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Found 2,016 Collections

 

Subject: Activism

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to activism, protests, marches, and reform movements. 

See the Learning Lab collection, Annie Appelfor additional photographs of the Occupy Protests and Disasters for refugees. For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords (subject): protest, march, anti-, pro-, activism, citizenship, reform, demonstration, marchers, political movement, political discontent, anti-war, Vietnam War, Occupy Protest, Occupy Movement, women's vote, suffrage, boycott, impeachment, segregation, Rhodesia, genocide, riot, racism, gay rights, marriage equality, anti-fascism, prohibition, abortion

Keyword (photography): gelatin silver print, press print, photojournalism, documentary photography, fine art photography, mutoscope poster, stereoview, stereograph


Hayley Snyder
75
 

Collisions in Portraiture

Collisions in Portraiture highlights the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture to reveal what happens when cultures collide. By analyzing portraiture, students will consider how cultural collisions are visualized from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries. Students will explore the powerful contributions to the history and culture of the United States through portraiture.

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to: 

  • Examine how modern and contemporary artists use portraiture to reveal aspects of a sitter’s individual, community/cultural, and national identity. 
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what one can learn about the sitter through these components. 
  • Discuss the artistic choices that portrait artists make and consider how such decisions can reveal the artists’ viewpoints and also influence the viewers’ understanding of the sitters’ identity. 
  • Use the museum’s collection as a gateway to investigating and exploring of the visualization of colliding cultures.

#NPGteach

Keywords

Portraiture, Collisions, Harriet Tubman, Civil War, Stonewall, Roger Shimomura, Chief Joseph, Robert Rauschenberg, United Farm Workers

Nicole Vance
44
 

Formats and Processes: Cartes-de-visite

#nmahphc

This is a selection of cartes-de-visite from the Photographic History Collection.

The sitters and photographers in this Learning Lab collection are well-known, lesser known, and unidentified. There are a number of photographs that are not portraits, including a stereoview of a cartes-de-visite studio.

Learning Lab collections, Seville CDV Collection and Photo Albums contain additional cartes-de-visite.

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: CDV, carte de visite, cartes de visite, portraiture, studio portrait, collectible photography, celebrity photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
120
 

Dinosaurs are DINO-mite!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring dinosaurs. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about dinosaurs as well as explore PBS EON videos about dinosaurs. Families can learn about these prehistoric animals and consider all the evidence scientists have uncovered. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
45
 

Let's Make and Play: USA Collage

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a collage that represents what America means to you. Look at the following Smithsonian resources for inspiration, then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of the symbols, icons, and traditions that represent the United States of America. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
17
 

Let's Make and Play: No Place Like Home

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a model of your home and a three-dimensional map of your neighborhood. Look at the following Smithsonian resources for inspiration, then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of location and direction within their neighborhood. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
16
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 4

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the fourth in a series of five created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to May 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

In this session, held online while we are all home social distancing in the time of COVID-19, we will

* examine how immigrant origin youth may be experiencing the epidemic

* experiment with a set of revised socio-emotional thinking routines, and

* gather your input about the ways in which Re-imagining Migration together with the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the National Gallery of Art can support you as you prepare to engage students in digital learning.

#ReImaginingMigration

Re-imagining Migration
29
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Culturally Responsive Teaching with Students

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African Art to support culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Viral Histories: Community Organizing in America's Chinatowns

What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Max Leung, creator of the San Francisco Peace Collective, a volunteer civilian patrol group in San Francisco's Chinatown. Max discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on San Francisco's Chinatown community and how we can organize for our neighbors in the middle of a pandemic. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Max's interview by providing additional information about how Asian American communities have organized in the past and the present during COVID-19. As you explore the resources in this collection and reflect on Max's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection and discussion: What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
20
 

Viral Histories: Asian American Resistance and Resilience

What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and creator of "Stop AAPI Hate," about the impacts of COVID-19 and the rise of anti-Asian racism. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Prof. Jeung's interview by providing additional information about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Yellow Peril rhetoric from the 19th century, as well as moments of community resilience and resistance. As you explore the resources in the collection, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
17
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Viral Histories: Filipino American Nurses and Healthcare Workers

What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communitieswith community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, Viral Histories co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Abigaile De Mesa, a supervising nurse from New Jersey about the impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Abigaile De Mesa's interview by providing additional information about the US Philippine War, the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States, and how COVID-19 is impacting nurses today. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Abigaile's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make? 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Ashley M. Paxton
47
 

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska (https://learninglab.si.edu/org/sasc-ak)

Alaska Native heritage is woven from the beliefs, values, knowledge and arts of the Iñupiaq, Athabascan, St. Lawrence Island Yupik, Yup'ik, Unangax̂, Sugpiaq, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian peoples. Their diverse languages, cultures and histories are the foundation for contemporary lives. 

We invite teachers, students, parents and lifelong learners to explore Alaska Native cultures, museum objects, communities, videos and educational resources shared here. Learn about the peoples of this northern world from elders, culture-bearers, scholars and artists: https://learninglab.si.edu/org/sasc-ak.

About Us: In 1994, the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center (ASC) opened an office in Alaska at the Anchorage Museum, where staff members work with Alaska Natives on collaborative research and educational programs. In 2010, ASC opened the long-term exhibition Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska. It presents Indigenous voices, perspectives and knowledge through more than 600 masterworks of Alaska Native art and design from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and National Museum of the American Indian collections. Through their ongoing work, the ASC makes Smithsonian resources accessible to Alaska Natives and the general public.

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
1
 

History Lab: Time Capsules

In this History Lab, we will think about how many objects can work together to tell a story. How does a time capsule help us to learn about the past? What would you put in your own time capsule?

To talk with us and learn about more time capsules, join us for the History Lab Debrief! Visit https://www.heinzhistorycenter... and look for the History Lab section to find the registration link. We hope you can join us!

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
25
 

Subject: LGBTQ

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to LGBTQ interests.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, activism, march, gay rights, advocate, NOW, marriage equality, family, love, dress, identity, performance, legal rights, performance, entertainment, photojournalism, documentary photography, AIDS/HIV, memorial, vigil

Artists and authors who identify(ied) as bisexual, gay, or lesbian included in this Learning Lab collection:

  • Rosa Bonheur
  • F. Holland Day
  • Frida Kahlo


NMAH Photographic History Collection
34
 

Making a "Kitchen Memories" Family Recipe and Storybook

This collection includes an easy-to-do book project designed to get families talking, creating, and enjoying food together. It can be used as a home project, in the classroom (English, art, social studies), or in an informal learning setting, and can be combined with a family interviewing video project. 

The book is made from a single, large sheet of paper. Click on the demo and accompanying downloadable instructions to get started!

tags: art, crafts, crafting, how-to

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

Cultures

This playlist on different cultures in the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write a brief constructed response on why it is important to acknowledge and appreciate the different cultures that exist in the United States.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
63
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Melissa Sorrells
47
 

Hot Air Balloons

OBJECTIVES:

  • Explore the differences between the positions up and down
  • Imagine what it would look like to float high in the sky
  • Identify the parts of a hot air balloon—basket and envelope 
  • Experiment with hot air balloon design
  • Be inspired to create own fabric design
  • Discover that the flame heats the air causing the balloon to float up

Meredith Osborne
23
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Building Culturally Responsive Teaching Practice

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African American History and Culture as a method to help teachers develop their practice of culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
26
 

Great Changes

Participating in our government is a right built into the foundation of this country. The ideas of the citizens in this country have been spread and have made real changes not only in this country but around the world. Whatever face participation takes, whether it is voting, protesting, or just sending a letter to your congressman, it is vital for the system that is our government. This is a collection of some of the ways the citizens of this country have participated in our system to make their ideas heard and listen to.

Emma Mitchell
30
 

The I in America

These pictures explain how your participation is important in America's government and future

Jeramy Perez
30
25-48 of 2,016 Collections