Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(163)
(136)
(273)
(225)
(279)
(6)
(156)
(129)
(41)
(119)
(38)
(30)

Found 299 Collections

 

SSYAC Meeting 3 - Personal Narratives - Stories of Immigration - Why People Move (Archived: Fall 2017 - Spring 2018)

The third meeting of the SSYAC was held in collaboration with the Smithsonian Latino Center. During our pre-meeting activity, we proto-typed the “Latino Headliners and Difficult Conversations” program. We used the creation of comics to explore multiple perspectives of sensitive historical and contemporary issues that pertain to the US Latino experience. Staff from the Smithsonian Latino Center and Smithsonian Exhibits guided us as we explored the multiplicity of immigration realities, and focused on the personal stories that explain why people move

We also discussed the responses to the previous assignment about learning and education experiences in museums with staff from the Smithsonian's Associate Provost for Education and Access office.

KEYWORDS: immigration, migration, forced migration, Latino, maker, making, comic, teen council, student engagement

Tracie Spinale
120
 

SSYAC Meeting 2 - Museums, Activism, and Social Justice (Archived: Fall 2017 - Spring 2018)

When people ask you where you are from, what do you say? Why do you respond that way? Can you remember the first time you witnessed or experienced an injustice? Can we ask a nation to sacrifice development opportunities in the service of protecting the environment / treaty rights / tribal rights? What is your role in carrying on the maintenance of this relationship between tribes and the U.S.? How can museums respond to issues of social justice in the community? What should the Smithsonian do to share this story? How can we involve teens like you in sharing this story?

The second meeting of the SSYAC was held at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). During our pre-meeting activity, we explored the exhibition Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations. This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection contains the in-gallery activity which looks at the important relationship between the U.S. and tribal Nations by examining the 1851 Horse Creek Treaty and the present-day activism directly related to it at Standing Rock. The collection also contains background information resources about NMAI, as well as the Nation to Nation exhibit.

During our meeting dialogue, we discussed the outcomes of the "One Smithsonian" assignment.


Special thanks to NMAI colleagues Carolyn Rapkievian, Mandy Foster, and Ami Temarantz for creating and implementing the in-gallery activity in the Nation to Nation exhibition at NMAI.


KEYWORDS: student engagement, teen council, American history, DAPL, exhibition tour, inquiry-based learning, questions, Native American

Tracie Spinale
38
 

SSYAC Meeting 1: Knowledge Begins in Wonder (Archived: Fall 2017 - Spring 2018)

Knowledge Begins in Wonder... WHAT WOULD MAKE MUSEUMS BETTER?

  • interaction with objects - physical and virtual & accessible
  • make them applicable to teens

Teens played The Mystery of the Megatherium Club: Mustaches & Mayhem! scavenger hunt in the Castle, and had a dialogue with Smithsonian Secretary David J. Skorton and Dr. Robin Davisson.

KEYWORDS: Smithsonian history, mystery, LARP, live action role-play, teen, student engagement, teen council

Tracie Spinale
24
 

SENSES SERIES

Aggregate of Learning Lab collections about the Smithsonian collaboration with the Science for Monks and Nuns Program - senses and sensory perception.

Tracie Spinale
11
 

ORIENTATION | Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) Fall 2018 - Spring 2019


<<This information is relevant to the Fall 2018 - Spring 2019 SSYAC Program.>>

SUPER IMPORTANT: When you click into the tiles, be sure to notice in the upper left hand corner if there is a "paper clip" icon. Clicking on the paperclip icon will lead to more information on a side panel. Some of the tiles will be website links or video links. Tiles marked as PDF or DOC are downloadable information. Within a tile, arrows at the bottom of the screen will navigate you between tiles.


Orientation for new members of the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) for Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

  • About the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) -- including forms and other important information
  • About Secretary David J. Skorton
  • About Smithsonian's past and present
  • About Smithsonian Affiliate participants
  • About Smithsonian operations, and policy information helpful to SSYAC members. 
  • Meeting Resources (relevant info related to upcoming meetings will be added closer to meeting dates). 

KEYWORDS: teen council, student engagement

Tracie Spinale
32
 

Inlaid Imagery: A Different Way to Draw through Korean Ceramics

This collection briefly introduces the art of incision and inlay in ancient Korean ceramics as a unique method of creating imagery that can be both meaningful and beautiful. While these traditional ceramics known as celadon were not unique to Korea, as a functional art form they did reach new heights of craft and expression during the Goryeo Dynasty (935-1392) thanks to design innovations. One of the most notable modifications made by Korean potters was the practice of cutting away some clay (incising) and adding a different type (inlay), to create contrasts, patterns, shapes, images, and other visual and physical effects. 

As with other kinds of traditional Korean visual art, the images created on ceramics include familiar Korean folks motifs such as animals, plants, or elements of nature that carried specific aspirational meanings. This collection also provides examples of such folk images portrayed in ceramics, and explores some examples of such symbolism, as an inspiration for users to create their own images in a creative workshop. 

In terms of end goals, this collection will:

  1. Introduce Korean traditional incised ceramics 
  2. Help users learn to recognize the technique
  3. Introduce Korean folk images portrayed in such ceramics, and their symbolic nature
  4. Inspire users to create their own Korean folk-style image
Adam Wojciechowicz
16
 

Letters From Home: Chinese Exclusion and Family

The following digital exhibit highlights the personal experiences of Chinese immigrants in Seattle, WA during the early 20th century. The letter translations add the Wing Luke Museum's extensive archive of Chinese Exclusion era primary source letters into the canon of US history. This lesson is designed to capture the aesthetic, emotional and era-specific conventions in letter writing/correspondence,

The content includes historical references to further develop a student's understanding of Pull factors in immigration: the conditions driving populations to create new homes in new lands.

#APA2018 #TCSWingLuke


Rahul Gupta
19
 

The Red Scare

This collection features resources (photographs, portraits, documents, articles, and videos) about the Second Red Scare (1947-57), a period of anti-communist fear, also known as "McCarthyism," that spread through American life at the beginning of the Cold War.  Resources include key people, such as Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow, Alger Hiss, and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, letters documenting a university's requirement that faculty affirm they were not members of the Communist Party, individuals targeted by House Un-American Activities Committee, and more.

This collection provides a launching point for further research and should not be considered comprehensive.

Keywords: communism, anti-communism, anticommunism, HUAC, HCUA, hollywood blacklist, ray cohn 

Tess Porter
45
 

Latin American Artists

Latin American works from the Permanent Collection at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University. The works represent a timeline that spans thousands of years from pre colombian to present day.

#LatinoHAC

miriam machado
28
 

The Corona's Cooling Power

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its construction using renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. To minimize energy use, the architects and engineers designed the building to allow lots of natural light inside of the museum. The Corona, the ornamental bronze-colored metal lattice that covers the museum like a crown covers a head, helps to keep the museum cool by allowing some sunlight inside, but by blocking the rest. As a result, the museum uses less electricity for lights and air conditioning. 

But how does it work? Have your students complete the following experiment to find out!

NMAAHC Education
14
 

Christmas Past and Present for First Grade

How did families celebrate Christmas then and now?

1.H.1.2 Explain the importance of folklore and celebrations and their impact on local communities.


Christina Hawkins
6
 

"Shimomura Crossing the Delaware" by Roger Shimomura

This topical collection includes a painting, "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," by Roger Shimomura, an American artist of Japanese descent, with a National Portrait Gallery "Portrait Spotlight" containing background information and suggested questions for the classroom. Also included are a blog post and video interview of the artist about themes of identity in his work. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about Shimomura and his artworks and for further research.  Also included are Smithsonian Learning Lab collections with teaching strategies from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White

Keywords: Asian American, painter, Washington Crossing the Delaware, Claim, Support, Question, Compare and Contrast, Seattle 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Exploration of Different Gold Mining Tools and Techniques, at Columbia State Historic Park

Historical images of placer gold mining tools and techniques used, in Columbia, CA may be used for learning different placer gold mining techniques. These visual aids may provide a better understanding of how the types of mining tools changed over time, in Columbia, CA. As the California Gold Rush began miners traveled throughout the Sierra Nevada foothills, in search for gold. These miners traveled with very few items; some which included a gold pan, pick and shovel for easier travel. As more gold was discovered, mining parties established mining camps or tent towns; and, the cradle or rocker box was used to wash gold. Further development of mining camps brought in the use of long toms, sluice boxes and water diversions created for mining. The history of Columbia State Historic Park follows this storyline, but evolved into a full-scale mining town. Eighty-Seven Million dollars worth of gold, in the 1860s prices (Twelve to Sixteen dollars per ounce vs. current price of gold is over One Thousand dollars) was extracted from Columbia, CA. The amount of gold not only attracted miners, but business people, as well. In the mid 1850s, brick buildings with iron doors were built to provide more stable structures for the strong merchant economy. Today Columbia State Historic Park is home to the largest collection of gold rush era brick buildings, in California; whereas, structures of other mining camps of the California Gold Rush no longer exist.    

Columbia State Historic Park
7
 

The California Gold Rush: A Journey to the Goldfields

The famous discovery of gold in California, forever changed the landscape, economy and culture of California by the hundreds of thousands of people who migrated during California's gold rush. The famous discovery was made by James Marshall, at Sutter's Mill, on January 24th, 1848. Rumors and stories spread throughout the land of the discovery of gold, in California. The discovery was confirmed by President Polk,  11th President of the United States. President Polk made the announcement of the gold discovery, in California and the news spread world wide. Hundreds of thousands of people migrated to California from all around the world during the California Gold Rush of 1849. The journeys were long and dangerous. The three major routes are: around Cape Horn by ship (six to eight months), the Isthmus of Panama (two to three months), and the Overland trail (three to five months). By ship, dangers included: ship wrecks, lack of food and water, seasickness and disease. Ships that survived the long journeys arrived to the ports of San Francisco, where the migrants continued their journeys to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada.

Traveling 2,000 miles across an entire nation, on the Overland Trail by foot and wagons, exposed travelers other dangers, such as: misinformed trails, lack of food and water, and exposed them to inclimate weather while crossing deadly rivers, deserts, and high mountain passes. Only the very basic necessities were taken for these long journeys on the Overland trail; such as: food, water, wagons, stock, hunting tools, blacksmithing tools, clothing, blankets, sewing kits, medical supplies, etc.

On the Overland Trail, many miners joined companies. These companies were made up of people with various skills; such as, carpentry, medicine, navigation, hunting, blacksmithing and wheelwrights. The likelihood of surviving these long and dangerous journeys increased, significantly for those individuals who joined companies. If a company survived the journey to California on the Overland Trail, the company also had a higher likelihood of success in gold mining. Individuals within the company could stake multiple gold mining claims and the gold would then be divided among the people of the company. During the gold rush, individuals were only allowed to own one claim.  


Columbia State Historic Park
15
 

California Gold Rush History: Columbia California's Culture Expressed Through Historic Photos

The culture of Columbia expressed through a collection of historic photos.

Columbia State Historic Park
19
 

California Gold Rush Era Mining Technique Photos

Mining techniques evolved over time with development of larger mining companies. These photos also show cultural diversity during the California Gold Rush. 

Columbia State Historic Park
11
 

California Gold Rush Introduction

A collection complied to assist students and educators with visual aids for educational programs pertaining to the introduction of California Gold Rush History. James Marshall discovered gold in the year of 1848, along the American River, at Sutter's Mill (present day Coloma, California). President Polk, the 11th President of the United States made a landmark announcement to the world of Marshall's discovery. The news from President Polk started one of the largest mass migration of individuals to one place ever in recorded history. Between 1848 and 1852, California's population grew from 14,000 to 223,000. The gold rush was an opportunity for migrants to make a better life for themselves and families. By ship around Cape Horn, by foot through the Isthmus of Panama, or the overland trails by wagon, travels to the Territory of California were long and deadly. Those who survived the journeys fulfilled the dream of Westward migration. These migrations connected cultures from all over the world to develop the diverse population and abundance in opportunity that lives on, in California today.

Columbia State Historic Park
21
 

Historical Chinese Apothecary Exhibit of California Gold Rush Mining Town, at Columbia State Historic Park.

The population of California grew from 14,000 to 223,000 between the years of 1848 to 1852. During the California Gold Rush, people from different cultures migrated from all over the world, all sharing the same hopes of creating better lives for themselves and their families. The rich cultural diversity we find in California today can be traced back to many families from the earliest days of the State of California, through cultural artifacts. Columbia State Historic Park has the largest collection of gold rush brick buildings in California. This collection of 1850s gold rush era brick buildings is a living museum of cultural artifacts dated back to the diverse merchant economy that once thrived in Columbia, CA. During the gold rush, Columbia became one of the fifth largest cities in California, with one hundred and fifty businesses during the peak of Columbia's success. The Chinese population in Columbia owned a variety of different businesses; such as dry goods, boarding houses, laundry services, restaurants, and more. Originally, the Chinese population was located on the Western edge of town. In the late 1850s and 1860s, the Chinese began purchasing buildings from French merchants. The town's history of destructive fires and the rise and fall of the merchant economy shaped the reduction of the architectural landscape visitors find today, at Columbia State Historic Park. Many of the brick buildings survived it all and have been restored for visitors to enjoy today. Visitors of Columbia State Historic Park may view the Chinese Store exhibit through windows that display a large collection of Chinese artifacts. This collection of photos provides a closer look at the inside of the Chinese exhibit. Fong Yue Po, from the Yee Phong Herb Company, Sacramento, CA, donated many artifacts used in this exhibit.

Columbia State Historic Park
16
 

Industrial Revolution

  • Industrial Revolution, in modern history, the process of change from an agrarian and handicraft economy to one dominated by industry and machine manufacturing. This process began in Britain in the 18th century and from there spread to other parts of the world. Although used earlier by French writers, the term Industrial Revolution was first popularized by the English economic historian Arnold Toynbee (1852–83) to describe Britain’s economic development from 1760 to 1840. Since Toynbee’s time the term has been more broadly applied.
Alejandra Diaz
2
 

Triumph and Tragedy: World War I

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2019, "Triumph and Tragedy in History."

These resources - including photographs, letters, artwork, lesson plans, and articles - explore the costs and consequences of America’s involvement in World War I and its complex legacies in the decades following. Resources highlight Woodrow Wilson and his foreign policy, the roles of African American soldiers during and after the war, artwork by soldiers and government-sponsored artists depicting the psychological effects of the battlefield, letters written by soldiers to those back home, the physical costs of war and the triumphs of medical innovation, and the sinking of the RMS Lusitania, which resulted in the deaths of 1,198 civilians. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: the great war, wwi, ww1, world war one, world war 1, military, perspective, 20th century, 1900s, american expeditionary forces, aef, woodrow wilson, buffalo soldiers, 92nd infantry division, 93rd infantry division, african-american, black, harlem hellfighters, art, horace pippin, claggett wilson, harvey thomas dunn, william james aylward, anna coleman ladd, prosthetic, rms lusitania, postcard, form letter, #NHD

Tess Porter
84
 

National History Day: Art and World War I

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including artworks, handwritten memoirs, lesson plans, and articles  - help explore World War I (1914-1918) through artwork created by soldiers and other individuals involved in the Great War.  Collection highlights artists Horace Pippin (a member of the Harlem Hellfighters), Claggett Wilson, William James Aylward, and Harvey Thomas Dunn.  Other important artists and artworks, as well as additional information on World War I, is located at the end. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: wwi; ww1; world war 1; soldier; military; perspective; witness;  african american; artist; artwork; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

Tess Porter
78
 

Landscapes

Choose several images to compare/contrast in terms of location, season, and/or style. Discuss why artists may choose to depict a particular place.

Formal analysis for elementary students: identify foreground, middle ground and background; describe how size and placement of objects and use of overlapping contribute to the illusion of depth.

Formal analysis for secondary students: describe color harmonies; identify focal point; find examples of one-point, two point, and atmospheric perspective.

Jean-Marie Galing
35
 

Art and Science Intersections at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction for educators to the intersections of art and science.  Each image links to resources,  which include Freer|Sackler works of art, exhibition information, 3-D tours, videos, online interactives, and articles.  Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it for your students.

Keywords: Buddha, Buddhism, lacquer, stone, bronze, carving, conservation, technology, China, bells, music, sound, Resound, 3-D, STEM, STEAM, Metropolitan Museum, Walters Art Museum, Smithsonian, arts, science 

Freer|Sackler Education
17
 

An Introduction to Japanese Painting

This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. 

Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, emakibyobukakemono, ukiyo-e, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, surimono



Freer|Sackler Education
12
25-48 of 299 Collections