Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(118)
(390)
(464)
(413)
(496)
(5)
(227)
(176)
(107)
(312)
(149)
(203)

Found 508 Collections

 

Historical Representation of Pocahontas in North America from 1614-2010

Pocahontas is a name well known to many due to her vast representation in everyday culture and society. She is the daughter of the chief of the Powhatan tribe and is well known for her relationship with John Smith and the early settlers of Virginia.This is a collection showing how Pocahontas has been depicted by different people across the time period 0f 1614-2010. These different depictions show how various cultures viewed Native American society and specifically Pocahontas. Through these various depictions one can see how the traditional view of Pocahontas evolved over time. Differences can also be seen in the depiction across different cultures and different mediums. Particularly the contrasting images of Pocahontas in native clothing and Pocahontas in Colonial-style clothing. The representation of Pocahontas is important because she is a crucial figure in the development of early Colonial America, specifically Jamestown in Virgina. Although, her name is known throughout the United States today in connection with John Smith and the Establishment of the Virginian colony of Jamestown.

Kelly Northcraft
10
 

How a Bill becomes a Law

How can ideas become legislation? This student activity reviews the process of how a bill becomes a law. Students may choose from two videos to watch, and then can read through the collection and investigate the resources. They may want to take notes on the process. Finally, a sorting activity assesses whether or not students truly understand the process of creating new legislation in the United States.

Kate Harris
12
 

Responses to Immigration: Then and Now

This collection will prompt thinking about attitudes towards new immigrants throughout our nation's history. What has changed and what has stayed the same?

It is also designed to allow users to explore the range of technical features and content resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.

tags: immigrant, America, assimilate, nativism, stereotypes

Kate Harris
10
 

Should President Truman have dropped the Atomic Bomb(s) on Japan during World War II?

The following pieces in this collection look at the Pacific Theater of World War II and President Truman's decision to use the world's first atomic weapons on Japan. As students work through this collection, they should take their outside knowledge to form an opinion on whether the decision to drop the atomic bombs were justifiable with military necessitiy.

Matthew Stagl
13
 

Human management of natural resources and why it is important.

What resources do humans use in their every day lives? Why do we need to limit and protect the resources that we use, both renewable and nonrenewable? What effects are there when resources are not managed correctly? How are people protecting resources and finding solutions today? #TeachingInquiry

Naomi Warf
17
 

APUSH WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Molly Chester
14
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Lisa Major
32
 

Portraits of James Baldwin

This student activity begins with an analysis of two portraits of James Baldwin by different artists. Then, students are asked to create their own portrait of Baldwin by remixing source material from this collection. Student portraits should answer the following questions:

1. How do you think James Baldwin should be remembered?

2. What are Baldwin's contributions to American life and culture?

Students may need to do additional research on Baldwin and his life in order to complete this assessment. This is an opportunity for students to learn about and explore the life of a revolutionary writer who presents a unique view of the civil rights movement and status of African-Americans in the United States.

Kate Harris
25
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Edward Elbel
30
 

What's in a name?

This collection is based on a lesson in Bruce Lesh's "Why Won't You Just Tell Us the Answer?" and on a Smithsonian National Museum of American History lesson (both cited fully below). In this lesson, students will evaluate primary source material in order to develop an appropriate name for the site of the 1876 battle at Little Bighorn River. This collection allows students to explore the following questions:

  • Why do different interpretations of history develop? How do they change over time?
  • When thinking about conflicts in history, whose perspectives are valued and remembered?

tags: Custer, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Little Big Horn, continuity, change over time, perspective, historiography, point of view, Native American, indigenous, American Indian, Sioux, Greasy Grass

Kate Harris
18
 

Aspects of the New Deal

Each item in this collection matches a part of the New Deal. Students must justify their answer using evidence in the image.

Michelle Moses
5
 

J. Edgar hoover

lead investigator of the FBI (federal Bureau of Investigation of the United States) from 1935 to 1972

kane mcluckie
8
 

Pangu and the Chinese Creation Story

This student activity teaches students about the Chinese creation story of Pangu and introduces them to other common symbols in ancient Chinese mythology.

Guiding questions include:

-How does this story compare to other creation myths you may know? Are there common elements?

-In what way does this story reflect a distinctly Chinese culture or system of belief?

Tags: Pan gu, Panku, creation, origin, myth, compare contrast, yin yang, Taoism, Daoism, Buddhism, Buddhism, Confucius, Laozi, dragon, qilin, turtle, phoenix, ancient China, religion

Anne Holmes
11
 

New Deal Organizations: Relief, Recovery, or Reform?

For each of the images in the collection, determine which New Deal organization it is representing. Think about whether that organization is a good example of relief, recovery, or reform. Some images can be used in more than one way, so be prepared to defend and explain your answers to the class.

Cory Williams
18
 

Geometry and Islamic Art

This is a collection of artifacts representing geometric motifs in Islamic art. Students will learn why these complex patterns are so prevalent in Islamic art, practice spotting different types of patterns, and begin to create their own, using just a ruler and a compass. They will also have an opportunity to explore the concept of tessellation using an interactive tool.

tags: geometry, circle, angle, star, mosque, mihrab, tile, Muslim, Islam, religion

Kate Harris
16
 

The Melting Pot at the United Shoe Machinery Corporation

This student activity includes a set of archival documents from the United Shoe Machinery Corporation. These documents can be used as resources to help students investigate the relationship between industry, education, and immigration in the early 20th century.

As students explore the collection, they should consider how each document helps them answer the following questions:

-Is it in the best interests of business to encourage citizenship and education? Why or why not?

-What do these materials say about what it means to be considered "American" in the early 20th century?

tags: school, learning, English, language, migration, Ellis Island, manufacturing, Progressives

Kate Harris
8
 

Reconstruction in the American South #TeachingInquiry

This collection contains images, lithographs, and written documents pertaining to the period of Reconstruction. Reconstruction marks the period in American history beginning in 1863 and lasting through 1877. This collection will help to better understand the role Reconstruction played in re-establishing race relations and enfranchising African Americans, but also the struggles African Americans faced in upholding their rights. People who view this collection will be able to analyze and respond to the question "Was Reconstruction successful?" #TeachingInquiry

Rania Assily
10
 

Look for the Helpers: Analyzing Social Movements

Mr. Rogers is quoted as saying, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping." This collection will give students a framework to "look for the helpers"--the people who are trying to change society for the better during difficult times. Students will be introduced to a variety of strategies and tactics used in social movements, and consider how these might apply to an area of their own interest.

Included is a chart listing possible strategies for social movements that encourages students to find examples of tactics/strategies from the collection and determine the goals of each.

Opportunities for extension include:

Identify a social movement that relies on more than one strategy (most do). Can you create a "recipe" listing the various tactics used to create a successful movement?

Who is involved? Choose one of the examples from above to study further. Who was involved in that particular tactic or strategy? Consider different occupations (teacher, writer, church leader, student, mother) and also different demographics (gender, race, age, ethnicity, etc.)

What's missing? Are there strategies that you have encountered in your research that don't fit into this chart?

Kate Harris
31
 

Balance & Symmetry

Ask students to identify which type of balance is represented in each artwork:

  • Symmetrical balance
  • Radial balance
  • Asymmetrical balance
Jean-Marie Galing
19
 

The Ramayana

This teaching collection and student activity includes the resources necessary to teach an EDSITEment lesson on the Ramayana where students read closely to find examples of the Hindu concept of dharma.

Guiding questions are:

  • What is dharma?
  • How does the Ramayana teach dharma, one of Hinduism's most important tenants?

tags: Hinduism, Hindu, India, dharma, Ramayana, rama, epic, Vishnu

Kate Harris
11
 

Attention-grabbing headlines don't always tell truth!

Attention-grabbing headlines don't always tell truth!

Pictures are powerful, sometimes edited!

Twitter doesn't tell whole story.


In the era of "fake news" and information overload, we all need to become better readers of the words and pictures that are used to explain what is going on in the world around us. In this activity, students and teachers will consider:

How can the choice of image or words convey different messages about current events? How do journalists and editors shape the news through their choices?

This student activity asks students to look at several images of young people resisting a law or recent event. Their task is to write two different headlines for that image designed to appeal to different audiences. They will also be asked to research the context for the image and to consider how that might impact their headlines.

The goals of this lesson are to:

  • explore image and word choice as news drivers (factors that make items newsworthy or appealing to readers)
  • determine how journalists and editors shape the news through their choices
  • encourage news literacy and a critical reading of headlines and photojournalism in the future.
Kate Harris
15
 

Modernism

An exploration of primary sources related to modernism and Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms.

Lisa Koch
39
 

My Favorite Things

In 2014-2015, artist and illustrator Maira Kalman created a personal collection that was displayed at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Her collection drew from across the Smithsonian museums and reflected a life story. Her inspiration and thinking is shared in the video resource that begins this collection, and some of the objects that she included (or similar ones) are shared.

Can you create your own collection of "favorite things"? What story would it tell? What people, places, and objects would it connect to? What emotions would it evoke?

tags: design, art, activity, personal, inspiration, creativity, biography

Kate Harris
6
 

Are student rights protected in school?

This collection explores a number of Supreme Court cases all looking at the rights students have in the American public school system. Students will encounter these court cases through primary and secondary sources, videos, photographs, podcasts, and historical objects. At the end of the lesson, students should be able construct an argument based off the compelling question "Are student rights protected in school?"

Leah Knecht
16
433-456 of 508 Collections