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Found 395 Collections

 

Taking the fast lane to orbit: The technology of rockets and racecars

Many of the technologies used in NASCAR are the same as those used in space travel, and many of the forces that keep a plane in the air also keep a racecar on the road. Join us as we broadcast STEM in 30 live from the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, North Carolina and look at the crossover between these forces and technologies.

February 22, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
19
 

The Biology of Long Term Spaceflight

Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react to being beyond Earth's atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain, and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars. Join STEM in 30 as we explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

January 25, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Moon Rocks

Twelve men have walked on the Moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we've been able to learn about the Moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We have also found lunar meteorites here on Earth—meteorites produced by impacts hitting the Moon.

May 25, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
31
 

Helicopters the science of vertical flight

The idea of vertical flight has been around for a long time. As early as 400 BC Chinese kids were playing with bamboo flying toys. In the 1480s Leonardo da Vinci made the first recorded advancement in vertical flight when he sketched his aerial screw. We have come a long way since then! This episode of STEM in 30 will explore helicopters: their design, how they work, and the functions they play in our society.

May 11, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
22
 

WWI: How History Shaped Technology

98 years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. The Wright brothers had only taken to the sky 14 years before, but airplanes still played a vital role in the war effort. Because of the events of WWI, airplane technology developed at an incredible rate. This fast-paced webcast will look at how airplanes changed in this short timeframe, how other technology advanced, and how airplanes were used throughout WWI.

April 8, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Earth Day: A View from Above

The people of Earth didn't see a photo of our planet until the late 1960s. Photos of Earth changed the way we think about our planet. This fast-paced webcast will look at the beginnings of Earth Day and how a better understanding of our place in the universe has evolved through photographic scientific discoveries.

April 22, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Living and Working in Space

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go into space? How about living and working in there? In this program we will explore those questions as well as the benefits and challenges of living and working in space.

May 20, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Time and Navigation

If you want to know where you are, you need a good clock. For centuries sailors have used clocks to locate where they are out at sea. Today we use synchronized clocks and orbiting satellites for location. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll take a look at the challenges of navigating at sea, in the sky, and even in space.

August 26, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Asteroid Redirect Mission

In orbit around the Sun are thousands of asteroids ranging in size from grains of sand to miles across. NASA is planning a mission to capture a piece of an asteroid to be studied by NASA scientists and astronauts. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will learn about asteroids, what we can learn from capturing one, and the technology needed to accomplish such a mission.

September 23, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Mars

A current elementary or middle school student will most likely be the first human to step foot on Mars. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will investigate the plans to send humans to Mars and the ongoing research into water and the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

October 21, 2015


This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
28
 

Milestones of Flight: The Lindberghs

Charles Lindbergh is probably best known for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. However, Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, also reached other milestones in aviation. In 1929 they purchased a Lockheed Sirius airplane and flew it to Asia, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the north. During a trip through Greenland, a native boy gave the Sirius its nickname: Tingmissartoq, meaning "one who flies like a big bird." This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the Lindberghs' aviation-related accomplishments.

January 27, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

WWII and Tuskegee Airmen

Before 1941, there weren't any African American pilots in the United States armed forces. The Tuskegee Airmen changed that. With the United States' entry into World War II imminent, the U.S. Army Air Corps (the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force) decided to offer training to African Americans as pilots and mechanics. Called the Tuskegee Airmen because they trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American military. This episode of STEM in 30 will look at the role African Americans played during the war and how World War II changed aviation history

February 24, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Lighter, Stronger, Better: Composites

What makes the Boeing 787 Dreamliner so dreamy? Composites. These engineered materials allow aircraft to be lighter and stronger. Explore composites in this fast-paced webcast: learn what they are, how they are made and how they are used in the aerospace industry.

January 28, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Sorting through astronomical nebulae.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, astronomers using basic telescopes recorded the existence of an amazing collection of nebulae. These appeared as different types of fuzzy gray material. At that time, technology did not exist to separate the nebulae into different categories. This mini lab has selected representative types of each nebulae and the characteristics of each.

Arthur Glaser
8
 

Charles Messier: Comet Ferret

Charles Messier was an eighteenth century astronomer whose specialty was searching for comets. He observed at an observatory atop the Hotel Cluny which was financed by the French Navy.

Arthur Glaser
24
 

E-Textiles

This teaching collection gives an introduction to e-textiles, which incorporates sewing with circuitry. Students will first learn the basics LED circuitry, then create their very own wearable tech. Extension activities include creating paper circuits with magnetic copper tape and magnetic "throwies".



This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
13
 

Hidden Figures: Female Computers

Before computers were objects, they were people - and primarily female. The 1930s and 1940s was an explosive time for programming, flight, and space exploration - and women were making a unique and powerful contribution that was generally obscured in the official record.

Washington International School #wis

Jaime Chao Mignano
19
 

"Think Different": Steve Jobs

What does it mean to be influenced by the world around you? This collection looks at the technical innovations, design influences (Japanese Zen Buddhist, Italian, Bauhaus); location influences (Yosemite, Silicon Valley); and cultural and musical influences (Bob Dylan, Edwin Land) which inspired Steve Jobs to "think different" and create digital products which changed the world.

Keywords: inventor, biography, technology, innovation

Tracie Spinale
46
 

Ciphers and Codes

Throughout all of history, ciphers and secret codes were devised to keep intelligence from falling into the wrong hands. From the WWII German "Enigma" machine to America's Cherokee Code Talkers, people used ciphers and codes to safeguard secrets. One of my favorite mysterious artworks is the sculpture Antipodes, outside of the Hirshhorn Museum. No one knows what it means, and its companion piece Kryptos sits outside at Langley. I was inspired to create this collection because a parent wrote to us asking what kinds of spy or secret code summer camps were available at the Smithsonian. Before passing them along to the International Spy Museum, I wondered what kind of topical collection I could create in SLL. It turns out, there's a lot of material culture associated with codes and coding, so these are some of my favorite objects and videos in our Smithsonian collections.

Tracie Spinale
25
 

Human Evolution - Early Human Diets

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on the significance diet for human evolution. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of the evidence for early meat-eating in humans. Anthropologist Dr. Briana Pobiner is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

Key Terms: paleoanthropology, fossil, archaeology, human evolution, extinction, taxonomy, phylogeny

Key Concepts:

- What it means to be human

- Diet and culture of early humans

- Interpreting the family tree of humans

- Factors shaping human evolution

- Technology used by paleoanthropologists

Smithsonian Science How
13
 

Astrogeology- Meteorites and Spacecraft Missions

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on meteorites and related spacecraft missions. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of meteorites as sources of information about our solar system. Geologist Dr. Tim McCoy is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

Key Terms: geology, meteorites, asteroids, minerals, space missions, orbit, solar system history

Key Concepts:

- Evidence from meteorites about Earth's formation

- Characteristics of meteorites, meteors, asteroids

- Mineral origins of the universe

- Importance of space missions for astronomy

- Technology used by meteoriticists

Smithsonian Science How
13
 

Mummy Science - Natural and Cultural Preserved Remains

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on the science of mummies. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of how mummies form, both naturally and culturally. Physical and forensic anthropologist Dr. David Hunt is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Key Terms: physical anthropology, archaeology, skeletal remains, mummification, burial practices, decomposition, culture

Key Concepts:

Skeletal analysis for age, sex, ancestry, and health

Cultural burial practices over time

Chemical process of mummification

Scientific benefits of studying mummies

Technology used by physical anthropologists

Smithsonian Science How
13
 

What makes an astronomer?

Compare and Contrast the careers of Neil deGrasse Tyson and Neil Armstrong.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

Tags: #NPGteach; portrait; National Portrait Gallery
Sheri Fisher
8
 

Animal Adaptations: Beaks

A collection focused on a variety of bird beaks and their functions: including Sharp Beaks, Flat Beaks, Conical Beaks, Chisel Beaks, Probing Beaks, Filter Beaks, Curved Beaks and Fishing Beaks.#ISTE2016
Cally Flickinger
17
313-336 of 395 Collections