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Found 313 Collections

 

"Legendary Women's Voices" - Cynthia Erivo & NSO at the Kennedy Center, April 2019

On April 5-6, 2019, the Kennedy Center will host an evening of "Legendary Women's Voices," as performed by Cynthia Erivo and the National Symphony Orchestra. Featuring repertoire by artists ranging from Marian Anderson and Nina Simone to Gladys Knight and Beyoncé, the performances aim to honor a diversity of iconic women musicians. The event is being co-promoted by the Smithsonian Year of Music. Through the Learning Lab, the Smithsonian highlights a collection of artifacts that relate to the musicians featured in the Kennedy Center concerts.

Meredith Holmgren
36
 

Landscapes

Choose several images to compare/contrast in terms of location, season, and/or style. Discuss why artists may choose to depict a particular place.

Formal analysis for elementary students: identify foreground, middle ground and background; describe how size and placement of objects and use of overlapping contribute to the illusion of depth.

Formal analysis for secondary students: describe color harmonies; identify focal point; find examples of one-point, two point, and atmospheric perspective.

Jean-Marie Galing
29
 

Animal Sculptures

Images support second grade paper sculpture lesson. View a few images and lead a discussion with questioning:

  • What do you notice about this picture?
  • Where do you think this is located?
  • If you were here and saw this animal, what would you be thinking?
  • Why do you think the artist chose to put this animal in this spot?
  • How do you think the animal affects people who use this space?
  • Can you think of a space in your community where an artist might place an animal sculpture?
Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Celebrate Good Times

Images support second grade collage lesson. Choose an image that connects to a poem read to students (from Celebrate American in Poetry in Art, edited by Nora Panzer). Use questioning to describe and analyze the artwork:

  • "What do you see?"
  • "What is happening here?
  • "What clues make you think that?"
  • "What else is happening in this image?"

Ask students to take a minute to think of a personal experience that this image reminds them of, then turn to a partner and share. This prepares them for the next step, which is to visualize a favorite community celebration and sketch in preparation for making a collage.

Jean-Marie Galing
5
 

Mary Vaux Walcott, Artist

"Sometimes I feel that I can hardly wait till the time comes to escape from city life, to the free air of the everlasting hills." -Mary Vaux Walcott, Letters to Charles Walcott, Feb 19, 1912.

This collection contains personal selections from the nearly 800 botanical illustrations by Mary Walcott held at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. 

From Wikipedia (March 5, 2019): Mary Morris Vaux[a] was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to a wealthy Quaker family. After graduating from the Friends Select School in Philadelphia in 1879, she took an interest in watercolor painting. When she was not working on the family farm, she began painting illustrations of wildflowers that she saw on family trips to the Rocky Mountains of Canada.[3] During the family summer trips, she and her brothers studied mineralogy and recorded the flow of glaciers in drawings and photographs.[4] The trips to the Canadian Rockies sparked her interest in geology.[3]

In 1880, at the age of nineteen, Vaux took on the responsibility of caring for her father and two younger brothers when her mother died.[5] After 1887, she and her brothers went back to western Canada almost every summer. During this time she became an active mountain climber, outdoors woman, and photographer. Asked one summer to paint a rare blooming arnica by a botanist, she was encouraged to concentrate on botanical illustration.[4] She spent many years exploring the rugged terrain of the Canadian Rockies to find important flowering species to paint. On these trips, Vaux became the first women to accomplish the over 10,000 feet ascent of Mount Stephen.[6] In 1887, on her first transcontinental trip via rail, she wrote an engaging travel journal of the family's four-month trek through the American West and the Canadian Rockies.[7]

Over her father's fierce objections, Mary Vaux married the paleontologist Charles Doolittle Walcott, who was the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, in 1914, when she was 54. She played an active part in her husband's projects, returning to the Rockies with him several times and continuing to paint wildflowers. In 1925, the Smithsonian published some 400 of her illustrations, accompanied by brief descriptions, in a five-volume work entitled North American Wild Flowers. In Washington, Mary became a close friend of First Lady Lou Henry Hoover[5] and raised money to erect the Florida Avenue Meeting House, so that the first Quaker President and his wife would have a proper place to worship. From 1927 to 1932, Mary Vaux Walcott served on the federal Board of Indian Commissioners and, driven by her chauffeur, traveled extensively throughout the American West, diligently visiting reservations.

When she was 75, she made her first trip abroad to Japan to visit lifelong friend and fellow Philadelphia Quaker, Mary Elkington Nitobe, who had married Japanese diplomat Inazo Nitobe.

She was elected president of the Society of Woman Geographers in 1933. In 1935, the Smithsonian published Illustrations of North American Pitcher-Plants, which included 15 paintings by Walcott. Following the death of her husband in 1927, Walcott established the Charles Doolittle Walcott Medal in his honor. It is awarded for scientific work on pre-Cambrian and Cambrian life and history. Walcott died in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.[3]

#fivewomenartists #5womenartists #BecauseOfHerStory

Darren Milligan
42
 

Practice Telling Time

This collection includes a variety of images of clock faces to use with young learners who are practicing skills in telling time with analog clocks featuring Arabic numerals. Teachers can use these images to help students tell and write time to the nearest minute.  The images range from clocks in isolation to clocks used in artworks and finally, clocks in context through photography. Additional resources are included to provide further teaching context on the concept of time.

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Artists, Actresses and Performers: Women Who Shaped History

This topical collection includes resources related to featured women artists, actresses and performers. This collection includes portraits of the artists, actresses and performers, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the women's life stories, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.  

Keywords: Hattie McDaniel, Aretha Franklin, Frida Kahlo, Anna May Wong, Selena Quintanilla, Maria Tallchief, Maya Lin, Gladys Bentley, #BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
81
 

ORIENTATION | Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

<<This information is relevant to the Fall 2018 - Spring 2019 SSYAC Program.>>

SUPER IMPORTANT: When you click into the tiles, be sure to notice in the upper left hand corner if there is a "paper clip" icon. Clicking on the paperclip icon will lead to more information on a side panel. Some of the tiles will be website links or video links. Tiles marked as PDF or DOC are downloadable information. Within a tile, arrows at the bottom of the screen will navigate you between tiles.


Orientation for new members of the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) for Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

  • About the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) -- including forms and other important information
  • About Secretary David J. Skorton
  • About Smithsonian's past and present
  • About Smithsonian Affiliate participants
  • About Smithsonian operations, and policy information helpful to SSYAC members. 
  • Meeting Resources (relevant info related to upcoming meetings will be added closer to meeting dates). 

KEYWORDS: teen council, student engagement

Tracie Spinale
32
 

The Red Scare

This collection features resources (photographs, portraits, documents, articles, and videos) about the Second Red Scare (1947-57), a period of anti-communist fear, also known as "McCarthyism," that spread through American life at the beginning of the Cold War.  Resources include key people, such as Joseph McCarthy, Edward R. Murrow, Alger Hiss, and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, letters documenting a university's requirement that faculty affirm they were not members of the Communist Party, individuals targeted by House Un-American Activities Committee, and more.

This collection provides a launching point for further research and should not be considered comprehensive.

Keywords: communism, anti-communism, anticommunism, HUAC, HCUA, hollywood blacklist, ray cohn 

Tess Porter
45
 

Sustainable Textiles

Sustainability is about using techniques that allow for continual reuse of resources. Why might textile designers want to reuse scraps or reclaim waste fibers? What other things that get thrown away could be reused as part of a woven textile? 

ART MAKING CHALLENGE: Incorporate something recyclable in a hand-woven textile.  Consider color, texture, and how well it will perform for a particular purpose.  Would you combine the recycled items with traditional yarns or just use re recycled items? Which method is likely to get the results you want?

Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

National History Day: "Flygirls"

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - photographs, objects, videos, articles, and more - focus on the lives and contributions of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs), or "Flygirls" of WWII. Highlighted in this collection are also two African-American aviators, Willa Brown and Janet Bragg; discriminatory practices disallowed African-Americans from joining the WASPs during WWII. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: Women's Rights. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tile for a summary of collection resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: woman; women; female; feminism; feminist; pilot; aviator; army; world war 2; ww2; world war II; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
29
 

National History Day: Suffrage Movement, 1848-1919

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

This collection focuses on milestones and important figures in the American Suffrage Movement, beginning at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and leading up to the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1919. Resources include lesson plans, photographs, videos, objects, articles, and more. This collection is part of the larger collection, Taking a Stand: Women's Rights. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tiles for summaries of section resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: women's rights; woman; female; feminism; feminist; suffrage; suffragette; protest; reform; civil rights; equal rights; susan b anthony; elizabeth cady stanton; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
51
 

National History Day: Women's Rights

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2017 theme, "Taking a Stand in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.

These resources - portraits, objects, blog posts, websites, articles, and more - pinpoint milestones in the Women's Rights Movement in the United States. Because of the depth of resources on this topic, this collection has been split into sections: Suffrage Movement, 1848-1919; World War II "Flygirls"; Eleanor Roosevelt; and other leaders in the fight for Women's Rights. Each section is introduced with a standalone text tile that summarizes the resources held within the section. The first two section summaries are followed by a link out to a sub-collection of resources, containing additional Smithsonian resources on these topics.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: suffragists; suffragette; pilot; female; woman; feminist; feminism; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
51
 

Can you name #5WomenArtists?

This collection is my response to the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.'s social media campaign asking, "Can you name five women artists (#5WomenArtists)?" The artists featured are Yayoi Kusama, Frida Kahlo, Barbara Kruger, Alma Thomas and Elaine de Kooning with short biographical notes, selected works and learning resources.

Anyone can create a collection on the Smithsonian Learning Lab. Here are some short tutorials to get you started: https://learninglab.si.edu/create. The Smithsonian Learning Lab can be a great research tool to learn more about your favorite artists, discover new artists and share collections of your favorites and new discoveries to provide inspiration for others. Discussion questions and additional sources of inspiration for exploring artists that may be new to you are provided at the end of this collection.

Tags: Women's History Month, Yayoi Kusama, Frida Kahlo, Barbara Kruger, Alma Thomas, Elaine de Kooning, #BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Dolores Huerta: Images, Videos, and "One Life" Exhibition

This topical collection explores the contributions to American history and society of Civil Rights activist Dolores Huerta, the "co-architect" with Cesar Chavez of the American Farm Workers Movement. The images and resources can be used as discussion or writing prompts in a variety of courses, including history, culture, language, and literature. Included in this collection are images from the exhibition, "One Life: Dolores Huerta," a bilingual video with National Portrait Gallery curator Taína Caragol, footage of an interview program with Dolores Huerta at the museum, and an NPR interview with Dolores Huerta in January 2017.

#LatinoHAC #BecauseOfHerStory

Philippa Rappoport
19
 

SSYAC 2018/2019 Meeting 1 - National Air and Space Museum

The first meeting of the third cohort of the SSYAC (2018-2019) will be held at the National Air and Space Museum on October 24, 2018. The meeting will be out of this world.  We'll begin by playing a "break-out box" game in the Moving Beyond Earth gallery. Can you help Dr. Skorton solve the space history clues to UNLOCK the mysteries of the universe? OR will we be lost in space? Next, we'll meet Dr. Ellen Stofan, Director (and Scientist), National Air and Space Museum (NASM). We'll hear about plans to renovate the museum--and what it takes to be the world's most visited museum. Next, since it's our very first meeting of the new SSYAC year, we'll take a moment to greet friends--both old and new. Secretary Skorton will discuss this year's SSYAC agenda, and answer some of the questions that you posed to him in your applications. Finally, we'll take a group photo. If you have any questions--do not hesitate to reach out to Tracie Spinale, tspinale(AT)si.edu or your Affiliate Coordinator. 

Tracie Spinale
18
 

SSYAC 2018/2019 Meeting 2 - Smithsonian American Art Museum

The second meeting of the third cohort of the SSYAC (2018-2019) will be held at the Smithsonian American Art Museum on November 19, 2018. 

We'll meet Stephanie Stebich, Director, SAAM and Renwick Gallery.  We'll hear about the history and function of the museum, and think about the role of science in the preservation of art. We'll visit behind-the-scenes at the Lunder Center for Conservation, where Amber Kerr, Chief of Conservation, will share her innovative research using infrared reflectography and ultraviolet-induced luminescence on the paintings of DC-artist Alma Thomas. Ms. Kerr will also talk to the group about the conservation of plastics which make-up the Renwick's Game Fish sculpture.

Our dialogue with the Secretary will focus on: 

 In today’s world, what are your concerns—both national and at a local community level? How can a cultural institution like the Smithsonian help to address those issues? 

Tracie Spinale
13
 

SSYAC 2018/2019 Meeting 3 - Smithsonian Institution Libraries - Cullman Natural History (Rare Books)

Leslie Overstreet, Rare Books Curator provides an overview of the Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library of Natural History—its significance and purpose. We'll view up to ten rare books, and Leslie will provide an overview of their significance, focusing on how art books in this library support scientific research—not just for the natural history museum scientists, but for the entire field of natural history. A discussion with the Secretary follows:

  • What role do libraries have today—how has it changed? (SIL mission to save and share our stories for future generations) 
  • Are public libraries still relevant to teens? What about high school libraries?
  • How are libraries adapting themselves to be relevant to youth and teens in a digital world?
    Sara Cardello will share examples of youth engagement through the Unstacked Museum in a Box interactive, and Chaptour Guides Program. 
Tracie Spinale
46
 

PT 1 Triumph and Tragedy: American Industry

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2019, "Triumph and Tragedy in History."

These resources - including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles - explore triumphs and tragedies in American industrialization from the late 18th century through the early 20th century.  Resources highlight influential industrialists called "captains of industry" by some and "robber barons" by others, catastrophes that occurred as a result of rapid industrialization, labor leaders who fought successfully for the rights of laborers dismal conditions, the origins of child labor laws, leading inventors and their inventions, and other important topics. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: strike, protest, union, andrew carnegie, john d. rockefeller, j.p. morgan, cornelius vanderbilt, henry clay frick, helen frick, andrew w. mellon, newsies, newsboys, child labor reform, thomas alva edison, incandescent lamp, nikola tesla, electric motor, electric power, alexander graham bell, telephone, christopher latham sholes, c. lathan sholes, carlos glidden, samuel soule, typewriter, triangle shirtwaist factory fire, pinkerton national detective agency, matewan massacre, wall street bombing of 1920, boston molassses disaster, asa philip randolph, a. philip randolph, john llewellyn lewis, john l. lewis, frances perkins, samuel gompers i.l.g.w.u, international ladies garment workers union, david dubinsky, company towns, #NHD

Heather Sorrell
25
 

Origins: U.S. Constitution

#SJ2019LP

Matthew Montes
30
 

Pigs!

Some of my favorite pigs, hogs, and boars from across the Smithsonian collection.

Darren Milligan
54
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer|Sackler Education
111
 

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Martin Luther King, Jr. found inspiration in Henry David Thoreau. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Grace Davis
49
 

Doorways & Passages

Doorways are the transition point from one place to another.  They can be functional, decorative, symbolic, or a combination of all three.  Work with a partner to view and discuss a selection of doorways.

  • What does it look like?
  • What is it made of?
  • Where do you think it leads?
  • How does it impact the viewer or person who might want to enter/exit?

ART MAKING CHALLENGES: 

  • Design a doorway or passageway that symbolizes what happens inside.
  • Design a doorway or passageway that links a physical place to an imaginary one.
  • Design a doorway to represent a transition from one period of your life to another. 

Jean-Marie Galing
31
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