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Found 423 Collections

 

Animal Adaptations: Tails

A collection focused on a variety of animal tails and their functions.
Jon Berg
8
 

Simple Machines

Wheel and axle, inclined Plane, screw, lever, pulley, wedge.

Assignment:

Can you identify which simple machine(s) each picture shows?

Can you think of other examples in that category?

Which simple machine is most important? Why? Defend your answer with 2-3 reasons.
Lauren Granger
16
 

Early Alphabet Books

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Annette Hibbert Nelson
13
 

Animal Adaptations: Beaks

A collection focused on a variety of bird beaks and their functions: including Sharp Beaks, Flat Beaks, Conical Beaks, Chisel Beaks, Probing Beaks, Filter Beaks, Curved Beaks and Fishing Beaks.
Jon Berg
15
 

Voyage of Discovery: Lewis & Clark explore Louisiana.

Images related to the Corps of Discovery. Most people think of the Lewis and Clark Expedition as one of geographic exploration. However, President Jefferson charged them to study ethnography, biology, zoology, meteorology, botany and geology. They were required to make detailed maps of their travels and keep a journal about their experiences. Sculptures, paintings and other forms of artwork have been included to illustrate the many interpretations of Lewis and Clark.
Arthur Glaser
38
 

Black Death: the Bubonic Plague during the Middle Ages.

The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history as Bubonic Plague spread across Asia and Europe eventually killing between 75 and 200 million people.
Linda Muller
11
 

"Water Matters" Online Conference Series: Archive and Illustration Summaries

This online conference series invites educators and students to take an active role in global environmental issues around water. Learn from experts in the field, share ideas, and collaborate with people around the world who, like you, are committed to solving environmental challenges. Includes illustration summaries and the archive of each session, with interdisciplinary connections to water issues . Original Airdates: Spring 2012
Ashley Naranjo
42
 

Climate Change Online Conference Series: Archive and Related Teaching Resources

This online conference series invites educators and students to explore Smithsonian research and collections related to the evidence, impact, and response to climate change. Smithsonian curators and researchers explore the evidence of climate change, as well as the impact of climate change on the environment, wildlife, biodiversity, and human populations. Smithsonian experts also lead discussions on how people are responding to the threats posed by climate change. Includes the archive of each session, with teacher-created suggested lessons that utilize Visual Thinking Strategies. Original Airdates: Fall 2009

Ashley Naranjo
25
 

Student Activity: Investigating Invasive Species

An invasive species is a plant or animal that has been introduced to an ecosystem and does great damage to its new home. In this activity, students will look at the impact of invasive species on marine ecosystems. Using a global database, students will identify the spread of invasive species. Students will go on to create a  public-service announcement to tell others what they can do to help solve the problem in their local water sources.

Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Tale of a Whale and Why It Can Be Told

Multi-step lesson in which students do the work of scientists who study the endangered North Atlantic right whale. They compare photos to identify an individual whale and use a record of sighting to track this whale’s movements along the eastern seaboard.
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
10
 

Prehistoric Climate Change and Why It Matters Today

In a lesson in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, students do the work of a team of paleontologists studying a time of rising carbon dioxide and rapid global warming during the Eocene epoch. By examining fossils of tree leaves, and then incorporating the findings into a mathematical formula, they are able to tell average annual temperatures 55 million years ago. Really!

Click the PDF icons to download the issue and additional materials.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
9
 

What's Your Problem? A Look at the Environment in Your Own Backyard

Students take on a local environmental challenge in the lesson plans of this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom. Before deciding on a problem to tackle, they try interviewing local folks about the state of the community's environment and how it has changed through the years.

Click the PDF icon to see the Smithsonian in Your Classroom. Then check out oral-history interviewing tips on the site of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife. Also included below is an audio presentation on deer life by Smithsonian scientist Bill McShea.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
4
 

The Universe: An Introduction

This issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom includes a lesson plan in which the class arranges pictures of heavenly bodies according to the students' best ideas of size, distance, and age. This active introduction to the cosmos can be a pre-assessment for a unit on space science. In a follow-up modeling exercise, relationships in space are brought down to a scale of two inches.

Click on the PDF icons to download the issue and ancillary materials.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
7
 

Botany and Art and Their Roles in Conservation

Lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom introduce students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators, specifically their race to make records of endangered plant species around the world. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of a Smithsonian artist. Also included here are additional resources on the topic: a one-hour webinar and a website.

Click the PDF icons to download the issue and lesson materials.


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
11
 

The Renaissance of Science

How can new discoveries lead to change? This Collection features images of men whose discoveries changed human knowledge and understanding of the world in which they lived.
Linda Muller
6
 

Senses Series - Touch

How do we experience the sense of touch? This collection explores the variety of human and animal touch experiences. From the characteristics of a variety of objects, to a video which examines the touch experience of tortoises and pandas... we all experience touch differently. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides touch experiments; an examination of pain and why it hurts, and the functionality of the body's largest organ—the skin. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from Tibetan monks' Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of touch differ from your own?

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
19
 

Senses Series - Smell

How do we experience the sense of smell? This collection explores the variety of human and animal smell experiences. Videos examine ants that use smell to communicate, orchid bee perfumery, and the unique smell adaptation of the maned wolf. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides the structure and function of the nose, as well as olfaction experiments. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from a Tibetan monastic Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of smell differ from your own?

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
9
 

Senses Series - Taste

How do we taste what we taste? This collection is about the kinds of tastes that the human tongue experiences. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the tongue and taste function. Included are experiments to try, as well as examples of the kinds of tastes: sweet, salty, sour, hot and bitter. The collection closes with a cross-cultural examination of tongue function and tastes from Tibetan monastics—who recognize thirty-six different tastes!

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
14
 

Senses Series - Sight in Humans and Animals

How do we see what we see? This collection is about seeing the world in unexpected ways through human innovations and animal adaptations. Meet a teen who invented a new way to see infrared, a visually impaired woman with a bionic implant, a shark whose eye is similar our own, a Giant Squid with the world's largest eyes, a mantis shrimp who sees many colors in all directions, and a nocturnal sweat bee who navigates the jungle in the dark. Learn about why human vision can only see a certain type of light within the electromagnetic spectrum. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the eye and brain function together, and experiments to try. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of seeing from a Tibetan monastic Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of sight differ from your own? 

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
15
 

Senses Series - Hearing

How do we hear what we hear? This collection is about hearing the world in unexpected ways through human perspectives of science and culture, and animal adaptations. Meet a shark whose entire body is an ear; zoo otters who play the keyboard; rabbits whose large ear adaptations provide self-defense; and the reasons for a sea lion's bark. Learn about the structure and function of human ears can only see a certain type of light within the electromagnetic spectrum. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the ear and hearing functions work, as well as a sound experiments to try. The collections closes with a cross-cultural examination of hearing and function from Tibetan Buddhist monastics.

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
10
 

Flashcard Activity: Tools and Innovation

This collection traces innovation in various types of tools over time.  Approach in small groups or as a classroom to have students explore the essential questions: What makes something innovative?  How do you define innovation? 

Supporting questions and activity implementation ideas are located under this collection's Information (i) button.  This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the resource tile). 

Keywords: invention, flash cards

Tess Porter
37
 

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer

The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers' bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join STEM in 30 as we investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and into the history books.

December 14, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
34
 

Mummy Science - Natural and Cultural Preserved Remains

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on the science of mummies. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of how mummies form, both naturally and culturally. Physical and forensic anthropologist Dr. David Hunt is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Key Terms: physical anthropology, archaeology, skeletal remains, mummification, burial practices, decomposition, culture

Key Concepts:

Skeletal analysis for age, sex, ancestry, and health

Cultural burial practices over time

Chemical process of mummification

Scientific benefits of studying mummies

Technology used by physical anthropologists

Smithsonian Science How
13
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
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