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Found 39,370 Resources

Ulothrix subtilissima Rabenh.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Ulva aetherea Poir.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Ulva bullata Poir.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Ulva papyracea Schleicher

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Ulva vesiciformis Delarbre

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Universal Magnetometer with Dip Circle

National Museum of American History
This instrument is marked "D.T.M. C.I.W. N° 19." Designed and built by the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1912, it incorporates an astronomical telescope and magnetometer for the determination of magnetic declination and horizontal intensity, and a dip circle with a Lloyd-Creak attachment for the determination of inclination and intensity. It is relatively light and easy to manipulate. It was used for a few years and then set aside when the universal magnetometer with earth inductor came into use. This magnetometer was probably transferred to the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey after the Carnegie Institution closed its geomagnetic program. The U.S. Geological Survey acquired it in 1973, when it took over the geomagnetic program of the federal government, and transferred it to the Smithsonian in 1982. Ref: J. A. Fleming, "Two New Types of Magnetometers Made by the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington," Terrestrial Magnetism 16 (1911): 1-12. Carnegie Institution of Washington, Land Magnetic Observations, 1911-1913 (Washington, D.C., 1915), pp. 7-8.

Universal Magnetometer with Dip Circle

National Museum of American History
This instrument, inscribed "D.T.M. C.I.W. No 21," was designed and built by the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington in 1912. It incorporates an astronomical telescope and magnetometer for the determination of magnetic declination and horizontal intensity, and a dip circle with a Lloyd-Creak attachment for the determination of inclination and intensity. It is relatively light and easy to manipulate. It was used for a few years and then set aside when the universal magnetometer with earth inductor came into use. This instrument ended up in the hands of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, and that agency transferred it to the Smithsonian in 1959. Ref: J. A. Fleming, "Two New Types of Magnetometers Made by the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington," Terrestrial Magnetism 16 (1911): 1-12. Carnegie Institution of Washington. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. Land Magnetic Observations, 1911-1913 (Washington, D.C., 1915), pp. 7-9.

Universal Magnetometer with Earth Inductor

National Museum of American History
This instrument is marked "DEPARTMENT OF TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM Carnegie Institution of Washington E.I. - M No 26." It was designed and produced by the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Unlike the Carnegie's original universal magnetometer, this one is equipped with an earth inductor to determine dip. It was completed in 1914, compared with standard magnetic instruments at the Kew and Greenwich observatories in England, and at the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey observatory at Cheltenham, Md., and used in many locations around the world. Ref: J. A. Fleming and J. A. Widner, "Description of the C.I.W. Combined Magnetometer and Earth Inductor," Terrestrial Magnetism 18 (1913): 105-110. Carnegie Institution of Washington. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. Land Magnetic Observations, 1911-1913 (Washington, D.C., 1915), pp. 9-12.

Universal Magnetometer with Earth Inductor

National Museum of American History
This instrument was designed and produced by the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Unlike the Carnegie's original universal magnetometer, this one is equipped with an earth inductor to determine dip. It is marked "DEPARTMENT TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM Carnegie Institution of Washington E.I. - M. No. 28." It was completed in 1914 and used in many locations around the world. The U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey used it in South and Central America in the early 1940s. The U.S. Geological Survey acquired it in 1973, when that agency took charge of the federal program in geomagnetism, and transferred it to the Smithsonian in 1982. Ref: J. A. Fleming and J. A. Widner, "Description of the C.I.W. Combined Magnetometer and Earth Inductor," Terrestrial Magnetism 18 (1913): 105-110. Carnegie Institution of Washington. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. Land Magnetic Observations, 1911-1913 (Washington, D.C., 1915), pp. 9-12. U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Magnetic Observations in the American Republics 1941-44 (Washington, D.C., 1946), p. 16.

Ursus (Euarctos) vitabilis Gidley, 1913

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

Ursus amercanus

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

Ursus americanus Grady

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

Ursus americanus Grady

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

Ursus procerus Miller

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

Usnea scabrata Nyl.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Utricularia calycifida Benj.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Utricularia pubescens Sm.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Utricularia subulata L.

NMNH - Botany Dept.
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