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Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume I, Brief biography, positions held, Loubat Prizes, medals, etc., societies and clubs, bibliography

Smithsonian Libraries
Devised title.

Binder's title: Random records.

Typewritten manuscript.

Also available online.

Related materials can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives RU007084, William Henry Holmes Papers, 1870-1931.

William Henry Holmes (1846-1933) was an anthropologist, archaeologist, artist, and geologist, who spent much of his career affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution. He studied art under Theodore Kauffman, and went on to work as a scientific illustrator with Smithsonian staff. In 1872, he was appointed artist-topographer to the United States survey of the territories under Ferdinand V. Hayden, and in 1874 was appointed assistant geologist. He went on to work with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE), until returning to the Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum (USNM). Holmes eventually became head curator of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology and Director of the National Gallery of Art.

AAPGRB copy also available on microfilm: MFM 1200 AAPGMAIN.

Elecresource

This is one of sixteen volumes compiled by William Henry Holmes in 1931 or 1932 to document his life and work. The volume contains original correspondences, documents, ephemera, watercolors, and photographs throughout. It is divided into six sections. The first describes the content of the 20 volumes and biography. The second section provides an overview of positions held including those at the U.S. Geological Survey and Smithsonian, as well as trips abroad. The positions are documented with original correspondence and official documents. The third section describes appointments, memberships and awards. Section five includes various types of societies and clubs to which he belonged, including scientific and artistic. The last sections contains a bibliography.

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-31OP 7/24/1978 (12:45pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-2 monk playing black and gilded (horn); 3-4 young monk playing drum with two drumsticks; 6-8 aisle and line of monke in (main prayer room) , two playing kangling and one in background playing (cymbals) 9-12 two monks sitting, one with is hands in his lap and one playing drum with two drumsticks;13 boy monk serving older monk in grey blanket besdie a wooden column; 15 older monk makin g hand gestures with red and gold pot on table infront of him; 16 two monks, on in red with yellow boarder, other kneeling on floor; 17 older monk in red holding hand and part of robe infront of him; 18 older monk inred kneeling with head to floor inprayer; 19-20 older monk returning to throng in center of dukang; 21 Steve Schecter talking to Rado, steve holding film camera; 22 line of monks sititng on center aidle of dukan being served tea by boy monk; 23 two older monks in corner by painted wall being served tea by boy monk; 24-35 monk in throne in dukang chanting with wyes clsoied with buddha statue behind him; 36-37 older monk sitting

Roxie Laybourne and Doug Deedrick with Microscope

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Doug Deedrick (left) and Roxie Laybourne (right) behind a counter in the Bird Division of the National Museum of Natural History. Roxie is looking through a microscope of a feather which she is manipulating with forceps. Doug Deedrick leans forward to look at the slide on the microscope.

An essay on the natural history of Guiana, in South America : containing a description of many curious productions in the animal and vegetable systems of that country : together with an account of the religion, manners, and customs of several tribes of its Indian inhabitants : interspersed with a variety of literary and medical observations : in several letters / from a gentleman of the medical faculty during his residence in that country

Smithsonian Libraries
Signatures: [A]⁴ B-2C⁸ 2D⁴.

Engraved frontispiece signed: M. Park delin.

Dedication signed (p. 3, 1st paging group): Edward Bancroft.

Booksellers' advertisements: leaves 2D3-2D4.

Sabin 3106

ESTC (RLIN) T78909

Also available online.

SCNHRB has three copies.

SCNHRB c. 1 (39088013481866) stamped on t.p.: Library of Congress Smithsonian Deposit Apr 23 1881 [ms. acc. no.] 109576.

SCNHRB c. 1 bound in green pebbled sheepskin, title in gilt on spine (at foot of spine: National Museum), marbled edges and endpapers.

SCNHRB c. 2 (39088013481908) has bookplate: Division of Physical Anthropology, U.S. National Museum. The Hrdlička Library.

SCNHRB c. 2 has ink ms. initials on t.p.: JV.

SCNHRB c. 2 bound in light brown calf, title in gilt on spine (leaves encased).

SCNHRB c. 3 (39088013481940) inscribed in ink on front free endpaper: A. Wetmore.

SCNHRB c. 3 has a few pencilled ms. notes.

SCNHRB c. 3 has frontispiece bound following p. 214.

SCNHRB c. 3 stamped on t.p.: Smithsonian Libraries Aug 04 1986 [and] withdrawn.

SCNHRB c. 3 bound in light brown cloth, title in gilt on spine.

Elecresource

Hermogenes Cayo 1970

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

Supplementary materials: audio tapes, still photographs, production files, correspondence, promotional materials and press clippings.

Archives also holds English language version released under the title Imaginero.

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research supported processing and the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Smithsonian Latino Center supported preservation of the Jorge Preloran Film Collection.

Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee

Donated by Jorge Preloran in 2007.

Edited film is an ethnobiography of Hermogenes Cayo, a religious image maker in the high Andean plateau of Argentina. The film portrays Hermogenes, his wife Aurelia Kilpe, and their children in their Andean lifestyle, as well as Hermogenes' passion for painting, carving, building, and his devotion to the virgin Mary. The film tells the story of how Hermogenes became an image maker and devotee to the virgin, thus capturing a lifestyle and philosophy rapidly disappearing. Hermogenes, if not the last, is one of the last image makers of his kind. His effigies, carved out of cactus root, are intricate and beautiful. The film includes Hermogenes reminisces, which are his narrations accompanied by old photographs. The audio track was made separately from the filming, so all of Hermogenes' or Aurelia's narrations overlay the footage. All narration is translated by the voice of Preloran, but the actual voices are clearly audible. The film does not follow a clear narrative structure, transitioning between themes and revisiting earlier themes later. In this way the film weaves a portrait of Hermogenes Cayo, the craft of image making, an indigenous Catholicism, marriage as well as portraying the lifestyle of a solitary Andean family braving the harsh conditions of the Andes. The relationship between individual and culture, as well as cultural change, is artfully expressed by Preloran.

Roxie Laybourne and Carla Dove at Feather Lab Open House

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Carla Dove (left) and Roxie Laybourne (right) are seated in folding chairs during the Feather Lab Open House in 2001. Behind them is a large window with mini blinds drawn closed. On the window ledge is a telephone and bottles.

Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume II, Explorations, Episodes and Adventures, Expositions and Congresses

Smithsonian Libraries
Devised title.

Binder's title: Random records.

Typewritten manuscript.

Also available online.

Related materials can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives RU007084, William Henry Holmes Papers, 1870-1931.

William Henry Holmes (1846-1933) was an anthropologist, archaeologist, artist, and geologist, who spent much of his career affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution. He studied art under Theodore Kauffman, and went on to work as a scientific illustrator with Smithsonian staff. In 1872, he was appointed artist-topographer to the United States survey of the territories under Ferdinand V. Hayden, and in 1874 was appointed assistant geologist. He went on to work with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE), until returning to the Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum (USNM). Holmes eventually became head curator of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology and Director of the National Gallery of Art.

AAPGRB copy also available on microfilm: MFM 1200 AAPGMAIN.

Elecresource

This is the second of sixteen volumes compiled by William Henry Holmes in 1931 or 1932 to document his life and work. The volume contains original correspondences, documents, ephemera, watercolors, and photographs throughout. It is divided into four sections. The first contains a list of descriptions of his explorations from 1872 to 1920. Section two describes episodes and adventures from 1872-1920. This begins with a list of stories, which he describes using portions of letters, original field note books, news clippings, photographs (also with colleagues), and original drawings including a field drawing of a flower. This includes work completed with A. C. Peale and geological notes from Hayden expedition. Field work locations include Yellowstone, Colorado, and Mexico. Section three describes expositions between 1876-1916 across the United States in which U.S. Geological Survey and Smithsonian Institution took part. Section four documents the second Pan American Congress in Washington, D.C., during December 1915- January 1916; Fourteenth International Congress in Stutgart, August 1904; and the nineteenth International Congress during December 1915 - January 1916.

Certificate of Achievement Awarded to N. Trinidad Pino Triana of Cuba

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested by Thomas Baker, Exhibits. From Torch article November, 1959: "Since Mr. Pino was the first Latin American to complete a training program at the Smithsonian Institution as a recipient of an Organization of American States fellowship, Dr. Carmimichael had invited various officials of the Cuban Embassy and the Organization of American States to be present at the ceremony. These officials were Ambassador Jose A. Fora, secretary general of the OAS; Dr. Angel Palerm, executive officer of the OAS; Dr. Javier Malagon, technical secretary of the OAS fellowship program; Dr. Ernesto Dihigo, Cuban ambassador, Dr. Perez Cisneros, Cuban ambassador to the OAS; and Dr. Aurelio Giroud, in charge of cultural affairs of the Cuban Embassy.

After completion of a six month training in the exhibits laboratory of the Museum of Natural History under the tutelage of Rolland O. Hower (left) and Watson Perrygo (second from left), N. Trinidad Pino Triana (third from left) of the Museo Provincial Ignacio Agramonte of Camaguey, Cuba, is awarded a certificate of achievement in the Regents' Room in the Smithsonian Institution Building, or Castle, by Secretary Leonard Carmichael (back right). Also pictured is Dr. Clifford Evans (back left), associate curator in the Division of Archeology, Department of Anthropology.

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-37OP 7/26/1978 (3:40p.m.)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery and Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-4 woman walking through village wearing a tall hat and has a baby strapped to her back with a cloth; 5 woman in tall hat; 6 woman with baby on her back and a tall hat; 7-10 small woman walking through village with a tall hat and braids; 12 man with boy crossing street, boy with his hand on the mans back; 13-14 row of boy monks sitting infront of painted wall, boy monk serving tea; 16 row of boy monks sitting infront of painted wall; 19 boy monk serving sitting monks tea, drum in background; 20 two boys holding a bowl and talking infront of a red column; 22-24 two monks with (long horn) on side aisle with red columns on one side of them and a row of boy monks on the other side; 25-26 monk leaning over with a stick, other monk playing a brown (horn); 27 same as 22-24; 28-30 center aisle, rows of monks two playing (cymbals) and chanting; 31 close up of two monks with dongmans; 33 rows of monks against wall; 34 same as 31; 35-36 center row monks chanting playing bub chal.

Imaginero 1970

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

Supplementary materials: audio tapes, still photographs, production files, correspondence, promotional materials and press clippings.

Archives also holds Spanish language original released under the title Hermogenes Cayo.

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research supported processing and the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Smithsonian Latino Center supported preservation of the Jorge Preloran Film Collection.

Donated by Jorge Preloran in 2007.

Edited film is an ethnobiography of Hermogenes Cayo, a religious image maker in the high Andean plateau of Argentina. The film portrays Hermogenes, his wife Aurelia Kilpe, and their children in their Andean lifestyle, as well as Hermogenes' passion for painting, carving, building, and his devotion to the virgin Mary. The film tells the story of how Hermogenes became an image maker and devotee to the virgin, thus capturing a lifestyle and philosophy rapidly disappearing. Hermogenes, if not the last, is one of the last image makers of his kind. His effigies, carved out of cactus root, are intricate and beautiful. The film includes Hermogenes reminisces, which are his narrations accompanied by old photographs. The audio track was made separately from the filming, so all of Hermogenes' or Aurelia's narrations overlay the footage. All narration is translated by the voice of Preloran, but the actual voices are clearly audible. The film does not follow a clear narrative structure, transitioning between themes and revisiting earlier themes later. In this way the film weaves a portrait of Hermogenes Cayo, the craft of image making, an indigenous Catholicism, marriage as well as portraying the lifestyle of a solitary Andean family braving the harsh conditions of the Andes. The relationship between individual and culture, as well as cultural change, is artfully expressed by Preloran.

Cut Glass Bowl

National Museum of American History
From its founding in 1846, the Smithsonian Institution was assumed to be the keeper of the national collections, although the "United States National Museum" did not emerge as a formal entity until 1858. Natural history and anthropology artifacts were the focus of the Museum's earliest collecting efforts, but by the late 19th century the Museum was collecting household goods, manufactured for the American and European market, that demonstrated technological and artistic advances in a wide range of industries. Between 1885 and 1920, American glass companies played an important role in building the new collections by donating examples of their currently fashionable glassware.

T. G. Hawkes & Company of Corning, New York, donated examples of their work to the Museum in 1917 and 1918, showcasing their rich or brilliant-cut glass. This bowl, donated by the firm in 1917, is cut and engraved, but also mounted in sterling silver—a newly fashionable style at the time.

Callicebus torquatus

NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
Item was destructively sampled. Tissue and/or parts were sent to Jessica Alfaro, University of California, Los Angeles - Anthropology, on 7 Nov 2014. For reference, see Transaction No. 2071436

Vessel

National Museum of African Art
Cast copper alloy five footed vessel with hinged lid. The handle is in the form of a snake biting a man. The spout issues from the mouth of a male two tailed animal, possibly a leopard or a monkey. In relief on the sides of the vessel are heads with arms and legs representing Ofoe, messenger of the god of death. The knob of the lid is a seated male figure. The core remains insidethe vessel and remains of sprues are around the rim.

Here’s What Three Mummies Might Have Looked Like While Alive

Smithsonian Magazine

The mummy faces. Photo: McGill University

As gruesome as they are to look at today, mummies were once animated individuals. It can be hard to keep that point in mind, however, when staring down at a shriveled, two-millennia-old corpse.

To bring three of McGill University’s mummies back to life, so to speak, a forensic artist and physical anthropologists teamed up for a facial reconstruction project.  The three-dimensional mummy portraits will be on display at the university’s Redpath Museum until February.

To figure out the nuances of the mummies’ flesh, the team used CT scans, radiocarbon analysis and 3-D printing technology to envision and manufacture the faces. Tissue depth data taken from ultrasonic imaging of modern Egyptians also helped to flesh out the faces. The artists went with a diversity of skin tones to reflect the mix of Mediterranean, North African and Sub-Saharan people that occupied Egypt throughout history. For the hairstyles, they relied upon early anthropological reports and from remnants left on the mummies themselves.

Their efforts resulted in three mummy faces: a young man, a young woman and a white-haired matron. For the first time in over 2,000 years, their faces now stare back at viewers, much as they might have appeared just before their deaths.

For a closer look at the mummies, check out this slideshow from Discover News.

More from Smithsonian.com:

CT Scanners Crack Open a Mummy Mystery
Even Mummy Doctors Forgot Tools in Their Patients Sometimes 

Ch'uan Miao Hill People of Western China ca. 1936

Human Studies Film Archives
Title supplied by Archives staff (unpublished work)--archival collection Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee Footage shot in southwestern China while Graham was curator of the West China Union Museum of Archeology, Art, and Ethnology at Chengtu. Film documents various customs of the Ch'uan Miao hill people (more commonly known as the Ch'uang Meo) in the villages of Chou Chia Keo and Wang Wu Chai near the borders of Szechwan, Kweichow, and Yunnan provinces. Documentation includes: children and adults in a Miao yard; a (shaman) conducting a ceremony to exercise demons; a (priest) conducting part of a funeral ceremony accompanied by an assistant playing a (six-tubed wind instrument); a trek to a Miao village led by Graham and two legions of school children; Graham's medical associates, W.R. Morse and Gordon Agnew, taking anthropometric measurements and making dental observations of villagers; group shots of Miao women and girls; a village do nun using divining sticks and performing an exorcism; and a funeral ceremony for one of the village women which involves sacrifice of a water buffalo and procession of the coffin. Footage forms part of the U.S. National Museum Division of Ethnology, Manuscript and Pamphlet File, National Anthropological Archives.

Roxie Laybourne Stands in Front of "Feather Focus" Exhibit Case

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Roxie Laybourne stands in front of an exhibition case featuring her feather research for an exhibit called "Feather Focus" from October 25, 1996 - June 20, 1997 in the Natural History Building. To the left in the picture is a television which would show information on the exhibit and the entrance to the Men's Room.

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-24OP 7/22/1978 (10:30am)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection

field notes and logs

Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 man, with three children in background in shade; 2 man with boy smiling and looking away from the camera; 3-5 young manin black with white scarf around his neck; 6-8 monk in red infront of colorful cloth; 9-10 baby in yellow pointing at adult; 11-14 man in tan sweater shooting arrow infront of tree; 15--16 man in tan sweater smiling at other men in foreground; 17 boy beside a tree; 18-20 two men bending over the dirt mound that is target taking out the arrows; 22 gilded statue with tall gold crown, white scarves on his lap; 26 embroidered buddhist diety on white seat with red skin and orange behind him, two llama like animals; 27 older monks sitting on throne with colorful decorations in foreground; 29 statue of monk in yellow robe and red hat; 30 gilded statue with blue hair wrapped in gold colored cloth; 31 gilded buddhist diety statue with gold crown infront of painting; 32 painting, old red buddhist diety with fire around him;33 gilded buddhist diety sculpture with blue hair; 34 two dieties painted on wall; 35 dark blue painting of dieties, one with many arms and other infront a lighter blue; 36 blue diety of him on white horse with dark green smoke in background

Ancient Carnivores Had a Taste for Neanderthal Meat

Smithsonian Magazine

Neanderthal hunters may themselves have been prey for big cats and other carnivores. According to a recent study, some punctures on Neanderthal fossils are likely bite marks from large carnivore attacks.

Scientists know what the average Neanderthal ate, how they hunted, who they mated with, how they divvied up chores and to some degree where they crossed paths with large carnivores. Evidence from archaeological and paleontological sites indicates that Neanderthals scavenged the leftovers of big carnivores, hunted them and even competed with them for cave shelters.

Recently, a team of Spanish researchers used modern cases of carnivore attacks on humans to see if bite marks on Neanderthal bones bore similarities. Looking at 124 recent case of attacks by lions, tigers, bears, leopards and other carnivores on modern humans, they found similarities to marked bones in the fossil record during the Pleistocene between 40,000 and 200,000 years ago. The group posits that bite marks could have been the result of a carnivore attack. However, it's unclear how often these attacks might have occurred.

In one case, they pinpointed the carnivorous perpetrator. Puncture marks in the skull of a young Neanderthal child unearthed in a cave in Valencia, Spain, resemble those from modern big cat attacks. Their results appear in this month's issue of Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences.

Understanding how Neanderthals interacted with big cats and other contemporary predators could perhaps inform how we share our own environment with large wildlife. "The conflict between humans and large carnivores has been present and constant throughout human evolution, enduring even to modern times," the researchers write. Though modern humans outcompeted Neanderthals for resources, it's possible that carnivore threats exacerbated their demise, they argue.

Given that Neanderthals lived amid these predators, perhaps it's not too surprising that some of the hominids met their end at the jaws of a ferocious animal.

Arrow

National Museum of the American Indian

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-26OP 7/22/1978 (2pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 monks seated in a row in the (main prayer room), two of them have (horns) and one holding beads; 3 two monks sitting by wooden table, one beats drum; 4 monk sitting behind wooden table with colorful boxes in niches behind them; 6 monk sitting behind thin wooden tables looking into an orange cup; infront of an old wall painting of diety on horse; 7 boy monk serving an older sitting monk tea; 8 boy monk serving tea to monk with glasses on; 9 boy monk serving tea to monk infront of wall of colorful boxes; 11-14 monk in throne of dukang chanting and (hand gestures); 16 boy monk serving tea to monk in sunglasses; 17 boy monk serving tea to monk sitting infront of wall painting of diety on white horse; 18-19 older monk leaning against column playing (cymbals) 20 two boy monks and two older monks talking infront of wall painting; 21 boy monk by drum; 22 boy monk serving rice and vegetables to men, monk standing behind the boy; 23 man with crossed legs sitting infront of notched wall with colorful boxes; 24-25 monks sititng infront of notched wall, one eating rice and vegetables, other reading; 27 high angle shot of rooftops of white washed buildings; 28-31 entrance of dukang from courtyard in wood with balcony over it; 32 rooftop with monk looking at valley; 33 boy monks, one descending stairs, other standing by wall painting; 34 older monk holding prayer beads on balcony infront of wall painting; 35-37 boy monk carrying bronze kettle of tea past whitewashed wall

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India 7/18-22/1978

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 Art, carving in molding of door opening with painting onthe wall beside it; 3 painted blue door and carvings around door with buddhist painting over the door; 4 carving oflions and other animals infront of small buddha carving over door; 5-6 close up of blue carving of buddhist figures over the door; 7 close up of blue carvings to the left of the door; 8 close up of carved, painting and gilded goddess with multiple faces; 9 carving of squatting figure infront of multiple carving of the same small figure repeated; 10 carving of buddhist diety with gilded crown facing the camera, blue enamaled dragons to the side of the diety; 11 man in tan shirt looking up standing infront of a doorway; 12-13 Art, gilded buddhist diety carving with blue hair infront of painted wall; 14 landscape witholder eroded temple like buildins in foreground, one with spire raising above building infront of green hill; 15 blue buddhist diety statue with crown and beads next to a hand with white anils and gold and blue enameled bracelet; 16 statue of buddhist diety, gilded, low shot of belly of statue; 17 white goddess statue, very dark picture; 18 man standing with boy; 19 boys standing infront of stone wall, small boy infront wearing blue; 20 close up of two boys one on left wearing hat; 21-26 boys infront of stone wall, ages ranging from toddler to teenager; 27 boy walking with toddler girl on his back infront of grass field and mountains; 28 boy moving, sitting on the floor of the (main prayer room) facing candles; 28-30 three monks standing infront of wall painting, two with arms around each others shoulders talking; 31-35 two monks infront of wall painting, laughing, talking, and horsing around; 36 taken from monastery roof with three monks in foregrounf landscape with houses, fields, and mountains in background; 37 boy monk in doorway with hands on molding above the door

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-77OP 8/19/1978

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection

field notes and logs

Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1monk walking through pathway with trees at either side; 2-3 woman with tall hat holding a child standking next to young girl; 4-8 man in tan sweater with red shirt wrapped around his waist sitting next to a woman with a tan cap who is leaning aagainst stone wall; 9 same as 2-3; 10 woman holding a baby, a man in foreground and stone wall in background; 11 young boy in purple next to a woman in goatskin shawl; 12 woman in tall hat with baby breast feeding; 13 old woamn wititng next to standing woman infront of stone building; 15 two women in clearing, one of them holding a baby in her lap, a box with wool infront of them; 16 old woman wearing goatskin shawl wifting on rocks next to a boy in a wollen cap; 17 same as 15; 18 three girls on rocks in cleaing sitting in a row with a boy infront wearint a woolen cap; 19 same as 15,17; 20-21 old man sitting next to basket on rooftop next to stone pen, sticks for fire in foreground; 22 same as 15,17,19; 23-24 same as 18; 25 older woman in foreground in goatskin shawl sititng near enterance to underground building; 26 same as 15,17,19,22; 27 old man sitting on rooftop next to stone walls, firewood in foreground; 28 old man in oragne sweater with red robe sititng, mountains in backgrund; 29 old woman in foreground wearing goatskin shawl sititng infront of woman with baby; 30 same as 23-24; 31-32 groupd of women tlking, sitting in semicircle around box of ool; 33 old woman in goatskin shawl, a girl and baby in wool cap sitting beside each other smiling; 34 semicircle of woman infront of box of wool witting near a boy and sitting on rocks; 35 same as 31-32; 36 mountains and valley; 37 same as 31-32, 35

General Building Plan for NMNH

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For other views of exterior drawings of the United States National Museum, see Negs. SIA2009-2364, SIA2009-2365, SIA2009-2366, SIA2009-2068, SIA2009-2069, SIA2009-2070, SIA2009-2071, SIA2009-2072

This print can be located in the Smithsonian Institution Archives Reading Room. Creator Drawing Number: N/A. The Drawing Control Number is S04/I1119. Reproduction Negative Numbers: 19087, 89-12908. This image is the same as drawing negative number 19087, located in Record Unit 95, Box 33, Folder: 1.

Print of and original architectural site plan of the National Museum of Natural History building, originally known as the United States National Museum. The print includes areas inside the building labeled as proposed disciplines for each section in biology, geology, and anthropology. Streets are identified as "B Street North" (now Constitution Avenue) on the north side of the building and "North Street" (now known as Madison Drive on the Mall side of the building. Drawn in 1904 by architects J. C. Hornblower and J. R. Marshall, the image has an inscribed title of "General Plan." The process recorded is "Photograph," and the original print is 9.50"h x 14.00"w.

Roxie Laybourne Examining a Dented Aircraft Nose Cone

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Roxie Laybourne was an American ornithologist known for her ability to identify species of birds involved in bird strikes. In the Bird Division at National Museum of Natural History, she is standing and grinning at the camera at a counter holding a dented red and white aircraft nose cone.
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