone,” Wile, Raymond R. "The Development of Sound Recording at the Volta Laboratory," Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal 21, No. 2, 1990, pp. 208-225.

Volta Laboratory Experimental Recording

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C., on 11 March 1885. The recording process involved focusing a beam of light, projecting it through a liquid, and causing sound waves to interrupt both the light and the liquid to expose a prepared photographic plate. The recording, which starts at the center and spirals outward, is of variable density, that is the areas of exposure vary in density according to volume and pitch of the sound recorded. Process is described in U.S. Patent 341,213 awarded Alexander Graham Bell, Chichester A. Bell, and Charles Sumner Tainter on 4 May 1886. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2011. Content summary: “Mary had a little lamb” Content transcript (37 seconds): “ [?]…Sumner Tainter and H. G. Rogers. This eleventh day of March, eighteen hundred and eighty-five. [trilled r sound] [indistinct phrase] Mary had a little lamb, and its fleece was white as snow [alternatively, black as soot?] . And wherever Mary went…Oh [indistinct word]. Mary had a little lamb, and its fleece was white as snow [alternatively, black as soot?]. And wherever Mary went, the little lamb was sure to go. How is this for high? [trill]” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79. Steven E. Schoenherr, “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone,” Wile, Raymond R. "The Development of Sound Recording at the Volta Laboratory," Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal 21, No. 2, 1990, pp. 208-225.

Visionary modernist impresario : a look at Arthur B. Davies and his world, 1900-1928 : panel discussion, 1981 March 27

Archives of American Art
3 sound cassettes.

A panel discussion conducted 1981 March 27, sponsored jointly by the Archives of American Art and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston.

The participants are: Robert F. Brown, Charles Eldredge, Elizabeth Johns, Garnett McCoy, Nancy Miller, Gwendolyn Owens, and Elizabeth Sussman.

Vietnamese songs and instrumental music [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Information transcribed from box: Side I stereo 3 3/4 ;1. Jerai Gongs (moving past mikes 0-73; 2. Jerai gongs (with singing at 150, 73-214; 3. Jerai zylophone 214-246; 4. Jerai violin 246-276 5. Jerai man singing 278-301; 6. Jerai group singing 303-362. Side 2 Vietnamese song (co Nhat) 1. 600- First with guitar accom. Second, third with 10 stringed inst.; 2. Vietnamese Modern -881. Side 2 BLANK

Vernon Jordan, Living Self-Portrait

National Portrait Gallery
Interview with Vernon Jordan, Civil Rights Leader

Ventureño and Island Chumash Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Side 1: Man translating Ventureño into English; Side 2: Vocabulary with Santa Cruz dialect to English, given to man by Mr. Callenburg/Cowdenburg in employ of the Smithsonian Institute, to compare with Ventureño (audio speeds up throughout side)

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Sides 1 and 2: Translating Ventureño into English.
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