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Found 382 Collections

 

Activity Collection: Botany Field Book

This teaching guide includes a lesson plan originally published as "Smithsonian in Your Classroom." It introduces students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of Smithsonian artists. Also included here is an additional optional resource: "Meet the Artist" to discover more about Smithsonian Botanical Illustrator Alice Tangerini.



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

#visiblethinking

Cody Coltharp
15
 

Activity Collection: Botany Field Book

This teaching guide includes a lesson plan originally published as "Smithsonian in Your Classroom." It introduces students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of Smithsonian artists. Also included here is an additional optional resource: "Meet the Artist" to discover more about Smithsonian Botanical Illustrator Alice Tangerini.



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

#visiblethinking

Teresa Maddox
15
 

Activity Collection: CUPCARS!

The Smithsonian and Lenovo want to inspire you to tinker! In this collection, you will learn how to create your very own CUPCAR! Follow steps two through five to create a balloon-powered cupcar, and steps six through eleven to create a motor-powered cupcar. 

Some steps have a yellow “paper clip” icon in the top left corner of the browser. Clicking this icon will reveal extra “Pro-Tips” for helping you build your cupcar.

Once your cupcar is moving, get creative! Try different placements of the parts for more efficiency. Decorate the outside with decals and markers. Race it with your friends!

Dawn Quill
20
 

Adding the A to STEM: Integrating Portraiture into STEAM/STEM Subjects

This Learning Lab demonstrates how portraiture can be used as an interdisciplinary springboard for lessons in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Portraits of STEM pertinent sitters provide a jumping-in point for students, visually grounding them in a subject. In this way, portraiture functions as an interdisciplinary tool to engage students and enrich their learning across curriculum. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
308
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
73
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  



Deborah Stokes
73
 

African rock art images - plants and leaves

This collection allows you to explore the various plant characteristics using African rock art images as data. The images include both rock art images and images of plant fossils. Use the accompanying exploration guide available on www.visibilityinstem.com to explore the plant images. For some of these images you will have to go directly to the site in order to see the images of plants at the bottom of the image. 

Catherine Quinlan
28
 

AIR & SPACE: A Visit to the Museum

Museums are great places for seeing and experiencing new things. Your young scientist will love taking a trip to visit an air and space museum, astronomy museum, or planetarium. 

Your child may be excited to see airplanes, rockets, astronaut gear, or learn about our solar system. There are lots of opportunities to talk and have fun together. This collection provides strategies and activities for adult caregivers visiting the museum with a child.

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
24
 

AIR & SPACE: Can it Fly?

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
14
 

AIR AND SPACE: Air Moves!

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Talk With Me Toolkit
14
 

Alcoholic Beverages in the 1700s

Throughout history alcohol is something that has been equally loved and hated, and there hasn't been a clear answer as to whether it is better or worse for society. This collection is showing the versatility of alcohol's uses prior to the mid-19th century. In this time period alcohol was consistently used as a medicine and I have included multiple variants of the medical purposes of these alcoholic beverages and mixtures. Also included in this collection is alcohol being used for medicinal purposes for the first president of the United States of America; George Washington. While the descriptions given for these pharmaceutical mixtures may not have been completely accurate they were obviously in some way effective or perceived to be so during this time period prior to major medical advancements that have been made today.

The secondary aspects of this collection features articles that include descriptions of different aspects of alcohol in society then and today. One of the examples is a chart from the 1790s that is condemning alcohol use and shows that even back in that time period many people understood that alcohol had many downsides and should be taken seriously, although depending on your perspective they were likely being a bit too strict about the use of it. Another article details a genetic feature known as the "Tipsy Gene" which is present in 10%-20% of the human population and drastically decreases the chances of alcoholism in the people that contain it. With such a small number of people that have a natural predisposition against alcoholism it is no surprise that is has been so prevalent in society up until today.


Brandon Salahuddin
10
 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 

Amelia Earhart: America's Aviatrix

Students will use the elements of portrayal to analyze portraits of Amelia Earhart and listen to a speech to learn biographic details.

#NPGteach

Christy Ting
10
 

American Bald Eagle

How did the bald eagle become the symbol of America? What symbolism did Native Americans find in the bald eagle?
This Collection of resources on the American bald eagle includes images, videos, sculptures, and stamps that depict the American bald eagle.
Linda Muller
17
 

Analyzing Emotions: An Exercise to Develop Emotional Intelligence

The collection includes a chart that briefly informs the viewer of the main areas of the brain and their functions. Also, it includes an image from the movie "Inside Out," to inspire the ways how a person could visualize emotion. The learning objective is for students to be able to have an understanding of what emotions and to become a more positive person. 

1. Go over the definition of emotion and look at the human brain chart to gain general information of the various parts of the brain.

2. On a piece of paper, write down the various emotions that you know and connect them with a personal daily action that you believe is relevant to that emotion (example: feeling happy when your pet greets you at the door). 

3. Using the response from the previous step, write a journal entry reflecting on how your daily negative actions could change and/or how you can continue the positive actions.

4. Use your responses to draw and cut out different  shapes from construction paper that represents your negative and positive emotions. 

4. After completing these steps, speak with a classmate some of the actions you are going to take to be a more positive person. 


Tags: brain; emotions; psychology; analysis

Samantha Castaneda
3
 

Animal Adaptations

Generative Topic: Animal Adaptations

Essential Questions:  

How do organisms live, grow, respond to their environment and reproduce?  

How and why do organisms interact with their environment and what are the effects of these interactions?  

How can there be so many similarities among organisms yet so many different kinds of plants, animals, and microorganisms?  

What are the roles of organisms in a food chain?   

How do the structures and functions of living things allow them to meet their needs?

What are characteristics that allow populations of animals to survive in an environment?

How does the variation among individuals affect their survival?

Understanding Moves: Describe What's There, Uncovering Complexity, Reason with Evidence

Thinking Moves: See Think Wonder, Parts Purposes Complexities

Lesson Focus:  

Students will investigate that animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction and will engage in engineering and design.  Students build a model and use their understanding of how animals are adapted to survive in a particular environment.

Prior Learnings/Connection:

Students have prior knowledge about ecosystems, animal classifications, basic adaptations such as means of obtaining diet, protection, and movement.

Understandings:

Organisms interact in feeding relationships in ecosystems.

Organisms may compete for resources in an ecosystem.

For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Other characteristics result from individuals’ interactions with the environment. Many characteristics involve both inheritance and environment.

Many characteristics of organisms are inherited from their parents.

When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Aquisition of Knowledge and Skill

Knowledge:

Producers (plants, algae, phytoplankton) make their own food, which is also used by animals (consumers).

Decomposers eat dead plant and animal materials and recycle the nutrients in the system.

Adaptations are structures and behaviors of an organism that help it survive and reproduce. 

Organisms are related in feeding relationships called food chains. Animals eat plants, and other animals eat those animals.

Skills:

Make observations to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon or test a design solution.

Use evidence (e.g. measurements, observations, patterns) to construct an explanation.

Identify the cause and effect relationships that are routinely identified and used to explain change.

Observe and identify structures and behaviors that help an animal survive in its environment.

Present results of their investigations in an organized manner.

Make a claim and supporting it with evidence.

Synthesize information from more than one source.

Assessment Evidence:

Performance Task: 

This collaborative project gives students the opportunity to take part in the systematic practice of engineering and design to achieve solutions to problems. During a life science unit, fourth grade students learn that for any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.  Students then apply these core scientific ideas to demonstrate understanding as they design, test, and refine an animal that is well suited to survive in its environment. By integrating content with practice, students are better able to make sense of science.

Presentation:

Students will create a  presentation in which they showcase their Animal design and explain how it is well adapted to survive in its environment.

Learning Activities:

During See Think Wonder students engage in observation of  animals as the foundation for greater insight into structure and function.  Students first look closely at an animal to fully observe and notice before interpreting.  Then students can begin to make interpretations based on their observations.  Students use Smithsonian Collection resources, such as videos, 3D models with pins/annotations, articles to further explore blue crab structures and behaviors and how they help the animal survive in its environment.   Students then use Parts Purposes Complexities routine to develop understanding of the concept of adaptation - a structure or behavior that improves an organism's chance of survival.  Students study the blue crab environment and as they consider how people changing the crabs' environment have affected the blue crab population.  To assess understanding, students complete the Animal Adaptations design challenge.

#PZPGH

Gary Galuska
15
 

Animal Adaptations: Beaks

A collection focused on a variety of bird beaks and their functions: including Sharp Beaks, Flat Beaks, Conical Beaks, Chisel Beaks, Probing Beaks, Filter Beaks, Curved Beaks and Fishing Beaks.#ISTE2016
Cally Flickinger
17
 

Animal Adaptations: Beaks

A collection focused on a variety of bird beaks and their functions: including Sharp Beaks, Flat Beaks, Conical Beaks, Chisel Beaks, Probing Beaks, Filter Beaks, Curved Beaks and Fishing Beaks.
Jon Berg
15
 

Animal Adaptations: Tails

A collection focused on a variety of animal tails and their functions.
Jon Berg
8
 

Animals in Nature

Look at each scene of animals in nature and think about what they could be doing. What do you see? What do you think is happening or is going to happen? What does it make you wonder?

Katie Grywczynski
4
 

Apollo

One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind, but in order to take those small steps, it took thousands of people from around the country to develop the tools and technology that got us to the Moon and back. In this episode of STEM in 30 learn about why we went to the Moon, what we accomplished, and what's next.

October 1, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Apollo 11 Crew

This topical collection details the human stories of the Apollo XI mission by giving details on the lives of each crew member; it includes pictures and an external link. There is a list of the resources in each section at the beginning of that section.
Goal: Students will understand the lives of the Apollo XI crew members and be able to assess how their lives as people influenced their accomplishments as astronauts.
Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Armstrong, Aldrin, Collins, space, space race, space travel, rocket

Inspired by the Harvard Project Zero thinking strategy unveiling stories
Jade Lintott
24
 

Apollo 13

Collection created to supplement the Red Clover Award book Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13.
Carrie Speranza
13
 

Apothecaries in Colonial Times

       This is a collection of apothecaries in Colonial America. Apothecaries in Colonial America had far more abilities other than selling drugs, medicine, and medical advice. Doctors in apothecaries performed surgeries, trained apprentices to become surgeons, midwifing, and concocted medications. Death rates were high during the beginning of Colonial America; however, as the years progress, people begin to discover new ways to help with illnesses. So, this collection of artifacts are meant to represent the medical history and advancements in Colonial times.

       Throughout this collection, you will see many various things such as: medical tools, the apothecaries themselves, medicine containers, medical techniques, and the medicine itself.

1st Picture: This glass bottle was used to store medicine in.

2nd Picture: Workers in apothecaries knew they had to store and preserve medicine and special medicinal liquids, so to prevent anything from getting stolen they kept it in a safe-keeping box.

3rd Picture: This was a special yet common medicinal herb called, Yarrow. It was used to help aid in the female menstrual cycle, wounds, and childbirth.

4th Picture: This picture is an example of a technique a doctor in an apothecary would use to diagnose illnesses.

5th Picture: This bottle was used to distill plant oils (i.e. such as yarrow) for their medicinal use.

6th Picture: This picture shows a common thing used by people that works in the apothecaries. Mortar and pestles were used to grinding up herbs.

7th Picture: This picture depicts how apprentices made medicine. Apprentices had to use recipe books to make all the medicines and herbal potions.

8th Picture: This jar represents a common practice in apothecaries. This leech jar contained leeches for doctors to use, because they believed if they drained the blood of an ill person, it could drain their illness with it.

9th Picture: This document shows how an apothecary could actually be established. This gave permission for the apothecary to make and sell medicines, and help people be cured against all types of human illnesses.

10th Picture: This is a picture of what the interior of what an apothecary looked like.

11th Picture: This is a special type of pottery used for apothecaries, because it has a glassy outer coating to prevent liquids from soaking through.



Esther Pak
11
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