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Found 5,233 Collections

 

Ancient Egypt

Nicole Hancock
16
 

Ancient Civilizations: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
11
 

Ancient Civilizations- Ancestral Puebloans

This collections is comprised of sources discussing: how do we remember ancient civilizations? What are they remembered for? This collection is focused on Ancestral Puebloans. What do these objects tell us? #TeachingInquiry 

Caitlin Plunkett
14
 

Ancient Civilizations - Egypt

Artworks about Egypt in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection.

Peg Koetsch
40
 

Ancient China

A collection of resources about Ancient China.
Linda Muller
32
 

Ancient China

Images of and related to Ancient China 

Marin Layne Williams
31
 

Ancient Africa and Ancient China

Grade 6 library and social studies collaboration
Erin Kizziar
7
 

Anatomy and Osteology: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
12
 

Anasazi

Look through these artifacts and choose which ones you think are most important and you'd like to use in your museum. 

Laura Koroski
10
 

Analyzing Photography in the U.S. History Classroom

Resources supporting the March 2017 Google Hangout facilitated by the National Museum of American History's curator of Photographic History, Shannon Perich, in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access. Suggested questions for analyzing photographs, yearbooks, photo albums and portraits are included. The archived version of the online session is available at the end of the collection for viewing.

Tags: Migrant Mother, Napalm Girl, Tank Man, Times Square Kiss, 1943 Rohwer Center High School Yearbook, WWI Photo album, Robert Wiengarten, Hank Aaron

Shannon Perich
23
 

Analyzing Photographs Over Time, with the Scurlock Studio's Portraits of Washington, DC

For most of the 20th century, the photographers of the Scurlock Studio documented Washington, D.C.'s aspiring African American community and its thriving city life. Now archived at the Smithsonian, the thousands of Scurlock images reveal both the everyday and major moments in African American life for nearly a century, from social events, graduations, weddings, and baptisms to visits by dignitaries.

This Learning Lab collection includes several videos, magazine articles, and websites to introduce students to the Scurlock photographs. The collection also includes highlights of the archives and a graphic organizer with questions for students to think about as they analyze the images.
Ashley Naranjo
33
 

Analyzing Oral History Interviews: Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio

This collection includes a series of oral history interviews the Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio from 2013. Ten Asian Indians who settled in the Greater Cleveland region during the 1950s and 1960s were interviewed by middle and high school students. These interviews document their unique immigrant experiences and focus on professional, family and religious life.

Complementary resources to the podcast files include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, and a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history.

Interviewees include: Ajeet Singh Sood, Batuk Modi, Dipti P. Roy, Elizabeth and Winfred Balraj,  Gulab Khandelwal,  Ivan Tewarson, Kul Bhushan, Om Julka, Paramjit Singh, P.K. and Virginia Saha,  Ramachandran Balasubramaniam, Ranajit Datta, Sam Rajiah, Shanta and Surinder Kampani, Shiv and Saroj Aggarwal, Vijay Rastogi, Vinay and Surinder Bhardwaj

#APA2018

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
10
 

Analyzing Emotions: An Exercise to Develop Emotional Intelligence

The collection includes a chart that briefly informs the viewer of the main areas of the brain and their functions. Also, it includes an image from the movie "Inside Out," to inspire the ways how a person could visualize emotion. The learning objective is for students to be able to have an understanding of what emotions and to become a more positive person. 

1. Go over the definition of emotion and look at the human brain chart to gain general information of the various parts of the brain.

2. On a piece of paper, write down the various emotions that you know and connect them with a personal daily action that you believe is relevant to that emotion (example: feeling happy when your pet greets you at the door). 

3. Using the response from the previous step, write a journal entry reflecting on how your daily negative actions could change and/or how you can continue the positive actions.

4. Use your responses to draw and cut out different  shapes from construction paper that represents your negative and positive emotions. 

4. After completing these steps, speak with a classmate some of the actions you are going to take to be a more positive person. 


Tags: brain; emotions; psychology; analysis

Samantha Castaneda
3
 

Analyzing Cultural Identity

The following lesson is intended for high school students in an ICT English Language Arts classroom.

By the end of the lesson, students (ages 14-18), will be able to determine a central idea about identity by analyzing multiple texts. Students will apply their understanding of artwork (George Catlin's "Wi-jún-jon, Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going To and Returning From Washington") to one or more poems that share conflicting themes of identity. Students are assessed on their ability to create claims, support claims with evidence, synthesize information from multiple sources, and develop a central idea about identity.


#SAAMteach
Nick Verrillo
5
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Grant Ichikawa

This collection includes an oral history interview with Grant Hayao Ichikawa (April 17, 1919- December 3, 2017). Ichikawa was a U. S. Army veteran who enlisted after he was relocated to a Japanese American incarceration camp with his family in 1942. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Japanese Americans.

Complementary resources to the podcast audio file include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history, and additional video and audio oral histories with Grant Ichikawa from the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Congressional Gold Medal, veteran, internment camps, World War II, commission, wartime, close listening

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Analysis of Resources in a Learning Lab Collection - Teacher Workshop on August 10, 2016

This collection contains two resources - a broadside and a screen print.
Think about how you would use them to deepen your students' comprehension of a particular historical era and how you would use them within your instructional cycle.
Linda Muller
4
 

Analysis of an Artwork by Maya Lin

Chinese American designer and artist Maya Lin (b. 1959) achieved national recognition as a Yale University undergraduate student when her design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial won a national competition. 

In this activity, students will analyze a unique artwork-filled room designed by Maya Lin, first using only a still visual with little context, then a hyperlapse video of the artwork's installation,  then the artist herself discussing  her process, materials used, and vision. Students will make predictions based on visuals, gradually learn about the context of the artwork, and reflect on how their perception of the artwork changed with the addition of new information. 

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Maya Lin's artwork and other artworks inspired by experiences with the natural environment. This activity opens with a Project Zero See-Think-Wonder routine and asks learners to look closely, prior to revealing additional contextual information. To learn more about other Asian Pacific American Artists, visit this collection: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/asian-pacific-american-artists/bW68eE1p6kHVzsC7#r

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, Maya Lin, Asian American, marbles, Renwick Gallery, waterways

#APA2018 #BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Anahita Emami 1920s, 1930s Artifacts

This collection of artifacts showcases some of the most important events that occurred during the 1920s and 1930s in America.

Anahita Emami
10
 

An Introduction to Origami Paper Folding

In this activity, students will be introduced to the art of origami paper folding by learning how this tradition has been passed down through generations from an interview with an artisan and how to make an origami paper crane from a fellow student.
Ashley Naranjo
4
 

An Introduction to Japanese Painting

This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. 

Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, emakibyobukakemono, ukiyo-e, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, surimono



Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

An Introduction to Hawai'ian Lei Making

All Polynesians have a history of making and giving of lei. From early times, Hawaiians have fashioned lei from shells, seeds, bone, and feathers and from more temporary materials such as leaves, vines, and a few indigenous flowers. Colorful flowers and greenery are braided, twisted, wrapped, or strung together to create lei for the neck, head, wrists and ankles. Lei are made and given for marriages, birthdays, luaus, and funerals. Leis are also given on informal occasions to express gratitude or warmth of friendship. In this collection, you’ll learn how to make your own lei and explore other examples of leis made from a variety of natural materials.
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

An Evolution of Expression

The eclectic and time-honored art form of quilting has been used as a material expression of ideologies, social stances, and culture. Though the basic process of quilting involves the sewing of two or more layers of fabric, quilters have increasingly integrated materials, symbols, words, and individual styles with communicative, celebratory, and decorative intentions.

This collection displays digitized images of quilts that reflect the diversity of the quilting tradition in America. Some quilts have been displayed at the National Museum of African American History and Culture and others at the National Museum of the American Indian. The Smithsonian’s National Quilt Collection is housed at the National Museum of American History. 

This collection includes an article that explores the evolution and artistry of quilting and a list of discussion questions that can be used to analyze the collection.

Keywords: African American, NMAAHC, American History, Quilts

Le'Passion Darby
9
 

An 11 year old's Letter and Lincoln's Beard

This teaching collection includes videos, portraits and lesson plans from the National Portrait Gallery and the National Museum of American History. During Abraham Lincoln's campaign to become president, an 11-year-old girl named Grace Bedell wrote a letter suggesting he grow a beard to gain more votes. Of course, Lincoln's beard became iconic in imagery during his Presidency and throughout the Civil War.

Ashley Naranjo
11
4729-4752 of 5,233 Collections