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Found 5,100,795 Resources

Bow-Drill Mixer

National Museum of American History

Wooden Spatula

National Museum of American History

mortar and pestle

National Museum of American History

tankard

National Museum of American History

goblet, portable

National Museum of American History

Close Stool Pan

National Museum of American History
Tapered cylindrical, handleless pot with horizontal, single-reeded rim and rounded bottom on an applied, concave foot ring; made to be placed in a commode chair or stool. Plain body. Several letters and numbers lightly scratched into bottom underside. No marks apparent.

Chamber Pot

National Museum of American History
Wide-mouthed, side-handled, bulbous pot with narrow, everted rim and slightly rounded bottom on an applied, concave foot ring or base. Double, reverse C-scroll strap handle has rounded thumbrest and slightly flared lower terminal with oval attachment. Horizontal seam at midbody, visible inside bowl. No marks apparent.

Bedpan

National Museum of American History
Flattened circular container with rounded ring-like top around a wide opening and removable, horizontal, scored baluster handle with tiny finial and spool-shaped cap that screws off threaded collar at side for easy cleaning (contents can be poured out); flat bottom, no foot ring. Horizontal seam at midbody. Bottom underside struck twice with circular Poseidon or Neptune touchmark of Edgar & Son, placed opposite the secondary mark of a crowned "X" above "EDGAR / & SON" and three pseudo hallmarks (fourth possibly gone): a right-facing lion (or other animal) passant, imperial crown, and "E&C\o", all in serrated surrounds.

Last

National Museum of American History

stick, walking

National Museum of American History

Charles William Eliot

National Portrait Gallery

Ethel Barrymore

National Portrait Gallery

Augustus Addison Gould

National Portrait Gallery

John Jay McCloy

National Portrait Gallery

Joseph Herman Hirshhorn

National Portrait Gallery

Thomas Stone

National Portrait Gallery

Ulysses Simpson Grant

Catalog of American Portraits

Edgar Lee Masters

National Portrait Gallery

John La Hande

National Portrait Gallery

Thomas Edmund Dewey

National Portrait Gallery

Blackfoot in Robe

Catalog of American Portraits

Hannibal Hamlin

National Portrait Gallery

John Ross

National Portrait Gallery

Ralph Steiner Self-Portrait

National Portrait Gallery
Although the photographer and filmmaker Ralph Steiner studied pictorialist photography at the Clarence White School, he shifted toward modernism after encountering Paul Strand and his photography around 1927. Strand’s work caused Steiner to realize that he “was not yet a photographer.” To perfect his technique, Steiner bought an 8 x 10 large-format camera and spent three months working intensively at Yaddo, an artist’s retreat near Saratoga Springs, New York. That summer he made many photographs of billboards, and shortly there- after, he created this self-portrait. The composition features an enormous billboard, with one image partially pulled away to reveal another, and Steiner posing at the bottom of the frame, cradling his camera like a heavy infant as he stares out at the viewer. Steiner’s acerbic wit, so evident in his writing, and often in his photographs, is clear in the concep- tion of this image, with its visual complexity.

Aunque el fotógrafo y cineasta Ralph Steiner estudió fotografía pictorialista en la Clarence White School, dio un giro hacia el modernismo después de descu- brir, cerca de 1927, la obra de Paul Strand, que le hizo reconocer que “todavía no era un fotógrafo”. Para perfeccionar su técnica, Steiner compró una cámara de gran formato 8 x 10 y pasó tres meses trabajando intensamente en Yaddo, una colonia de artistas cerca de Saratoga Springs, Nueva York. Ese verano tomó muchas fotografías de vallas publici- tarias y poco después hizo este autorretrato. La composición muestra una enorme valla publicitaria donde una imagen arrancada a la mitad revela parcialmente otra, y Steiner posa en la parte inferior del encuadre con la cámara en brazos, como si fuera un bebé muy pesado, mirando al observador. El humor cáustico de Steiner, tan evidente en sus escritos y a menudo en sus fotos, es patente en el concepto de esta imagen y su complejidad visual.
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