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Found 637 Collections

 

Image Analysis: San Francisco Chinatown

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American traditions and culture through resources related to San Francisco's Chinatown. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
10
 

Chinese Gold Miners

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American gold miners. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
4
 

Object Analysis & Compare and Contrast: Asian Steamer

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese-American traditions and culture through resources related to cooking and community. Each artifact, video and image includes open-ended, close-looking questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese-American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
3
 

America support for the French in World War 2 #TeachingInquiry

This collection focuses on the time when America joined with the Allies to defeat Germany in World War 2. 

My compelling question is: What impact did the arrival of the Americans have in the occupied villages in France in World War 2?

Ros Mattner
8
 

Chinese Wok: Object Analysis

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American traditions and culture through resources related to cooking and community. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
6
 

Photograph Analysis: Dorothea Lange's War Relocation Authority Images

In this collection, students will analyze a single photograph taken during the Japanese American incarceration era in San Francisco, CA in 1942. It shows residents of Japanese ancestry appearing for registration prior to evacuation as mandated by Executive Order 9066, with a young woman as the focal point of the image. Complementary articles, images, and videos support a deeper contextual understanding of the image and the intentions of the photographer, Dorothea Lange, in capturing this moment in time. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion about Japanese American incarceration, as well as an opportunity to analyze visual clues and details of a complex photograph.

Keywords: War Relocation Authority, EO9066, internment, World War II  relocation centers

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
14
 

Early North American weapons

This collection will have the theme of weapons in North America. This includes both colonial weapons and local native american weapons. As weapons have been both a tool of oppression and a tool for diplomacy and survival since ancient times, this collection will focus on showcasing the different weapons used before 1865 and their most likely purpose.

Anime fan
10
 

The Pony Express

This collection was created to display the importance of the  1860 Mailing Service known as The Pony Express. During the beginning of the Civil War messages were being sent out to war generals, soldiers and even enemy attackers. but in the 1800s there was no such thing as fast mail delivery. Letters and documents would take weeks or even months To be delivered to whom It was addressed. Many people saw this as a problem that no one could fix. But Russell, Majors, Waddell and William H. Russell Saw it as an opportunity to not only help America in the time of need but to also make a little money. The Pony Express was known for delivering mail in 10 days or less which was something that was unheard of and never done in this time period. And even though the Pony Express was only in business for 18 months it's shifted the views of mail carrying forever. In this collection you will see 12 Representations that are connected to the Pony Express.

Recruitment flyer

The Riders Oath

William Cody A.K.A Buffalo Bill

"La Mochila"  

The life of a rider

The Faces of The Pony Express

The Deadly route

Badge of honor

The Revolver

The trustee stead

Hollenberg Pony Express Station

The Special delivery


Karell Russell
12
 

Textiles of the 18th century

In the 18th century, Americans began consuming unnecessary things. For example, people would buy plates with exquisite arts not because they genuinely need, but to put on display for others see. This conspicuous consumption is apparent more so among the higher class than the lower level mostly because they must prioritize and differentiate true necessities. Colonists shift from using homemade to premium fabric, without knowing quilts and coverlets became a unifying factor American society.

During the early colonial period, colonists imported linen and wool as a token from home. As the desire for textiles increased the, now colonists switched from wool to cotton because of the more accessible access. There are two types quilts: homemade and commercial. People began to stray away from quilts made of old clothes to purchase premium pieces of cloths. These premium fabrics had scenes of our past presidents, such as The Victory of Washington and The Apotheosis of Franklin. Another design people used for quilts and coverlets during this time was block printing.  Block printing is when you stamp ink on to a regular piece of fabric repeatedly to create a uniform pattern.

Angeney Metelus
11
 

American Colonies and Native Americans Musical Hobbies

During the colonial era in the United States, American Colonists and Native Americans, worked every single day if it is either with agriculture or as a merchant.   

Not only did people worked hard every day in their lives in America, they also had fun in many ways. Music is one of the many ways they enjoyed their past time. Colonists and Native Americans alike had their own ways in playing music.

Native Americans where the first people to inhabit the United States. They have done many things like constructing their tribes, going to war with other tribes, hunt, and help grow their agricultural lands. There are also ways they enjoyed their past times, for example music. In the artifacts of this collection show how Native Americans interacted with their environment, the type of instruments they used to play music, and how they played music.

Colonists, like Native Americans, also had to work. Some colonists were indentured servants working for many years to pay off their debt to someone.  Other colonists were farmers merchants, plantation owners, or blacksmiths. Each had to work hard for them and their family, but they enjoyed music in their free time. The artifacts in the collection shows the type of instruments they used, which are different form what the Native Americans use, and musical pieces they might have played at that time.

Yailin Pena-Martinez
12
 

Consumer Revolution

The Consumer Revolution was a period between the 1600's and mid 1700's where the American colonies completely changed there societies values and status. The consumer revolution was a time where people found more value in things and how they look. They wanted these things as a way to say "I'm rich and of high class and status". The revolution didn't only effect white rich male  colonists but people of many different backgrounds such as blacks, Indians, poor people and women. It's a period in history where class and prestige brought people together as well as make them more divided . What people wanted had completely changed from buying that they needed in life to buying things to serve as a symbol status and wealth. This collection will show different artifacts that show that the colonists found more value in objects that symbolized wealth more then anything else.

serena white
10
 

Origami Cranes: Activity and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll explore the tradition of the origami Japanese paper crane, a symbol of hope. A demonstration video is included for those who want to make their own crane. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity. 

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

Origami Animals: Demonstration Videos and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll find interviews with origami artists and a variety of demonstration videos to make paper animals (bull, butterfly, crane) and a paper wallet. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity.

Grab some paper and have fun!


Philippa Rappoport
5
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Adam Baer
20
 

Egypt

Hayley Duralia
3
 

History of Amelia Earhart

Hayley Duralia
3
 

Exploring Identity: How can portraiture conceal or reveal?

What is identity? How is it constructed? These activities investigate how portraits can conceal or reveal aspects of identity. How does the artist choose to portray an individual? How does the sitter choose to be shown?

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group. It begins with a discussion about identity, using the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine and a comparison of two portraits to further push students' thinking on how portraiture can both conceal and reveal aspects of identity. In the next parts of the activity, students are able to choose from a variety of portraits for individual reflection and then come together as a group to discuss a larger work to about culture and identity. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking. 


Part I: Chalk Talk and comparing portraits

Students participate in the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine using the questions provided. A quick gallery walk where students circulate and read all responses can allow the class to get a feel for the many (or singular) perspective(s) of identity. Using the See-Think-Wonder Thinking Routine, students compare and contrast two portraits: LL Cool J by Kehinde Wiley and John D. Rockefeller by John Singer Sargent. Students can share with a neighbor and then out to the larger group or simply share out as a large group depending on class size, etc. 

 

Part II: Portraiture and Identity

Using the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet, students can choose one image from the fifteen provided and spend some time exploring their selected portrait. Students can be given 5-10 minutes to interact with their chosen image. Using one of Roger Shimomura’s portraits, students will use the Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine to better understand the many layers to this work of art. Again, students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Returning to chosen portrait and final reflection

Students will once again return to their selected portrait and complete the "second look" section of the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet. A final reflection about identity and portraiture can be completed either as a group or individually using the I Used to think…; But Now I Think… Thinking Routine.

#NPGteach

Emily Veres
23
 

Harlem Renaissance

This collection helps guide students as they learn about the Harlem Renaissance. There are 3 steps to the lesson:

  1. As a class, students use the "see, think, wonder" visual thinking routine to analyze a painting.
  2. Students watch a video and answer questions about the Harlem Renaissance.
  3. Students individually analyze 6 examples of art from the Harlem Renaissance, including paintings, music, and poetry and connect each piece to the historical context.

Michelle Moses
9
 

Communes, Counterculture, and the Back to the Land Movement

This collection includes a variety of photographs taken by Lisa Law. Students will examine the photographs and a few artifacts and try to draw conclusions about the ways in which the commune or back-to-the-land movement challenged the norms of traditional United States society in the 1960s and 1970s. A link to an exhibit website is include and allows students to check their assumptions, and students are asked to compare elements of the counterculture with that of mainstream 1960s and 1970s culture.

Tags: counterculture, commune, hippie, granola, back to nature, communal living, co-op, cooperative, sixties, seventies, Woodstock, change over time, compare, ashram, silent majority

Susan Ogilvie
10
 

Expressive Self Portrait

Art 3 students will compare the elements and principles in each image and distinguish their aesthetic qualities of expression. 

Jinni Copp
15
 

Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) The Will to Adorn

 
The Will to Adorn is a multi-year collaborative folk cultural research and public presentation project initiated by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.This project explores the diversity of African American identities as expressed through the cultural aesthetics and traditional arts of the body, dress, and adornment.

Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, CA was one of the participant museums in the 2017 The Will to Adorn project. Six high school students examined African-American fashion in the San Francisco Bay Area. 

Through a combination of street photography, museum visits, field trips and interviews with Bay Area fashion creators and trend setters we took a closer look at the different ways African-American fashion is expressed.

This is a collection of their photographs curated by the program coordinator.



Richard Collins
90
 

Destination Moon: Suiting Up for Space

How did the space suit come to look the way it does? From the United States Navy's Mark IV pressure suit to the Apollo AL7 model, this collection explores its evolution. Investigate the hotspots in each image, and watch the videos included. Try to put yourself in the place of an astronaut - what are their needs, and wants? 

Next, investigate the roadmap for the developing Mars One mission. How will a Mars mission differ from the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs?

After exploring the collection, see if you can redefine the "space suit" problem for the next generation of space explorers - specifically those going to Mars.  Will astronauts need more mobility? More protection? What insights did you gain from looking at this collection? Write down the problem and any critical information gained. 

Additional Activities: 

1. Come up with as many solutions as you can to the defined problem. Don't worry about testing them all - let your imagination run wild - and challenge yourself to come up with lots of different solutions. 

2. Talk with a partner to see which solution has the most merit between you both. Refine your idea based on this conversation. 

Finally, prototype! Use simple, inexpensive materials to model your design. 

Christina Ferwerda
7
 

Destination Moon: Apollo Around the Country

This collection explores regional contractors that contributed to the Apollo Program. Union Carbide, North American Aviation, and RCA are just three of the many private firms that contributed goods and services to NASA during the race to put a man on the Moon. 

Have students examine the map of NASA contractors. Ask: 

  • What companies do you know? 
  • Which are closest? Farthest away?
  • What do you wonder about these companies? Their locations? 

Have students investigate the images in the collection. Discuss: 

  • What do you see? What do you think about that? 
  • What types of products or materials were needed on the Apollo mission? 
  • How did companies take advantage of their association with Manned Spaceflight? 

Using the map, encourage students to find items produced by other manufacturers on this database by searching the manufacturer name. Compare the products associated with different companies - what types of products do they see, and what types of products are missing? Are there advantages to having certain things produced closer to the launch site? What types of items could be produced farther away? 

Invite students to find other Apollo-related advertisements from the period using the Internet. What can be said about these advertisements? 

Invite students to create their own advertisement based on the items they find here, as well as research about the NASA-contracted company. 

Christina Ferwerda
12
 

Destination Moon: NASA Art

Established in 1962, the NASA Artists Cooperation Program gave several artists unrestricted access to several NASA facilities. The goal was to communicate the emotional tone and the cultural significance of space exploration.

This collection uses the "Connect Extend Challenge" visible thinking strategy developed by Project Zero at Harvard University. This strategy encourages students to make connections between new ideas and prior knowledge. It also encourages them to make a personal connection to an artwork or topic.

This lesson helps teachers create connections between works of art and the study of space exploration, and to help teachers use art as a force for developing students’ critical thinking.  

Observe and discuss the first image as a class. Use the "Connect Extend Challenge" to discuss the image as a class. Ask the following: 

  • How is the artwork or object connected to something you know about?
  • What new ideas or impressions do you have that extended your thinking in new directions?
  • What is challenging or confusing? What do you wonder about?

Provide any background knowledge that enhances the conversation, using the metadata information about the NASA Artists Cooperation Program. 

Next, divide the students into 4 groups. Have them use the same questions to discuss one of the 4 images that deals the Apollo 11 launch. Wrap-up the discussion by having each group share out key thoughts and responses. Repeat the same process with the 4 images that represent Mission Control (note, Mission Control Images are from a selection of Apollo missions). 

Finally, students should choose one of the final 4 images to investigate, using the "Connect Extend Challenge" to guide their exploration. Their work could be shared verbally in a paired group, or written as a personal essay. 


Christina Ferwerda
13
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