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Found 890 Collections

 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 4

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the fourth in a series of five created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to May 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

In this session, held online while we are all home social distancing in the time of COVID-19, we will

* examine how immigrant origin youth may be experiencing the epidemic

* experiment with a set of revised socio-emotional thinking routines, and

* gather your input about the ways in which Re-imagining Migration together with the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the National Gallery of Art can support you as you prepare to engage students in digital learning.

#ReImaginingMigration

Re-imagining Migration
29
 

Museum Hopping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Smithsonian Museums. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can see the museums and explore the collections.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

IMMIGRATION

Rachel Lentini
20
 

Cultures

This playlist on different cultures in the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write a brief constructed response on why it is important to acknowledge and appreciate the different cultures that exist in the United States.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
63
 

Shaping America: Exploring Portraiture from the Colonial Era to the Civil War

Meet the politicians, reformers, inventors, authors, soldiers, and others who shaped the course of American history from the Colonial Era through the Civil War. Students will analyze portraits to learn about the diverse and significant contributions to American society made by individuals in the National Portrait Gallery’s collection.

#NPGteach

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to:

  •  Identify important Americans and analyze their contributions to U.S. History
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what we can learn about the sitter through these components

Keywords: Colonies, Revolutionary War, Westward Expansion, Civil War, Abolition, Suffrage

Nicole Vance
68
 

Subject: Civil War Photography: Seville CDV Collection

#nmahphc

This collection of cartes-de-visite portraits of Union soldiers is the Seville collection in the National Museum of American History’s Photographic History Collection. The collection was donated in 1931 by Smithsonian employee Marian Wells Seville, a Smithsonian library cataloger and assistant. Seville's father, Captain William P. Seville, served with the 1st Delaware Volunteers during the Civil War. Throughout the war, he obtained these photographs of the men with whom he served. Seville authored, The History of the First Regiment, Delaware Volunteers: From the Commencement of the “Three Month’s Service” to the Final Muster Out at the Close of the Rebellion, in 1884. 

The biographies of nearly all the subjects in this collection are attached to the record. Follow the links to "more info" after clicking on each image.

For more images, search collections.si.edu

Keywords: Civil War soldier, men in uniform, carte-de-visite, studio portraiture, mustache, military weapons, surgeon, surgeon-general., general, quartermaster, captain, heroics, Smithsonian history, women collectors, women donors, women librarians, use of photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
29
 

Abstracts to Accompany Poetry Lesson

Have students first answer the question, "Can you enjoy poetry without understanding it?" Usually, in my experience, the answer is no. Use the following pieces of abstract art and ask the same question. Can you deduct anything about the painting by what you see? What do you think about the painting? What is your emotional response? What do you wonder about the painting? By discussing these points, students will see that you can have an emotional reaction and enjoyment or non-enjoyment simply by looking at a piece for its parts. Replicate the same with the poem.

Jennifer Ingraham
8
 

Immigration

#smithstories

Yeferson Manchame
1
 

Making a "Kitchen Memories" Family Recipe and Storybook

This collection includes an easy-to-do book project designed to get families talking, creating, and enjoying food together. It can be used as a home project, in the classroom (English, art, social studies), or in an informal learning setting, and can be combined with a family interviewing video project. 

The book is made from a single, large sheet of paper. Click on the demo and accompanying downloadable instructions to get started!

tags: art, crafts, crafting, how-to

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Ashley M. Paxton
47
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Melissa Sorrells
47
 

Future Self Portrait Project

@NPGteach

Both a reflective and goal-setting project, the unit culminates in the creation of a future self-portrait. 

In line with college and career readiness, students reflect on goals and dreams for the future. They combine those with a vision--a portrait--of what they will be in 10 years. They will also create an understanding of specific steps that must be taken in order to turn the vision into reality. 

During the 2018-19 school year, stakeholders involved in Andover Public Schools (USD 385) gathered for a series of discussions about what they expect our students to know and who we want them to become by the time they leave our schools with diplomas. This developed into our Portrait of a Graduate, our district’s vision for our students. If your school doesn't have this kind of "portrait", you might add an additional step where students create their own Portrait of a Graduate. 

I use this project at the end of the year after we have practiced journal writing, reflection on academic endeavors, college and career readiness activities, etc. It allows them to dream of the future in a fun and creative way while gaining a broader understanding of how other express themselves, too. 

On the final thumbnail,  I have included the instructions I used for this unit during distance learning in the Spring of 2020. 

Deborah Eades
12
 

Uncovering America: Transportation

How does transportation affect our daily lives?

What can we learn about transportation and travel from works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Manifest Destiny and the West

In what ways was the US settled and unsettled in the 19th century?

What role did artists play in shaping public understandings of the US West?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Immigration and Displacement

Why do people migrate to and within the United States?

How might works of art help us understand personal experiences of immigration and displacement?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.


National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Gordon Parks Photography

How does Gordon Parks use photography to address inequities in the United States?

How do Gordon Parks’s images capture the intersections of art, race, class, and politics across the United States?

What do photographs in general—and Gordon Parks’s photographs more specifically—tell us about the American Dream?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Faces of America/Portraits

What is a portrait? What truths and questions does a portrait communicate?

What might a portrait express about the person portrayed? How does it reflect the sitter’s community, setting, family, or friends? What does the portrait reveal about the artist?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Activism and Protest

Why and how do people protest?

How might works of art show support or advocate for a cause?

How are people, communities, and events affected by works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Photographer: Tartt, Jo

#nmahphc

This is a collection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection of Polaroids by Jo Tartt, Jr. These photographs depict newspapers in newspaper boxes in Washington, DC during the time of the Iraq War.

For additional photographs, search collections.si.edu.

See also, Learning Lab Polaroid collection.

Keywords: newspaper, front page, photojournalism, newspaper box, above the fold, war photography, war time civil experience, protest, headlines, New York TimesWashington PostWashington ExaminerNew York PostDaily News, USA Today, US Army, military troops, Saddam Hussein, 

NMAH Photographic History Collection
50
 

Subject: Christmas

NMAH Photographic History Collection
67
 

Maps, Globes, and Geography

This playlist on geography is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students design a map of their community.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
54
 

MAKE IT: Funny Pages Poetry

Artist Tony Lewis loved Calvin and Hobbes when he was a boy. Inspired by a love of the “funny pages,” his artwork repurposes old comics into poems. Grab some comics and make your own!

 time: 30–45 minutes | skill level: Advanced | topic: comics and poetry


About HIRSHHORN KIDS at home

Want to be creative at home? Bring the joy of HIRSHHORN KIDS into your home with unique hands-on projects inspired by the artists in our collection. Projects are designed to keep kids of all ages engaged and interested in exploring art and making. New projects are released every week at HIRSHHORN KIDS at home and here on the Learning Lab.


HirshhornKidsAtHome
17
 

Fort Tejon

The Native Americans who lived in this area prior to the establishment of Fort Tejon are generally referred to as the Emigdiano. They were an inland group of the Chumash people. Unlike their coastal relatives, however, the Emigdiano avoided contact with European explorers and settlers, and were never brought into one of the missions or even incorporated into the Sebastian Indian Reservation. Once Fort Tejon was established, the Emigdiano often worked as independent contractors for the army, providing guides for bear hunts and delivering fresh fruits from their fields for sale in officers row. 

In 1852, President Millard Fillmore appointed Edward F. Beale to the position of Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California and Nevada, and sent him to California to head off further confrontation between the Indians and the many gold seekers and other settlers who were pouring into California. After studying the situation, Beale decided that the best approach was to set up a large Indian reservation at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley and to invite displaced Indian groups to settle there. 

In order to implement his plan, Beale requested a federal appropriation of $500,000 and military support for the 75,000 acre reservation he had selected at the foot of Tejon Pass. Colonel Ethan Allen Hitchcock, commander of the Pacific Division of the U.S. Army, supported Beale's plan and agreed to set up a military post on or near the Indian reservation. The army was eager, in any case, to abandon Fort Miller (near Fresno, California) in favor of a more strategically advantageous site in California's southern San Joaquin Valley. 

In August 1854, Major J.L. Donaldson, a quartermaster officer, chose the present site in Canada de las Uvas. The site was handsome and promised adequate wood and water. It was just 17 miles southwest of the Sebastian Indian Reservation, and it was right on what Major Donaldson was convinced would become the main route between the Central Valley and Southern California. 

For almost ten years, Fort Tejon was the center of activity in the region between Stockton and Los Angeles. The soldiers, known as Dragoons, garrisoned at Fort Tejon patrolled most of central and southern California and sometimes as far as Utah. Dragoons from Fort Tejon provided protection and policed the settlers, travelers and Indians in the region. People from all over the area looked to Fort Tejon for employment, safety, social activities and the latest news from back east. 

Lori Wear
64
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