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Found 1,022 Collections

 

William Faulkner: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of William Faulkner, an American author and Nobel Prize laureate. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created (such as the caricature, stamp, etc.).
  • Having read one of his stories, does the portrait capture your image of William Faulkner? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of William Faulkner, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: mississippi, ms, the sound and the fury, writer

Tess Porter
6
 

Willi Smith

Willi Smith (1958-1987)

Willi Smith was an African American fashion designer whose street wear line known as WilliWear was and experiment of democracy in fashion. WilliWear designs were known to be bold, blurring the lines between high and low culture, and his work often involved collaborations with other artists and designers. The openly gay designer's career was cut short when he died in 1987 from complications from HIV/AIDS.

This collection is a representation of the 2020 exhibition Willi Smith: Street Couture at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, which features over 200 pieces from Smith’s work and career and his numerous collaborations with artists, dancers, choreographers, graphic designers, architects, and more. The works on view include video, sketches, patterns, photographs, and garments.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
67
 

Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa?

Celia Cruz celebrated her Cuban American identity as one of the first women salsa singers. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa?,Mincy, a student, speaks with Ariana A. Curtis, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
23
 

who am I

Search for your personal meaning in life. Who are you as an individual person? How do you connect as  a member of your community? your country? the world?

louise brady
11
 

Which One Doesn't Belong

This collection includes digital museum resources and models the listening and speaking strategy Which one Doesn't Belong.  The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. 




#EthnicStudies


Jennifer Smith
8
 

What Would Frida Wear?

This collection provides students the opportunity to dress artist Frida Kahlo in traditional Mexican garb that she favored, the huipil and the quechquemitl.

Frida Kahlo was born in Coyoacan on July 6, 1907.  Thoughout her life Frida was a fierce nationalist and a vocal socialist. As a reflection of her beliefs, Frida often wore the indigenous clothing of Mexico.  This can be seen both in photographs of her and in her paintings.  Frida completed 143 paintings during her lifetime, 55 of which are self-portraits.  Many of these self-portaits are among her most famous works.  

Most of the costumes Frida wears were hand-woven, as well as hand embroidered and stitched.  The colors and many of the symbols used in her work are clearly influenced by Mexican tradition.

She died in 1954.

#LatinoHAC

Arizona State Museum
25
 

What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S.

This playlist on "What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S." is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print word doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create a work of art. Modify the lessons as needed.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Task and Learning Check In).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Word doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
39
 

What Makes a First Lady?

In this collection, students will answer the question "What Makes a First Lady?" by comparing and analyzing images of various First Ladies. They will also think critically about their definition of the First Lady as compared to that of the President and the differences in medium (painting, photography, video) artists use to represent a First Lady. One of the final activities will require students to find an image of a First Lady not shown in the collection to test their definitions.

This activity is based on the "Reading Portraiture" Guide for Educators created by the National Portrait Gallery. The guide can be found at the end of the collection.

Alexander Graves
12
 

What is the legacy of the 19th century whaling industry?

A collection designed to introduce students to the 19th century whaling industry- one of the biggest industries of the 19th century and the industry which supported industrialization.

#TeachingInquiry

Erin Becker
42
 

What is Kwanzaa?

In this activity, students will learn about the background and cultural significance of the holiday Kwanzaa through an an analysis of various resources:

  • The collection begins with several images related to Kwanzaa. By looking through each of the resources, students can gain a deeper understanding of the holiday. Each image contains text about different parts of Kwanzaa and quiz questions to encourage further thoughts and reflections. 
  • A resource from the Kwanzaa Planning Committee is featured after these resources to further discuss practices and principles related to the holiday.
  • Then, they will compare and contrast them with an image representing Christmas and another representing Hanukkah.
  • The final activity has the student upload a separate image and explore how he or she would use that image to describe Kwanzaa to someone.
  • The final resource includes an article from the Smithsonian Magazine that you can use to discuss the history of Kwanzaa with your class.
  • The resources include multiple choice and discussion questions.

To read more information about Kwanzaa, please read the following official Kwanzaa website set up by the African American Cultural Center in Los Angeles, California: (http://www.officialkwanzaawebsite.org/symbols.shtm...).

Tags: holidays, history, culture, African American culture, African American history, American history, American culture

Alexander Graves
14
 

What is art? #TeachingInquiry

1. Do you think art is universal in its qualities and nature?

2. WHY is art created?

3. Who decides what is art and what is not art?

Kaavya Lakshman
5
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

What do you see? Using the lens of art to discover hidden history

2017 NCHE Presentation- Lash and Rickman

Stephanie Lash
17
 

What do you see? Using the lens of art to discover hidden history

2017 NCHE Presentation- Lash and Rickman

jorjan woodward
17
 

Well Behaved Women Rarely Become Famous

A collection of portraits of women that defied conventions of their day. Portraits chosen for this collection could lead to a discussion on the evolution of feminism in the US.  It includes several learning to look strategies.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#npgteach

Kimmel Kozak
23
 

Water, Art and Greek Mythology: Achelous and Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules", a supplemental picture guide to the story, a non-fiction article about fresh water from Readworks, and a supplemental worksheet.


Tags: greece, #SAAMTeach , water

Taylor Hummell
6
 

Walt Whitman: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Walt Whitman, an American poet, essayist, and journalist. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  Also includes "A Close, Intimate Look at Walt Whitman," an article about the final portrait in this collection that may be used as a lesson extension.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how he wanted to be seen, or how others wanted him to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having read one of his poems, does the portrait capture your image of Walt Whitman? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Walt Whitman, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: new york, ny, leaves of grass, humanist, writer

Tess Porter
9
 

Voyage of Discovery: Lewis & Clark explore Louisiana.

Images related to the Corps of Discovery. Most people think of the Lewis and Clark Expedition as one of geographic exploration. However, President Jefferson charged them to study ethnography, biology, zoology, meteorology, botany and geology. They were required to make detailed maps of their travels and keep a journal about their experiences. Sculptures, paintings and other forms of artwork have been included to illustrate the many interpretations of Lewis and Clark.
Arthur Glaser
38
 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Take a close look at the portraits and objects within “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. “Votes for Women” outlines the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. This Learning Module highlights figures such as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul, but also sheds light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote).

#NPGteach

#BecauseOfHerStory

Nicole Vance
46
 

Voices of Social Justice

In Voices of Social Justice, students will learn about some of the major figures who struggled to obtain civil rights for disenfranchised or marginalized groups. They will listen to stories of social justice and analyze portraits of individuals who broke barriers——from key nineteenth-century reformers to modern leaders—and will likely be encouraged to consider how they, too, can become civically engaged.

#NPGteach

Briana White
19
 

Voices and Votes - Power of the Press

The press and media have influenced America even before it was a country. The goal of this learning lab is to show the effect media has played on our democracy. It is also important to understand the bias that media and press can have on us everyday. Realizing this influence can make all of us better citizens.

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

Visualizing Guns Violence

At Rutgers University-Newark and within the Graphic Design Program, we offer two courses that focus on community-based (the Design Consortium) and research-oriented (Visual Means) activities. These classes are part of a larger initiative, and art incubator called Express Newark, where community and the university interact, collaborate and co-create.

In addition to the DC and VM courses, we offer an advanced design studio course that focuses on unique design applications through the use of the letterpress printing process, also located at Express Newark. This coming spring, I will be teaching the letterpress course, and in the following fall, I will teach the Visual Means course. Within both classes, I will be looking to develop different ways of visualizing gun violence.

Gun violence is one of the most critical and complex issues we currently face in the United States. Rutgers University has recently created the New Jersey’s Center on Gun Violence. The center’s mission looks to “conduct interdisciplinary research on the causes, consequences, and solutions to gun-related violence while respecting the rights of legal, safe gun ownership and use.” Within the Visual Means course, I plan to work with researchers from this center on developing ways of visualizing the complicated and overwhelming data disconnect between research and public understanding of gun rights, safety, and violence.

What I plan to do with this Learning Lab is to use it as a repository of images, concepts, facts, texts, and web-based information. In the coming months, I will develop a pedagogical approach that weaves together methods of research, visualization, and implementation into various applications of visual communication and graphic form. The Learning Lab will grow as our knowledge about this subject increases and while documenting our process of research, visualization, and implementation.

Research
Step 1 - Learning Lab
We will use the Learning Lab as a repository for our impressions and image collections that show the different ways in which guns have been woven into the mythology of America and seen in our collective culture. Using different lenses such as art, film, photography, sculpture, advertising, satirical cartoons, comics, pop culture, propaganda, and protest, my students and I will attempt to take apart and reconstruct our understanding of the many issues surrounding this divisive topic. 

Visualization and typographic experimentation
Step 2 - Weather Report
Dan Friedman, American, 1945–1995
While teaching at Yale University, Dan Friedman developed a teaching method that is still used in many schools today—the Weather Report. Through a series of detailed parameters, students will be asked to create different permutations that experiment with various interpretations and hierarchies. As students advance through this assignment, the limitations are slowly lifted, and students begin to generate solutions that are more and more expressive, dynamic, and experimental. Using this method, students will experiment with various hierarchies and typographic solutions—setting the stage for the letterpress printing process. 

Implementation 
Step 3 - Letterpress process 
Working with content generated from our research, relevant information, thought-provoking content, quotes, or statistics, students will explore various methods of experimenting with typographic structure and syntax. Using the Learning Lab, students will be exposed to the dynamic work of the Futurists, Constructivists, the Bauhaus, late Modernists, and the explosive typography of the New Wave designers.

Designers would include:

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Italian, 1876–1944

The Futurists were known (amongst other things) for the emotive and expressive typography.

El Lissitzky, Russian, 1890–1941
Russian Constructivism who experimented with developing a universal language based on simple shapes and reductive color.

Ladislav Sutnar, Czechoslovakian, 1897–1976
Sutnar’s visual communication often explains complex information and concepts unambiguously and with a spartan efficiency. The Constructivist brought great structure and organization to their typographic messages through minimal means in an attempt to generate a universal visual vocabulary.

Herbert Bayer, Austrian, 1900–1985
Jan Tschichold, German, 1902–1974
Max Bill, German, 1908–1994
At the Bauhaus and through its influences, designers brought together various conceptual approaches to the organization and implementation of articulate typographic applications.

Alvin Lustig, American, 1915–1955
American designer Alvin Lustig (along with Paul Rand, Bradbury Thompson, Lester Beall, Ladislav Sutnar, and others) was instrumental in developing a mature, Modern approach inspired by Europe to American graphic design and typography.

Wolfgang Weingart, German, 1941–
Teaches at the Basel School of Design and separating himself from some of Late Modernist’s more restrictive characteristics while redefining for himself an expressive typographic approach through experimentation and practice.

April Greiman, American, 1948–
Inspired by Armin Hofmann and Wolfgang Weingart and her experiences in Europe at the Basel School of Design, Greiman brought a fresh and unique perspective to graphic design within the United States.

Bruce Licher, American, 1958–
American typographer and letterpress designer that works within the traditions of letterpress printing while pushing the edges of typography, unique form, and graphic design applications.


Professor Ned Drew
Graphic Design Faculty
Rutgers University-Newark

Founding Director of The Design Consortium & XPress | Center for Typography initiatives at Express Newark

Co-Founder
BRED | a collaborative design lab
www.brednation.com
Instagram: bred_letterpress



 

 

Ned Drew
137
 

Visualizing Democracy

This Learning Lab complements the National Portrait Gallery's student program, Visualizing Democracy. 

Students will visualize democracy from the colonial era to the 21st century by analyzing portraits of major figures who played a critical role—as government officials, engaged citizens, or both—in creating a democratic society for the United States. Students will investigate how portraiture can convey democratic ideals and how, as a cultural institution housed in a historic building, the National Portrait Gallery has been and continues to be relevant to American democracy.

#NPGteach


Kita McCord
19
25-48 of 1,022 Collections