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Found 4,837,637 Resources

Couma utilis

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Couma utilis

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Pleiocarpa bicarpellata Stapf

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Lepinia ponapensis Hosok.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Plumeria rubra L.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Vallesia mexicana

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Vallesia mexicana

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Vallesia glabra (Cav.) Link

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Vallesia glabra (Cav.) Link

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Vallesia glabra (Cav.) Link

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Vallesia glabra (Cav.) Link

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Alyxia acuminata K. Schum.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

One Touch Test Strips

National Museum of American History

1930 - 1940 Flossie Haggards's "Butterfly" Child's Quilt

National Museum of American History
Handmade quilt in butterfly pattern. Made by Flossie Haggard between 1931 and 1934, stitched by hand and on Singer sewing machine. Family keepsake carried from Oklahoma to California during relocation of home by car and trailer via Route 66, 1935. Back of quilt made of sacks; some printed lettering faintly visible. Used on Flossie's bed.

Humulin 70/30

National Museum of American History
Humulin is human insulin used for treating diabetes. Prior to its development, diabetics used insulin isolated from pig and cow pancreases. Developed by Genentech, the first American biotechnology company, Humulin was licensed to Eli Lilly and became the first marketable product created through recombinant DNA technology. Its licensing by the FDA in October 1982 also made it the first recombinant pharmaceutical approved for use in the United States.

Recombinant pharmaceuticals are created by inserting genes from one species into a host species, often yeast or bacteria, where they do not naturally occur. The genes code for a desired product, and therefore the genetically modified host organisms can be grown and used as a kind of living factory to produce the product. In this case, genes coding for human insulin are inserted into bacteria. Bacteria produce insulin, which is harvested and used as the active ingredient in Humulin.

Humulin 70/30 is an intermediate-acting insulin combined with the more rapid onset of action of regular human insulin. The duration of activity may last up to 24 hours following injection.

Object is a sealed white cardboard box with black and red printing.

Humulin R, REGULAR

National Museum of American History
Humulin is human insulin used for treating diabetes. Prior to its development, diabetics used insulin isolated from pig and cow pancreases. Developed by Genentech, the first American biotechnology company, Humulin was licensed to Eli Lilly and became the first marketable product created through recombinant DNA technology. Its licensing by the FDA in October 1982 also made it the first recombinant pharmaceutical approved for use in the United States.

Recombinant pharmaceuticals are created by inserting genes from one species into a host species, often yeast or bacteria, where they do not naturally occur. The genes code for a desired product, and therefore the genetically modified host organisms can be grown and used as a kind of living factory to produce the product. In this case, genes coding for human insulin are inserted into bacteria. Bacteria produce insulin, which is harvested and used as the active ingredient in Humulin.

Humulin R is considered to be "regular" insulin and has had nothing added to change the speed or length of its action. It takes effect rapidly and has a relatively short duration of activity (6 to 8 hours), as compared with other insulin formulations.

Object is a sealed white cardboard box with black and red printing.

DiaScan-S

National Museum of American History

Hypocount Supreme

National Museum of American History

mirror

National Museum of American History
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