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Found 6,073 Collections

 

Africans vs African Americans

adriean gabriel
6
 

Behind Design: Inka Bridge

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, INCA BRIDGE, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In or See Think Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Weaving the Bridge at Q'eswacha. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
32
 

Comprehending the Spread of Nigerian dance

Research Journal Assignment HIST350.003
Michael Anthony
17
 

Influential Americans

This collection is designed to support teachers and students exploring the 2020 National History Day theme: Breaking Barriers in History. Included in this collection is an overview of influential Americans aligned with the NHD theme.

These resources - including  photographs, primary source documents, portraits, and articles - explore the efforts of people from Pocahontas to Walt Disney in breaking social, artistic, gender, and economic barriers throughout American history. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; rather, it is intended to act as a starting point and provide inspiration for further research. 

#NHD2020

Abigail Burnett
98
 

The Struggle Between Law Enforcement and African Americans

Ever since African Americans have step foot in America it has been a trial. They have been beaten psychically, abused verbally, and isolated socially. This journal touches on a matter that til this the day the conflict is still unsolved. This journal will view the struggles between Law Enforcement and the African American community. 

destiny gaskins
14
 

The Struggle Between Law Enforcement and African Americans

Ever since African Americans have step foot in America it has been a trial. They have been beaten psychically, abused verbally, and isolated socially. This journal touches on a matter that til this the day the conflict is still unsolved. This journal will view the struggles between Law Enforcement and the African American community. 

Peter Mensah
14
 

Activists: Women Who Shaped History

This topical collection includes resources related to featured women activists. This collection includes portraits of the activists, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the life stories of activists, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. 

Keywords: Fannie Lou Hamer, Ida B. Wells, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Edith Windsor, Wilma Mankiller, Grace Lee Boggs, Pauli Murray, Shirley Chisholm, Rachel Carson, Zitkala-Sa, #BecauseOfHerStory

Leslie Schaffer
70
 

Black Athletes in America

A breakdown of African American Athletes from the time sports became integrated with other races. Light shed on the dominance of Black Athletes in a country that doesn't respect them. 

Jeremy Hazzard
7
 

Fela Kuti

Fela Kuti the inventor/ innovator / creator of afrobeats. He gave Africans a voice during the corruption and desegregation of black people in both America and Africa. Fela went to jail at least 200 times in spite being a famous musician and died of AIDS and heart problems at the age of 58

Femi Adewumi
10
 

Evolution of Nigerian Music

This journal discusses the time period of how Nigerian music has evolved due to cultural changes. Within the journal you will listen and be able to see how the music has evolved and how Nigerian musicians use different types of instruments to attract a variety of audiences. 

Destiny Enwerem
22
 

Evolution of Makeup in the Black Community

This is my African Diaspora class Online Journal Project. I discuss the evolution of black women in the beauty industry from 1970's until present day.

Shaiye McNeal
7
 

Beauty and Truth: The Dust Bowl

This collection explores Alexandre Hogue's 1933 painting Dust Bowl through a global thinking routine called "Beauty and Truth." Supporting materials help build historical and scientific context.

“Some may feel that in these paintings . . . I may have chosen an unpleasant subject, but after all the [drought] is most unpleasant. To record its beautiful moments without its tragedy would be false indeed. At one and the same time the [drought] is beautiful in its effects and terrifying in its results. The former shows peace on the surface but the latter reveals tragedy underneath. Tragedy as I have used it is simply visual psychology, which is beautiful in a terrifying way.” -Alexandre Hogue


Phoebe Hillemann
11
 

#BecauseOfHerStory: Exploring Untold Stories through Portraiture and American Art

This collection features resources related to a November 22, 2019 session presented at the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference. 

Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

RELATED WEBINAR SERIES (recordings available): https://americanart.si.edu/education/k-12/professional-development/webinars

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Phoebe Hillemann
19
 

Discrimination of African American Hair

The purpose of this collection is to talk about the discrimination of African American hair. I will be explaining types of discrimination and how it has effected some people while in their work place, school and in their daily life. I also mention how some states have made laws to protect our people from these situations. 

kayla moore
5
 

Substance Abuse in Black Communities

This collection aims to provide examples of the effects that substance/ alcohol abuse has on those within the black community. This collection will be of images of art, music, television shows and poetry. I will explain the connection of these items I have chosen and explain why they connect to or impact the African American community and in turn is apart of our Diaspora


Layton Green, Holiday Heart, Meek Mill, J Cole, a poem called Famous

Mikalah Mack
14
 

H.G. Wells Time Machine- The symbolism of Machines

Machines are an important symbol in The Time Machine. The information in my collection is made up of 4 machines/modern technology of the past, and 4 machines/technology of the future. The information on the future is mostly about transportation, for example, future cars, planes, and travel in space. The information on artifacts of the past is about machines that were considered modern in new when they were invented. The Machines in the novel are in the Palace of Green Porcelain and they are falling apart, rusting, and old. It is hard to tell from what time periods they came from because the time traveler went so far into the future. The Machines in the museum could still be form far in the future from our point in time but in the past from where the time traveler is. They may also be from the past from our point in time. In the Time Machine, machines represent the hope the time traveler has that he might be able to go back in time. 

Caroline Fredey
11
 

Digital Collections Project

Masculinity in African Cultures

Joseph Washington
5
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer and Sackler Galleries
114
 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from Korea. Students will formulate questions about a Buddhist work of art from Korea using Project Zero's Layers Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with various interactives and digital resources provided.  

#AsiaTeachers
Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea


About the exhibition:

Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece
September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of Suwol Gwaneum bosal (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.

Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.

We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
11
 

H.G. Wells: The Time Machine

Just like the lever in the novel Time Machine by H.G. Wells, these objects mean more than just simple tools.

Ivy Kang
8
 

African American LGBTQ community

This collection will emphasis on the commonalities that queer community have faced and it's progression. People of color have been a very influential part of the queer community. With leaders such as Phill Wilson, Marsha P. Johnson, and Tarek Ali. 

LGBTQ Leadership is very important because it allows us to achieve goals as a community. Leaders are able to inspire other individuals to strive for greatness. They act as advocate for a community and promotes the strength and growth of it. When talking about educating people on the LGBTQ community we must include the factors and strives that our leaders have made, HIV/AIDS awareness, and our own mental growth as a community. 

DeAuntae Corry
10
409-432 of 6,073 Collections