Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(151)
(323)
(428)
(383)
(446)
(12)
(267)
(231)
(104)
(199)
(63)
(52)

Found 474 Collections

 

No One Should Be Afraid of Big Beautiful Wolves

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Wolves. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about wolves, read articles about wolves and listen to two podcast episodes about wolves. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
41
 

Remnants from the exploration of space

Clothing, spacecraft, tools, and mementos to better understand the achievement of space exploration.  

David S. Ball
134
 

G is for Victory

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring gardens. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about gardening, learn about victory gardens, learn about seeds, and listen to a Peter Rabbit read aloud. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

All That Jazz: An Introduction

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about jazz, read articles about Jazz, and listen to the read aloud Rent Party Jazz. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

A Celebration of African Americans at NASA

The National Museum of African American History and Culture welcomes you to learn about African American STEM contributions at NASA. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) became an official government agency in 1958, born from its predecessor, the National Advisory Council for Aeronautics (NACA).

In 1961, NASA selected its first African American astronaut candidate by the name of Edward Dwight Jr. Although he never flew in space, his selection as an astronaut candidate was a public display to integrate the space agency. Until then, NASA only had white male astronauts flying even though African American scientists, mathematicians, and engineers had been working for the agency for more than a decade.

Finally in 1981, Guion Bluford became the first African American to fly in space. Since then African Americans have continued to fill positions at NASA and make their contributions in space, from behind a desk, and in the laboratory.

This Learning Lab celebrates these individuals, their bravery, their exploratory spirit, and their desires to express themselves fully through their commitment to space exploration.

This is a celebration of them all.


Keywords: NASA, NMAAHC, NASM,  Astronaut, African American, Scientist, Engineer, Mathematician, Technology, Space, Space Travel

National Museum of African American History and Culture
44
 

Marine Life & Conservation

Educational resources on marine life and conservation topics designed to help students learn about our oceans, marine life, and the importance of conservation. Includes early and middle childhood educational activity worksheets and minimal-prep homeschooling lesson plans 

Education = Conservation = Preservation

Ethan
13
 

Dance Dance Revolution

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring damce. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about dance, watch different dances around the world, and try some GoNoodle dances. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
34
 

Robot Inspiration

Check out these cool robots!  Some might be familiar or what you might expect a robot to look like... but some are quite unique!   Your challenge is to design yourself as a robot that is truly one of a kind! Imagine that you are on a journey to find other robot friends!   Use whatever art materials or found objects you have at home to create your robot and friends!  You can draw, paint, build, or even collage your robot.  Try to add a background setting to make it more interesting and help tell your story. 

Precious Crabtree
8
 

Access Series: People, Friends, and Family--Together and Alone

This topical collection of people—together in groups with friends or families (mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandmother, and grandfather); different genders, ages, and ethnicities, and "selfies"—was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
128
 

Together and Alone

This topical collection of people—together in groups with friends or families (mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandmother, and grandfather); different genders, ages, and ethnicities, and "selfies"—was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Use the visible thinking routine.

LYDIA NISHWITZ
128
 

Access Series: Making Music and Sonic Self-Portraits

This inspiration collection of musical people and music instruments was used for a music-making activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students used GarageBand software to create sonic self-portraits. Prior to the activity, teens were asked about their favorite genres of music, including jazz, blues, classical, rock, pop, rap, and R&B. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program, #SmithsonianMusic

Tracie Spinale
59
 

Access Series: Flying Things

This topical collection of airplanes, hot air balloons, space craft, and other things that fly, was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials). It was used as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program--as pre-museum visit preparation to artifacts that would be found at an airplane museum. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could fly anywhere, where would you go and what would you do?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, all access digital arts program

Tracie Spinale
93
 

Well Done, Sister Suffragette!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring women's suffrage. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about women's suffrage as well as listen to the song "Sister Suffragette" from Mary Poppins. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

Four Eyes are Better Than One

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our eyes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about our eyes as well as learn about animal vision. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Our Big Blue World

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our Oceans. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about ocean life as well as videos to learn about scientists studying coral reefs. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
41
 

Spanish-American War

This collection highlights artifacts and secondary sources to help students explore the history of the Spanish-American War. Specific topics referenced in this collection include the explosion of US Maine and political and military figures.

Time Period: April 21, 1898 - August 13, 1898 (approx. 5 months)

National Museum of American History
24
 

World War I

This collection highlights artifacts and secondary sources to help students explore the history of World War I. Specific topics referenced in this collection include trench warfare, women's contributions to the war effort and aid efforts.

Time Period: July 28, 1914 - November 11, 1918

National Museum of American History
31
 

Sun in Art and Science

The Sun is the center of our Solar System and is central to people's lives around the world.  This collection includes art that depicts the Sun and an exploration of how people think about the Sun and use the Sun in their daily lives.

Ann Caspari
68
 

The Iñupiaq People and Their Culture

By Beverly Faye Hugo (Iñupiaq), 2009

(This is shortened version of a longer essay from the Smithsonian book Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska.)

Sea, Land, Rivers

There’s ice and snow, the ocean and darkness – darkness in the winter and twenty-four hours of daylight in the summer. Barrow was originally called Utqiaġvik (meaning, “the place where ukpik, the snowy owl, nests”). That’s where my people, the Iñupiat, have survived and lived, and I am doing as they have done. On the Arctic coast you can see vast distances in all directions, out over the ocean and across the land. The country is very flat, with thousands of ponds and lakes, stretching all the way to the Brooks Range in the south. It is often windy, and there are no natural windbreaks, no trees, only shrubs. Beautiful flowers grow during the brief summer season. The ocean is our garden, where we hunt the sea mammals that sustain us. Throughout the year some seasonal activity is going on. We are whaling in the spring and fall, when the bowheads migrate past Barrow, going out for seals and walrus, fishing, or hunting on the land for caribou, geese, and ducks.

Whaling crews are made up of family members and relatives, and everyone takes part. The spring is an exciting time when the whole community is focused on the whales, hoping to catch one. The number we are permitted to take each year is set by the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission and the International Whaling Commission. Whaling is not for the faint of heart. It can be dangerous and takes an incredible amount of effort – getting ready, waiting for the whales, striking and pulling and towing them. But the men go out and do it because they want to feed the community. Everyone has to work hard throughout the whaling season. People who aren’t able to go out on the ice help in other ways, such as buying supplies and gas or preparing food. You have to make clothing for them; they need warm parkas, boots, and snow pants.

We believe that a whale gives itself to a captain and crew who are worthy people, who have integrity – that is the gift of the whale. Caring for whales, even after you’ve caught them, is important. After a whale is caught and divided up, everyone can glean meat from the bones. Each gets his share, even those who don’t belong to a crew. No one is left out.

We are really noticing the effects of global warming. The shorefast ice is much thinner in spring than it used to be, and in a strong wind it will sometimes break away. If you are out on the ice, you have to be extremely conscious of changes in the wind and current so that you will not be carried off on a broken floe. We are concerned as well about the effects of offshore drilling and seismic testing by the oil companies. They try to work with the community to avoid problems, but those activities could frighten the whales and be detrimental to hunting.

 

Community and Family

Iñupiaq residents of Barrow, Wales, Point Hope, Wainwright, and other coastal communities, are the Taġiuqmiut, “people of the salt.” People who live in the interior are the Nunamiut, “people of the land.” The Nunamiut used to be nomadic, moving from camp to camp with their dog teams, hunting and fishing to take care of their families. They packed light and lived in skin tents, tracking the caribou and mountain sheep. My husband, Patrick Hugo, was one of them. For the first six years of his life his family traveled like that, but when the government built a school at Anaktuvuk Pass in 1959 they settled there.

My parents, Charlie and Mary Edwardson, were my foremost educators. They taught me my life skills and language. When I came to awareness as a young child, all the people who took care of me spoke Iñupiaq, so that was my first language. Our father would trap and hunt. We never went hungry and had the best furs for our parkas. Our mother was a fine seamstress, and we learned to sew by helping her. My mother and grandmother taught us to how to care for a family and to do things in a spirit of cooperation and harmony.

I was a child during the Bureau of Indian Affairs era, when we were punished for speaking Iñupiaq in school. My first day in class was the saddest one of my young life. I had to learn English, and that was important, but my own language is something that I value dearly and have always guarded. It is a gift from my parents and ancestors, and I want to pass it on to my children and grandchildren and anyone who wants to learn.

 

Ceremony and Celebration

Nalukataq (blanket toss) is a time of celebration when spring whaling has been successful. It is a kind of all-day picnic. People visit with friends and family at the windbreaks that the crews set up by tipping the whale boats onto their sides. At noon they serve niġliq (goose) soup, dinner rolls, and tea. At around 3:00 P.M. we have mikigaq, made of fermented whale meat, tongue, and skin. At 5:00 they serve frozen maktak (whale skin and blubber) and quaq (raw frozen fish). It’s wonderful to enjoy these foods, to talk, and catch up with everyone at the end of the busy whaling season.

Kivgik, the Messenger Feast, was held in the qargi (ceremonial house). The umialgich (whaling captains) in one community sent messengers to the leaders of another, inviting them and their families to come for days of feasting, dances, and gift giving. They exchanged great quantities of valuable things – piles of furs, sealskins filled with oil, weapons, boats, and sleds. That took place until the early years of the twentieth century, when Presbyterian missionaries suppressed our traditional ceremonies, and many of the communal qargich in the villages were closed down.

In 1988, Mayor George Ahmaogak Sr. thought it was important to revitalize some of the traditions from before the Christian era, and Kivgik was started again. Today it is held in the high school gymnasium. People come to Barrow from many different communities to take part in the dancing and maġgalak, the exchange of gifts. You give presents to people who may have helped you or to those whom you want to honor.  Kivgiq brings us together as one people, just as it did in the time of our ancestors.

Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Alaska Native, Indigenous, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska, whale, whaling, human geography

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
20
 

I Speak for the Trees!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring trees. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a PBS video about trees as well as learn about how animals interact with trees. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
 

National Parks Belong to Everyone

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our National Parks. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about the parks as well as listen to the sounds recorded at the parks. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
28
 

Pandemics: a Comparison

World History supplemental unit resources for comparison of two global pandemics. Students choose two pandemics. Choose a tact of analysis through the lens of government intervention, or economic, or impact of healthcare industry. 

Ann Sperske
12
 

Waste Not, Want Not

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring reducing, reusing, and recycling. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about upcycling and fix it clinics as well as learn about how people can repurpose waste. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
38
 

Cleveland and Maternal Health

Cleveland has a history...

This collection of artifacts marks the intersection between NMAH Medicine and Science collections and the history of Cleveland pertaining to women and healthcare. Cleveland organizations, including the Maternal Health Association, Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio, and The Brush Foundation, played pivotal roles in advancing women's access to care. The Supreme Court Cases Loving v. VA and Cleveland Board of Education vs Lafleur  originated in Cleveland's Federal Court.  Western Reserve Historical Society and the Dittrick Center for Medical History are important local resources for this history.

Kimberly Lenahan
9
385-408 of 474 Collections