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Found 6,415 Collections

 

Communication

How do you communicate? Through words? Body language? A look? Explore this collection to see how people, and animals communicate.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
33
 

Earth Optimism Teen Conversations

The Earth Day Network describes the first Earth Day as a momentous event: On April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans — at the time, 10% of the total population of the United States — took to the streets, parks, and auditoriums to demonstrate for a healthy and sustainable environment in massive coast-to-coast rallies. Thousands of colleges and universities organized protests against the deterioration of the environment. https://www.earthday.org/history/.

In 2020, at the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day, many argue that there is still much work to be done. This collection of objects and resources challenges teens nationwide to ask and discuss the questions: What will the legacy of Earth Day and the conversation movement be 50 years from now?  How will we get there?

Included in this collection are themes, prompts, and resources to help guide your conversations. Discussion prompts are included within each section title square.

National Museum of American History
80
 

Immigration Policies and Legislation Affecting Asian Pacific Americans

This topical collection includes resources about immigration policies and legislation that affected, or specifically targeted, immigrants and those with ancestry from Asia and the Pacific Islands.  The policies and legislation profiled in this collection are not the only ones that did so by any means, however, they are some of the most significant.  Collection includes newspapers, objects, portraits, articles, and more.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions, such as those about immigration policy and/or discrimination. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: chinese exclusion act, 1882, wong chin foo, immigration act of 1917, literacy act, asiatic barred zone act, angel island, japanese incarceration, japanese internment, executive order 9088, 1942, world war ii, world war 2, immigration and nationality act of 1965, hart-celler act, immigration act of 1990, h-1b visa

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies


Tess Porter
52
 

Pittsburgh & Place

Includes iconic people, places, and things associated with Pittsburgh. In the classroom, these resources can be used by students to investigate two essential questions: How do you define Pittsburgh as a place? What does it mean to be a Pittsburgher? 

Supporting questions and activity implementation ideas are located under this collection's Information (i) button. Collection developed for the SI Learning Lab Pittsburgh workshops.

Keywords: pennsylvania 

Tess Porter
50
 

Chinese immigration experience to Texas featuring Jim Eng's story

This collection includes resources about focusing on the story of Jim Eng (Ng San Wah) who immigrated to Texas when he was seven years old. Included are the various documents that he and his mom needed to immigrate and excerpts from his oral history are included.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions , such as those about immigration policy and/or discrimination. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. Documents are included to guide students through analysis activities of the documents, photos and oral history.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: chinese exclusion act, 1882,

 #EthnicStudies

Melanie Schwebke
29
 

Segregation, Integration, and the Civil Rights Movements in Baseball and the United States Postal Service

Issues of racial inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining the complicated and problematic history of segregation, integration, and the Civil Rights Movement with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. In the classroom, these artifacts, articles, and videos can be used to explore the common and diverging ways that segregation manifested itself in Major League Baseball and the Postal Service. Students will also be able to explore how individuals in both institutions combatted this segregation through movements for integration and, beyond that, a broader expansion of opportunity for African-American individuals in these institutions. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze the thematic significance of artistic depictions of African-American and white ballplayers and, more specifically, what these depictions communicated about these two racial groups and their place in the sport of baseball. Supporting questions and further ideas for classroom application can be found in the "Notes to Other Users" section.



National Postal Museum
31
 

Photography and News

Guiding Questions:

  • How much of a story can a photo tell? What are the limits?
  • Why do journalists take photos?
  • How is news photography different than other types of photography? What is photojournalism?

Time- 1-2 class periods with optional extension activities

This collection provides an opportunity for students to consider a first impression of news photos through careful image analysis. The initial viewing of the image is followed by reading historical newspaper articles or other primary sources about the event in question to compare their thinking with some context to their initial impressions. Images can be powerful and can greatly influence our impression of events, but without context, we can form inaccurate impressions based on our own biases. Students need to be careful and critical viewers of media as well as media creators. Images include events covered in history/social studies courses such as the Civil Rights Movement, Little Rock Nine, World War II, Japanese internment,  9/11, the Detroit Riots, the Scopes trial, women’s suffrage, Dolores Huerta and United Farm Workers, and the Vietnam War.

Day 1:

Warm Up/ Engagement:

Have students journal or a mind-map about the following questions:

  • How much of a story can a photo tell? What are the limits?
  • Why do journalists take photos?
  • What is photojournalism?
  • How is news photography different than other types of photography?

Have them do a Think-Pair-Share

Debrief as a whole group

As a whole group, discuss the photo of the female students who integrated Central High School in Little Rock. Do not show the caption to students. The global competency thinking routine, “Unveiling Stories,” is good to use for news or other current event photos because it allows students the opportunity to explore multiple layers of meaning.

Once students have discussed the image, show them the caption. Then give additional background on the Little Rock Nine. To review/background on the Little Rock Nine, consider exploring resources from Facing History and Ourselves. There is a New York Times article listed below as well.

Next, go back and look at photo with the caption and see how the initial understanding has shifted with the Connect-Extend-Challenge routine. This is a thinking routine that is great for connecting new ideas to prior knowledge.

Day 2

Have students read the article from the Click! Exhibit, “Photography Changes How We Read the World.”

After reading, lead students through the What Makes You Say That? Routine which encourages interpretation with justification and evidence.

Small Group Jigsaw activity

In pairs or small groups, assign one image in the collection to each group. Make sure they know they will present their findings to the whole class. Have them go through the “Unveiling Stories” routine with their new image. Give students 10 mins to record their thoughts and ideas on chart paper or sticky notes. Next, give each group the related primary source news article (listed below through ProQuest) or your choice of a primary source. Have students read the article together. Then, have them go back to the image and do the Connect-Extend-Challenge routine while visualizing their thinking on the same chart paper or with additional sticky notes.

Have each group share out and summarize their findings from their initial reaction to how their thinking changed after reading an additional primary source.

As a final debrief, make sure that students reflect on their learning from their image analysis.

A great reflection routine is “I used to think… Now I think…”. Have students complete this routine with the topic of photojournalism/news photography.

Extensions

Readings:

Audio:

Exhibit:

Project:

  • Report on an event with images and in writing  

Companion Article Sources on ProQuest Historical Newspapers:

For 9/11 Photos-

A CREEPING HORROR

KLEINFIELD N R

New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 12, 2001;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. A1

For D-Day Photo:

Allies Seize Beachheads on French Coast, Invasion Forces Drive Toward Interior

By the War Editor of The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file); Jun 6, 1944; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 2001) pg. 1

For Detroit Riot Photo:

Detroit Is Swept by Rioting and Fires; Romney Calls In Guard; 700 Arrested

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jul 24, 1967;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Vietnam Withdrawal Photo:

A Farewell to Vietnam: 2 Flown Out Tell Story

New York Times (1923-Current file); Apr 28, 1975;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Dolores Huerta Photo:

Farm Labor Law Chances Improve

By Susan Jacoby Washington Post Staff Writer

The Washington Post, Times Herald (1959-1973); May 2, 1969; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Washington Post (1877 - 1998) pg. A24

For Little Rock Photo:

STUDENTS ACCEPT NEGROES CALMLY

By BENJAMIN FINE Special to The New York Times.

New York Times (1923-Current file); Sep 26, 1957;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011)

For WWII/D-Day Photos:

PARADE OF PLANES CARRIES INVADERS

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jun 6, 1944;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Scopes Trial Photo:

DEFENSE CASE IS OUTLINED

Special to The New York Times.

New York Times (1923-Current file); Jul 16, 1925;

ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851 - 2011) pg. 1

For Women’s Suffrage March Photo: WOMEN PARADE FOR SUFFRAGE AT CAPITAL

The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file); Mar 3, 1913; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 2001) pg. 1

#visiblethinking


Allie Wilding
20
 

Investigating a Place: Texas, a U.S. State Collection

This state collection utilizes stamps, artworks, photographs, and videos in the Smithsonian's collection to highlight 65 iconic people, places, events and symbols of Texas' history and culture. Students might explore one resource in depth, or conduct a comparison of multiple resources. Follow-up questions might include: What sub-themes can you identify within this collection? What do these resources as a collection tell you about Texas? What marks someone as a "Texan"--is it birthplace alone? What other resources would you want to include to tell a more complete story of Texas history and culture?
Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Aral Sea: Exploring Change Over Time with Satellite Imagery

This teaching collection includes maps and satellite images, complemented by image interpretation guides and related magazine articles, for students to discover what natural causes and human impacts have had consequences for the Aral Sea. The Aral Sea has been a continuously shrinking body of water over the last 50 years after the rivers that fed into it were diverted by irrigation projects. Learn what you can discover by annotating change through satellite imagery.
Ashley Naranjo
17
 

Bodies

This collection is comprised of artwork and objects that reflect a variety of bodies and the amazing things bodies can do. 

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
75
 

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer

The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers' bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join STEM in 30 as we investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and into the history books.

December 14, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
34
 

How to Care for a Garden: A Study of Humans and Gardens

Gardens come in many shapes and sizes. Some contain flowers and are aesthetically pleasing to the eye. Others contain fruits and vegetables to be eaten and enjoyed. But behind most gardens are the hands and toiling work of humans, working to create that space for its intended purpose. 

This collection will allow you to explore various artwork depicting gardens and either their gardeners or people that use the space for various purposes. Consider how the people are using the space. What materials or tools do they use to aid them when interacting with the garden? Also think about the location and era of each garden. How do people's interactions with their natural environment stay the same or change? What processes remain and how do humans change the landscape of gardens, for better or worse?

Gardens often require humans to tend and take care of them. Within this collection, students will analyze how people across the world take care of and use garden spaces. Use the Garden Anticipation Guide to assess before and after the unit what students know about gardens. 

Essential Questions:

  • What does a gardener do to help plants grow?
  • What tools does a gardener use?
  • What can we do to help our school/community garden grow?

Big Idea: As students work with this collection to answer the essential questions, they will understand that:

  • A plant needs water, sunlight and soil to grow.
  • Gardeners work in the garden and help it grow.
  • Gardens have many uses, for enjoyment and events, as well as for growing food.
  • We can take care of our school/community garden and help the plants grow, too.

Lesson Sequence:

  • Administer the Garden Anticipation Guide before starting the unit.
    • Look for common misconceptions or misunderstandings.
  • Preview images in the collection and have students do a See, Think, Wonder thinking routine.
  • Have students compare 2 images side by side to see similarities and differences in what the gardens look like, but also how they are used.
  • Sort the collection based on the uses of each garden.
  • Consider how they want to treat their school/community garden based on these images.
  • Read Aloud Lesson "In My Garden" to learn more garden vocabulary.
  • Administer the Garden Anticipation Guide at the end of the unit.


    • See what students have learned and if you have addressed any misconceptions.

#LearnWithTR

Keywords: garden, people, humans, gardener, flowers, space, tools, fruits, vegetables, plants, landscape, environment, gardening

Meghan Sanchez
37
 

Indian Wars: Dissolution of Native American Territory 1885-1900

This student activity examines what events that contributed to the change in Native American reservation boundaries over time. Includes videos that explain Native and American conflicts, maps of reservation territory in 1851-1900, readings, discussion questions, and an opportunity to learn more using an interactive map.

Jill Stedman
21
 

Deep Time

This collection serves as a preview for the second of six seminar sessions in the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." 

Two Smithsonian staff members, Scott Wing and Laura Soul, will discuss content and educational materials related to the National Museum of Natural History exhibition, Deep Time. 

Resources included in this collection have been recommended by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Four Women Who Made American History

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture.

These videos were created for a middle school audience and above.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
11
 

How Did Mia Hamm Inspire More Women to Play Sports?

Mia Hamm helped popularize soccer in the U.S. and inspire a new generation of athletes.

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Mia Hamm Inspire More Women to Play Sports?, Kamau, a student, speaks with Eric Jentsch, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, about Hamm's legacy.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
12
 

How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?

In 1970, activist Angela Davis was charged with murder. A movement arose to free her, and her time in jail Her time in jail inspired her to work to change the prison system. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?, Kemi, a student, talks with Kelly Elaine Navies, oral historian at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story.#BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
22
 

Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa?

Celia Cruz celebrated her Cuban American identity as one of the first women salsa singers. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In Why Is Celia Cruz Called the Queen of Salsa?,Mincy, a student, speaks with Ariana A. Curtis, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
23
 

How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights?

In 1977, 13 years before the American with Disabilities Act, Kitty Cone and other disability rights activists occupied a federal building in San Francisco. They demanded the government protect their rights.

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights?, Ren, a student, speaks with Katherine Ott, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, about why Cone’s work matters.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
17
 

Practice Telling Time

This collection includes a variety of images of clock faces to use with young learners who are practicing skills in telling time with analog clocks featuring Arabic numerals. Teachers can use these images to help students tell and write time to the nearest minute.  The images range from clocks in isolation to clocks used in artworks and finally, clocks in context through photography. Additional resources are included to provide further teaching context on the concept of time.

Ashley Naranjo
25
 

Nubia WW1 Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to effectively show what I learned about WW1. 

Jonathan Nubia
7
 

Harlem Renaissance Art

A collection of art and photographs from the Harlem renaissance.
Kimberly Briggs
5
 

WWI Artifacts

To show others the events of WWI in detail 

avery murphy
7
 

Julie Hernandez-WWI Artifacts

This collection explores America's contributions to and involvement in the first World War. 

Julie Hernandez
7
409-432 of 6,415 Collections