Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(162)
(261)
(350)
(347)
(398)
(2)
(262)
(147)
(67)
(185)
(72)
(69)

Found 423 Collections

 

Αλφαβητάρια

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Met Kous
13
 

Computers

Testing out Learning Lab features #ISTE2016
Matthew Lin
1
 

Historical Hawaii

#iste2016
Laurel Michelle Galway
5
 

Space Food

Curated on an iPhone during the presentation at ISTE2016
Dave Johnson
5
 

Breakfast in space

Space Breakfast
Bre Griego
6
 

Animal Adaptations: Beaks

A collection focused on a variety of bird beaks and their functions: including Sharp Beaks, Flat Beaks, Conical Beaks, Chisel Beaks, Probing Beaks, Filter Beaks, Curved Beaks and Fishing Beaks.#ISTE2016
Cally Flickinger
17
 

Access Series: Flying Things

This topical collection of airplanes, hot air balloons, space craft, and other things that fly, was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials). It was used as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program--as pre-museum visit preparation to artifacts that would be found at an airplane museum. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could fly anywhere, where would you go and what would you do?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, all access digital arts program

Tracie Spinale
100
 

Access Series: Animals - Domestic and Wild!

This topical collection of artworks is all about animals—domestic pets, and wild, untamed beasts. Horses, elephants, dinosaurs, zebras, pandas...cats, hogs, frogs, dogs, lions, tigers, and bears; fish and fowl, monkeys that howl - you'll find all of them here. This collections was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials), and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "Which animals have you seen before and where did you see them? If you could have any one of these animals as a pet, which would you choose and why?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.


Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
278
 

Diversity in Plants and Animals

Learn about the diversity of plants and animals in different habitats.
SmithsonianScienceAshley
22
 

Good Thinking!

This original web series is designed to support K-12 science educators through targeted short-format videos that explore common student ideas and misconceptions about a range of science topics such as energy, chemical reactions, and natural selection, as well as pedagogical subjects like student motivation and the myth of left and right-brained people.
SmithsonianScienceAshley
16
 

Reading Companion: Science of Hot-Air Balloons

This collection is a reading companion to the Cricket article "Hang on, Dolly!" [April 2016]. This article tells the story of Dolly Shepherd, an adventure-loving aerobat who parachuted from high-flying hot-air balloons in the early twentieth century. After learning about her story, explore the science of hot-air balloons with STEM in 30, a fast-paced webcast targeted towards students. Also includes lithographs depicting other female balloonists.
Michelle Smith
5
 

Reading Companion: Pandas

This collection is a reading companion to two articles included here as PDFs - "A Symbol of Peace: The Giant Panda" [Faces; May 2007], "Something New at the Zoo" [Ask; July 2015], and "Panda Handstands Get High Marks" [Ask; March 2005].

Several videos feature panda behavior and habitat. The TED talk by a Smithsonian scientist raises questions about our love affair with pandas.

Together the resources offer several options for comparing and contrasting informational text with science content.
Michelle Smith
17
 

Reading Companion: Robots

This collection is a reading companion to two articles - "Robot Zoo" [Ask; Nov 2011] and "Me, Myself, and My Android Twin" [Muse; Nov 2012]. Students are asked to investigate these articles, alongside other objects, videos, and articles, to examine what issues robot designers are attempting to address with their inventions, and how they are trying to address them. At the end of the activity, students will be asked to write a paragraph or more explaining which inventions they think are the most important and why, citing resources in this collection as evidence.
Tess Porter
22
 

Apollo 11 Crew

This topical collection details the human stories of the Apollo XI mission by giving details on the lives of each crew member; it includes pictures and an external link. There is a list of the resources in each section at the beginning of that section.
Goal: Students will understand the lives of the Apollo XI crew members and be able to assess how their lives as people influenced their accomplishments as astronauts.
Tags: moon, moon landing, Apollo 11, Apollo XI, Armstrong, Aldrin, Collins, space, space race, space travel, rocket

Inspired by the Harvard Project Zero thinking strategy unveiling stories
Jade Lintott
24
 

Glass: One of America's First Industries

America's first colony, Jamestown, initiated glass production with the hope that it would be an important product in the mercantile trade with the mother country. Although, the production of glass was successful, the quality did not measure up against that of British producers and the glass business soon waned in Jamestown. At the end of the eighteenth century, Pittsburgh found that it had all of the raw materials to make high quality glass and imported skill glass blowers from England to begin full production. So glass preceded the production of steel and became Pittsburgh's first large scale industry.
Arthur Glaser
40
 

Moon Rocks

Twelve men have walked on the Moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we've been able to learn about the Moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We have also found lunar meteorites here on Earth—meteorites produced by impacts hitting the Moon.

May 25, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
31
 

How Things Fly

A lesson plan introduces students to the four elements of flight - drag, lift, thrust, and weight - through fun-filled experiments. Students "fly" for short periods and then evaluate factors that might either increase or decrease their "flight" duration.

Click the PDF icon to download the issue.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
12
 

Structure & Function

Learn how animals have external structures that function to support survival and behavior.

SmithsonianScienceAshley
12
 

Engineering Mars Spacecraft

Students determine which real spacecraft matches specific engineering requirements.
National Air and Space Museum Education
11
 

Runaway in an Unknown Land: The Underground Railroad in Western Pennsylvania

Prior to the Civil War, enslaved people had little chance of securing their freedom. There were rare cases of freedom being purchased by the enslaved individual or by some benefactor. Even rarer was the granting of freedom papers by the master. For those who desired to taste freedom, the choice of running was often the only viable choice. Runaways faced incredible dangers en route including the possibility of capture.
Arthur Glaser
29
 

The Body in Space

This collection will help students explore the intersection of space, the life sciences, and technology as they discover how the body changes in space and the equipment and experiments that have helped us learn how to counteract the problems caused.
National Air and Space Museum Education
10
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with an Artwork

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Once you have examined the artwork and answered the questions, view an archived webinar with a museum educator to compare your interpretation. How does viewing the artwork with the museum label change your interpretation? How did what you noticed in the artwork compare with what the educators shared?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.

#visiblethinking

Ashley Naranjo
3
 

Helicopters the science of vertical flight

The idea of vertical flight has been around for a long time. As early as 400 BC Chinese kids were playing with bamboo flying toys. In the 1480s Leonardo da Vinci made the first recorded advancement in vertical flight when he sketched his aerial screw. We have come a long way since then! This episode of STEM in 30 will explore helicopters: their design, how they work, and the functions they play in our society.

May 11, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
22
 

Objects of History

The dictionary defines an object as, "a thing you can see and touch: something that makes you feel a specific emotion." This is a collection of objects that represent moments throughout history. What event is behind each object? Who does the object belong to? Why is the object significant?

Suggested Activity: Teachers can copy and edit this collection, then add or remove specific resources. Build out this collection to ensure that it has enough resources so your students can work in pairs or small groups to analyze 2-3 sources.
Have student pairs/groups place each resource in its proper time and place then have the entire class work together to place all resources on a timeline. As each student pairs/groups place their resources on to the timeline, have them explain what they learned about each resource to the whole class.
Linda Muller
48
337-360 of 423 Collections