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Found 5,996 Collections

 

Ocean life pollution effects

collection of images based on sea life, art and effects of water pollution to use as reference in a lesson or unit on the effect of ocean and water pollution. This could lead into a lesson based on creation of recycled materials as well as a science integrated lesson about how to clean up local water sources and make an positive impact on the environment.

kristen fessler
12
 

Urbanized America: The American Experience in the Classroom

The early years of the twentieth-century saw a significant increase in economic inequality between the wealthiest Americans and the poorest. While the rich continued to bathe in their unregulated, post-industrial age economic success, the poor, largely represented by the overwhelming influx of new immigrants, remained trapped in an unrelenting cycle of poverty and adversity. Many struggled to find prosperity and acceptance in a country where some American citizens harbored foreign resentment and racism. Emblematic of the hardships they encountered is artist Everett Shinn’s chaotic scene of Lower East Side Jewish immigrants being evicted from their homes. This scene in downtown New York City is starkly contrasted with artist Childe Hassam’s romanticized view of an ethereal woman in her uptown home surrounded by beautiful objects likely acquired through European travel. She represents the prosperous post-industrial age, where wealthy patrons demonstrated their cultural sophistication through the acquisition and display of exotic, priceless objects in their homes.

The expanding urban population precipitated the introduction of new building materials in the development of high-rise buildings and tenements, revolutionizing urban living. Technological innovations like the electrified elevator and the Bessemer steel process replaced older building techniques and enabled the construction of high-rise buildings, the new symbols of American progress. However, overcrowding of the evolving urban landscape also gave rise to problems such as poverty, disease, and lawlessness. These issues ultimately led to crucial social reform and legislation, known collectively as Progressivism.

http://americanexperience.si.edu/historical-eras/modern-united-states/pair-eviction-tanagra/
Phoebe Hillemann
21
 

When did women achived equal rigths in North America? #TeachingInquiry

This collection pretends to show how women fought for equal rigths and the importance in history

Mariana Silveira
8
 

Brendan and Eponine

period

Eponine Bennett
15
 

APUSH WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Molly Chester
14
 

Lily Buckshaw and Jake Jashinski

Period 4

Lily Buckshaw
15
 

Be The Curator with SAAM and NPG Collections

Resources from the P21 Exemplar Teacher Workshop held at SAAM and NPG February 28, 2017.

Phoebe Hillemann
10
 

Exploring Our Planet through Satellite Images

Resources supporting the March 2016 Google Hangout facilitated by the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, including a resource list compiled by Dr. Steven H. Williams, Chief of STEM Engagement at NASM.
Ashley Naranjo
45
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Lisa Major
32
 

Myth and Art

Keila Guzman
21
 

Weikers Family Collection Class Warm-Up

This is a single document with hot spots and questions used to model primary source analysis for a sixth grade class. It is drawn from a collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States. You can find the full collection here:

https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/weikers-family-collection/zGJCDjyWqouEufnb

Questions to consider are:

a. Who are the Weikers?

b. Where did they live?

c. When did they live? What can they tell us about this time in history?

d. How were they affected by Nazi Germany?

e. What did they feel about the Nazis?

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources, Pittsburgh

Kate Harris
2
 

Kylie Syska and Marissa Harper

Period 4
Kylie Syska
15
 

Cotton Boll Lesson

A set of resources to implement the cotton boll activity presented in the Smithsonian's Let's Do History Tour.

Matthew
18
 

Matt Potock and Davis Deasy

Period 4

Matt Potock
16
 

Jim McGrath, Marc Kwiatkowski

Period 4

Jim McGrath
15
 

Taylor, Leah, Lexie

Period 3

TAYLOR WOLF
26
 

Natalie Albinger and Claire Schreiber

Period 3

natalie albinger
15
 

Manifest Destiny

#SAAMteach
Lisa Major
5
 

Letter from Custer's Ghost

Imagine you are George Armstrong Custer's ghost. Using these resources and the information you learned in class, write a letter to your wife Elizabeth "Libbie" Bacon Custer explaining what went wrong at the Battle of the Little Bighorn which ultimately led to the demise of you and your men. In your letter, include an analysis of strategic errors, who was to blame for the defeat, and what you would do differently if you had a second chance to fight the battle.

Brandon Peifer
13
 

Portraits of James Baldwin

This student activity begins with an analysis of two portraits of James Baldwin by different artists. Then, students are asked to create their own portrait of Baldwin by remixing source material from this collection. Student portraits should answer the following questions:

1. How do you think James Baldwin should be remembered?

2. What are Baldwin's contributions to American life and culture?

Students may need to do additional research on Baldwin and his life in order to complete this assessment. This is an opportunity for students to learn about and explore the life of a revolutionary writer who presents a unique view of the civil rights movement and status of African-Americans in the United States.

Kate Harris
25
 

An Introduction to Origami Paper Folding

In this activity, students will be introduced to the art of origami paper folding by learning how this tradition has been passed down through generations from an interview with an artisan and how to make an origami paper crane from a fellow student.
Ashley Naranjo
4
 

Madelyn Eichenlaub Sarah Leist

Period

Sarah Leist
15
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