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Found 5,994 Collections

 

George Washington - Visual Analysis

George Washington is often portrayed as the larger-than-life Father of our Nation. How do these portrayals compare to actual facts about Washington's life?

Rachel Foltz
11
 

Art + Text, an In-Gallery Activity

Developed for Art and the African American Experience

What is the relationship between anger and hope? When faced with cruelty, how might a community respond? Use close looking strategies to unlock meaning in a 1960s-era painting, then engage in textual analysis and discussion to explore these essential questions.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
7
 

Origami Animals: Demonstration Videos and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll find interviews with origami artists and a variety of demonstration videos to make paper animals (bull, butterfly, crane) and a paper wallet. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity.

Grab some paper and have fun!


Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Origami Cranes: Activity and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll explore the tradition of the origami Japanese paper crane, a symbol of hope. A demonstration video is included for those who want to make their own crane. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity. 

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

Life after the Civil War

Pictures and artifacts depicting life after the civil war

Kasey Winegar
1
 

Mammals: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
11
 

Frederick Douglass and "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?"

In this collection, students will review the life of Frederick Douglass and learn about one of his most famous speeches, "The Meaning of Fourth of July for the Negro" (it is also commonly referred to as "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July). They will explore the strategies he uses to persuade and compare staged readings of the speech. Next, they will consider the central question posed by Douglass--how does the history of racial injustice in the United States affect our understanding of national symbols and what they mean? In addition, how do the diverse opinions of the many citizens of the United States present both challenges and opportunities for our nation?

Teachers may draw relevant connections to today and recent protests during the national anthem by professional, collegiate, and high school sports teams.

Kate Harris
13
 

Mass Extinction - Solving the Dinosaur Mystery

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on the end-Cretaceous extinction event that included dinosaurs. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of the evidence for and causes of the mass extinction. Paleobotanist Dr. Kirk Johnson is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

Key Terms:

paleontology, dinosaur, fossil record, mass extinction, asteroid, Cretaceous period, K-T boundary

Key Concepts:

  • Extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous
  • Causes of mass extinction events
  • Interpreting ecosystem changes through fossils
  • Reconstructing ancient environments
  • Technology used by paleontologists
Smithsonian Science How
13
 

Women's Suffrage

Betsy Clem
7
 

1950's

1950's

Brandon Peifer
15
 

George Catlin Letter

Students will compare George Catlin's remarks in his letters with selected paintings from his collection. Students should read through the text passage, which contains excerpts from one of George Catlin's letters home. Teachers may want to consider having a print out of this text for students to view while also looking at images. As students read, they will match each painting to a paragraph in the text.

Michelle Moses
11
 

Art reflecting Life

Art, posters and artifacts that reflect events and viewpoints changing over time. Make sure you refer back to the questions on canvas!

magough
7
 

Forensic Anthropology Case: Discovering Jane

Teaching guide introducing a forensic case file from 2012, when Jamestown archaeologists excavated fragments of a human skull and leg bone dating to the winter of 1609-1610. This collection was created with the Anthropology team at the National Museum of Natural History.

(http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/Jane.html )

Anthony Cox
19
 

Battle of Bunker Hill Story Creation

Using the information on the documents included, students will work to complete the story outline and then as a class put on a reenactment of the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Thomas Gray
11
 
 

Engineering Flight

This collection is designed to teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation.

The first segment is a brief introduction to the forces of flight dynamics. The second segment is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way", where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. The final segment is an online interactive to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian.

For a full, downloadable lesson plan, visit:
https://airandspace.si.edu/files/pdf/lesson-plans/wright-way-lesson.pdf

The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.
The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.
RoseAnn LaBrocca
7
 

Was Reconstruction a Failure?

The period after the Civil War, known as Reconstruction, had lofty goals for reuniting the nation and preserving the new rights given to African-Americans. For a time, these goals were achieved and three important amendments were made to the Constitution. However, by 1876 Reconstruction was considered over and much of the progress that had been made was undone. This collection of detailed prints and cartoons highlight many different aspects of Reconstruction and asks students to consider the overall result of Reconstruction. Students can analyze each one using the embedded questions.
Classroom Goddess
8
 

Struggle For Justice

Rachel Slezak
30
 

Immigration

English 102 Montgomery College.
Claudia Casasola
19
 

immigration 102

Chauncy Morris
7
 

Native Environment

Embraces The Natives image and the original environment of America.

Robert Williams
5
 

Immigration

Blake Morton
9
 

immigration 102

Sloan Dolan
4
 

Mexican Immigration

Eduardo Hernandez
8
4705-4728 of 5,994 Collections