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Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-22OP 7/21/1978 (4pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection

field notes and logs

Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-13 mmen cluttered shooting arrows in archery contest, they wear black outfits with purple sashes, pink and blue ribbons; 14-15 two meni infront, one older taking his shot next to a man in a tall hat with a younger man behind them; 16 younger man in black shooting arrow next to a man in a tall hat and black who is watching; 17 older monk infront of bright cloth hung on back of tent; 18 men sititng infront of colorful cloth in tent with tables holding tea cups infront of them; 19-22 man with tan sweater infront of flowery cloth; 23-24 two boys talking, one holding an arrow up; 25-26 a man dressed in black with a white scarf around his neck and a pink and blue ribbon on his chest; 27-28 man in tan sweater and white scarf showing a boy with a white scarf an arrow; 29 same as 19-22; 20 same as 17; 32 manin black holding a child and looking to his right; 34-35 three boys talking and laughing, one in a tan sweater, the other two in black. all with white scarves, three small boys leaning on a blanket and watching something in the shade of a tent; 38 a man aiming an arrow, a blue cloth hainging in the background, the man wearing black with blue on his sleeves

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India 7/18/1978 (10am)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection

field notes and logs

Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 girl leading three sheep through field past a man who is crouching onthe path; 2-4 buddhist diety carving on the cliff face of a mountain, in foreground white washed building; 5-8 buddhist diety carving on the cliff face of a mountain; 9 valley with road and small whitewashed buildings along the road in a line; 11-16 landscape, vilalge and monastery on hill in valley; 18 art, wheel design with three eyed red faced diety above the circle, a red center with a bird, snake and dark animal, landscape in design; 20 Art, a buddhist diety with a red face and blue and green clouds behind him, holding a gold object, wearing a gold crown and a red hat; 21 Art, painting of man with white cloth over his hair holding a white horn and not wearing a shirt, holding a blue basket of colorful fruit; 22 Art, painting of face of a dragon with an orange face and green curls with a cloth in its mouth; 23 painting of peacock on a white background with peacock feather pattern in background; 26 Art, same dragon as in 22 but resting chin on cloth; 27 Art, painting of buddhist diety with a large mouth and fangs, orange with flowing red hair with a raised staff; 29-32 boy sitting on ledge of balcony of yellow building, shot from patio below and across courtyard; 34-36 old man in purple robe with tall black hat; 37 long shot of valley with white washed buildings

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-38OP 7/26/1978 (4p.m.)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery and Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-2 man with a bundle strapped to his back, walking by painted white stairs; 3-4 two men standing by a wtone wall, one with a bundle strapped to his back and the other man is wearing a black robe; 5-7 long shot of boy monks sitting in a row against a wall under a painted stripped design; 8-9 monks sitting in a row on center aisle, windows in background, two large drums and a (horn) by the monks, in foreground a column and monk; 10-15 same as 5-7; 16 same as 8-9; 17-19 row of boy monks with one older monk sitting against a wall, in foreground a table with 5 white tea cups; 20-24 Shabdung Rinpoche smiling and looking at the camera, cups and a (bell) infront of him; 25 Luding Khen Rinpoche in a throne with Shabdung in a lowerthrone beside him, white scarves behind his throne; 26-28 similar to 25, Luding Khen wearing a red robe; 29-31 same as 5-7; 32 line of monks on center aisle in a row, one with a kangling infront of him; 33-34 close up of boy monks, on in center with hands together praying; 35 Shabdung with hands together in prayer in lower throne with white scareves behind him

Foodways Friday: Cumin Pork

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Tian Yali in the Five Spice Kitchen making another one of her specialties, dumplings. Photo by Karlie Leung
Tian Yali in the Five Spice Kitchen making another one of her specialties, dumplings.
Photo by Karlie Leung

Tian Yali brought this dish to the 2014 Folklife Festival from Tongchuan City in Yijun County, Shaanxi Province. A versatile artist, Tian also demonstrated the art of paper cutting at the Festival and is proficient in other traditional crafts such as embroidery, painting, sachet making, and sculpting edible dough figurines. At the end of the cooking demo for this dish, she also sang one of her favorite folk songs from her home county!

Tian loves to make this dish at home for dinner or as a snack. She explained that in order for the dish to serve as a full meal, it must always be served with what in Chinese cooking is considered a “main food.” In China, the “main food” differs regionally but is always some form of bread, grain, or starch. In southern China, rice is a prevalent staple in most meals. In the north, where rice doesn’t grow as well, wheat-based foods such as pancakes are consumed during meals. Try this dish with your favorite starchy side.

Ingredients

1 lb pork belly
1 egg
2 tbs oyster sauce
2 tbs vinegar
2 tsp sticky rice powder (available at most Asian markets)
3 tbs cumin
2 tbs paprika
Vegetable oil

Toothpicks

Preparation

  • Remove skin from pork and cut meat into one-inch cubes.
  • Stir together oyster sauce, vinegar, egg, and sticky rice powder. Add to pork and mix so that each piece is thoroughly coated.
  • Skewer three to four pieces of pork onto each toothpick until there is no more pork.
  • Fill a wok or skillet a little less than a third of the way full with vegetable oil and heat. When the oil is hot, add the toothpicks with pork. Fry pork until cooked through and crispy (about four minutes).
  • Remove meat to a paper towel to drain the oil. Move pork to a plate, and dust the skewers heavily with cumin, paprika, and salt to taste. Serve warm with rice or pancakes.

Michaela Wright worked as a production intern for the 2014 Folklife Festival. She studies anthropology and art history at the College of William and Mary.

Not-So-Down Days

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
This is the greeting party that meets participants when they arrive in D.C. From L to R: Transportation coordinator Andrew Bautista, transportation assistant Jacob Spaar, participant coordinator Karen Stark, and participant intern Kelly Smale. Photo by Lucy Lundstrom
This is the greeting party that meets participants when they arrive in D.C. From L to R: Transportation coordinator Andrew Bautista, transportation assistant Jacob Spaar, participant coordinator Karen Stark, and participant intern Kelly Smale.
Photo by Lucy Lundstrom

The hotel is quiet for a moment—the lobby has emptied except for a few porters and members of the participant staff, who all look a bit bewildered, though relieved, by the rare moment of peace. Everyone is waiting with baited breath for the next group of participants, who have been gradually arriving from the airports and train stations over the past few days. The lull in activity never lasts for long, though, and this is no exception. All of a sudden people pour in through the rotating doors, fresh off of the plane and looking exhausted from a long day of travel but excited to have finally arrived. The hubbub begins again, and the participant staff gets to work, welcoming the most recent arrivals and handing out room keys and festival information.

Everyone seems to be feeling a bit more prepared after braving the first week of the Festival, and there is a fine art to navigating one’s way through the chaos of the moment that everyone on Participant Staff has clearly mastered. During the two down days before the second week of the festival begins, the National Mall has quieted down, but the hotel where the participants are staying is constantly buzzing with activity.

As an intern for Participant Staff, I have enjoyed every minute of my time at the hotel, both during the Festival and on the down days. Often, the first people that the arriving participants meet off the plane are members of the Participant Staff, and it is so much fun to see participants relaxing at the hotel after a long week of performing on the Mall, or connecting on the phone with family and friends back home. During the festival’s down days when the activity on the Mall has slowed down, the action at the hotel continues on without ceasing as everyone works together to ensure that the second week of the festival will be just as much fun as the first.

Lucy is an intern at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. She recently graduated from Colorado University Boulder, where she studied anthropology.

“Shout Out to RAIN…”

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Rain falls on the National Mall on June 28, 2013, day 3 of the 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Photo by Sojin Kim
Rain falls on the National Mall on June 28, 2013, day 3 of the 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.
Photo by Sojin Kim

On a small but growing shout out wall inside a staff trailer on the National Mall, someone has written on a hot pink heart: Shout out to RAIN…for bringing people together. The heart went up after a rousing concert by the Seldom Scene at Danubia Stage where, while sheets of rain blanketed the Festival grounds, crowds braved a fierce but fickle storm. There is something surreal about seeing just about one thousand folks, huddled together under a vinyl tent, rendered frankly unaware of the weather by the soulful twang of a bluegrass band. Backstage during the show, members of our tech crew sloshed through three inches of muddy water to lay flooring over the flooded grass, young Hungarian boys snuck tissues from the band’s stash to wipe their muddied costumes, and staffers waded while waiting to greet the band with their increasingly earthy green room requests.

Earlier the same day, having been chased off the site by the storm’s earlier incarnation, visitors and participants alike found themselves convened in the National Museum of American History, dancing and singing while Hungarian violinists urged the sun back with a spirited set. Staffers sprouted mud-made polka-dotted legs while puddle-jumping to reopen the Festival after a brief afternoon hiatus. A brown rain spot expanded exponentially as dedicated dancers partied—barefoot—through the evening in our Tokaj Tavern. And with each new downpour, mud-puddle, and pair of abandoned shoes, fresh opportunities to bond abounded.

Returning to a staff trailer at sundown while the dance party continued to rage on the National Mall, a summer intern posted the hot-pink homage to our afternoon. Shout out to RAIN. Somehow it sums up our Friday impeccably. The Folklife Festival has always been a little scrappy, in the best of ways. It’s fun to be around when scraps take root.

Chloe Ahmann serves as our Festival’s Special Events Coordinator. During the academic year, she teaches at George Washington University, where she is earning her Ph.D. in Anthropology.

Roxie Laybourne and Doug Deedrick with Microscope

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Doug Deedrick (left) and Roxie Laybourne (right) behind a counter in the Bird Division of the National Museum of Natural History. Roxie is looking through a microscope of a feather which she is manipulating with forceps. Doug Deedrick leans forward to look at the slide on the microscope.

Hermogenes Cayo 1970

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

Supplementary materials: audio tapes, still photographs, production files, correspondence, promotional materials and press clippings.

Archives also holds English language version released under the title Imaginero.

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research supported processing and the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Smithsonian Latino Center supported preservation of the Jorge Preloran Film Collection.

Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee

Donated by Jorge Preloran in 2007.

Edited film is an ethnobiography of Hermogenes Cayo, a religious image maker in the high Andean plateau of Argentina. The film portrays Hermogenes, his wife Aurelia Kilpe, and their children in their Andean lifestyle, as well as Hermogenes' passion for painting, carving, building, and his devotion to the virgin Mary. The film tells the story of how Hermogenes became an image maker and devotee to the virgin, thus capturing a lifestyle and philosophy rapidly disappearing. Hermogenes, if not the last, is one of the last image makers of his kind. His effigies, carved out of cactus root, are intricate and beautiful. The film includes Hermogenes reminisces, which are his narrations accompanied by old photographs. The audio track was made separately from the filming, so all of Hermogenes' or Aurelia's narrations overlay the footage. All narration is translated by the voice of Preloran, but the actual voices are clearly audible. The film does not follow a clear narrative structure, transitioning between themes and revisiting earlier themes later. In this way the film weaves a portrait of Hermogenes Cayo, the craft of image making, an indigenous Catholicism, marriage as well as portraying the lifestyle of a solitary Andean family braving the harsh conditions of the Andes. The relationship between individual and culture, as well as cultural change, is artfully expressed by Preloran.

Roxie Laybourne and Carla Dove at Feather Lab Open House

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Carla Dove (left) and Roxie Laybourne (right) are seated in folding chairs during the Feather Lab Open House in 2001. Behind them is a large window with mini blinds drawn closed. On the window ledge is a telephone and bottles.

Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume II, Explorations, Episodes and Adventures, Expositions and Congresses

Smithsonian Libraries
Devised title.

Binder's title: Random records.

Typewritten manuscript.

Also available online.

Related materials can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives RU007084, William Henry Holmes Papers, 1870-1931.

William Henry Holmes (1846-1933) was an anthropologist, archaeologist, artist, and geologist, who spent much of his career affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution. He studied art under Theodore Kauffman, and went on to work as a scientific illustrator with Smithsonian staff. In 1872, he was appointed artist-topographer to the United States survey of the territories under Ferdinand V. Hayden, and in 1874 was appointed assistant geologist. He went on to work with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE), until returning to the Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum (USNM). Holmes eventually became head curator of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology and Director of the National Gallery of Art.

AAPGRB copy also available on microfilm: MFM 1200 AAPGMAIN.

Elecresource

This is the second of sixteen volumes compiled by William Henry Holmes in 1931 or 1932 to document his life and work. The volume contains original correspondences, documents, ephemera, watercolors, and photographs throughout. It is divided into four sections. The first contains a list of descriptions of his explorations from 1872 to 1920. Section two describes episodes and adventures from 1872-1920. This begins with a list of stories, which he describes using portions of letters, original field note books, news clippings, photographs (also with colleagues), and original drawings including a field drawing of a flower. This includes work completed with A. C. Peale and geological notes from Hayden expedition. Field work locations include Yellowstone, Colorado, and Mexico. Section three describes expositions between 1876-1916 across the United States in which U.S. Geological Survey and Smithsonian Institution took part. Section four documents the second Pan American Congress in Washington, D.C., during December 1915- January 1916; Fourteenth International Congress in Stutgart, August 1904; and the nineteenth International Congress during December 1915 - January 1916.

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-37OP 7/26/1978 (3:40p.m.)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery and Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-4 woman walking through village wearing a tall hat and has a baby strapped to her back with a cloth; 5 woman in tall hat; 6 woman with baby on her back and a tall hat; 7-10 small woman walking through village with a tall hat and braids; 12 man with boy crossing street, boy with his hand on the mans back; 13-14 row of boy monks sitting infront of painted wall, boy monk serving tea; 16 row of boy monks sitting infront of painted wall; 19 boy monk serving sitting monks tea, drum in background; 20 two boys holding a bowl and talking infront of a red column; 22-24 two monks with (long horn) on side aisle with red columns on one side of them and a row of boy monks on the other side; 25-26 monk leaning over with a stick, other monk playing a brown (horn); 27 same as 22-24; 28-30 center aisle, rows of monks two playing (cymbals) and chanting; 31 close up of two monks with dongmans; 33 rows of monks against wall; 34 same as 31; 35-36 center row monks chanting playing bub chal.

Vessel

National Museum of African Art
Cast copper alloy five footed vessel with hinged lid. The handle is in the form of a snake biting a man. The spout issues from the mouth of a male two tailed animal, possibly a leopard or a monkey. In relief on the sides of the vessel are heads with arms and legs representing Ofoe, messenger of the god of death. The knob of the lid is a seated male figure. The core remains insidethe vessel and remains of sprues are around the rim.

Roxie Laybourne and Carla Dove with Black Vulture

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Roxie Laybourne (left) and Carla Dove (right) behind a counter in the Bird Division of the National Museum of Natural History. Carla Dove is holding a study skin of a black vulture. Roxie holds a feather with forceps in her right hand. On the counter in front of them are boxes of feathers and bird remains, a letter, a black wing, and a stack of open envelopes.

An essay on the natural history of Guiana, in South America : containing a description of many curious productions in the animal and vegetable systems of that country : together with an account of the religion, manners, and customs of several tribes of its Indian inhabitants : interspersed with a variety of literary and medical observations : in several letters / from a gentleman of the medical faculty during his residence in that country

Smithsonian Libraries
Signatures: [A]⁴ B-2C⁸ 2D⁴.

Engraved frontispiece signed: M. Park delin.

Dedication signed (p. 3, 1st paging group): Edward Bancroft.

Booksellers' advertisements: leaves 2D3-2D4.

Sabin 3106

ESTC (RLIN) T78909

Also available online.

SCNHRB has three copies.

SCNHRB c. 1 (39088013481866) stamped on t.p.: Library of Congress Smithsonian Deposit Apr 23 1881 [ms. acc. no.] 109576.

SCNHRB c. 1 bound in green pebbled sheepskin, title in gilt on spine (at foot of spine: National Museum), marbled edges and endpapers.

SCNHRB c. 2 (39088013481908) has bookplate: Division of Physical Anthropology, U.S. National Museum. The Hrdlička Library.

SCNHRB c. 2 has ink ms. initials on t.p.: JV.

SCNHRB c. 2 bound in light brown calf, title in gilt on spine (leaves encased).

SCNHRB c. 3 (39088013481940) inscribed in ink on front free endpaper: A. Wetmore.

SCNHRB c. 3 has a few pencilled ms. notes.

SCNHRB c. 3 has frontispiece bound following p. 214.

SCNHRB c. 3 stamped on t.p.: Smithsonian Libraries Aug 04 1986 [and] withdrawn.

SCNHRB c. 3 bound in light brown cloth, title in gilt on spine.

Elecresource

Roxie Laybourne Stands in Front of "Feather Focus" Exhibit Case

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Roxie Laybourne stands in front of an exhibition case featuring her feather research for an exhibit called "Feather Focus" from October 25, 1996 - June 20, 1997 in the Natural History Building. To the left in the picture is a television which would show information on the exhibit and the entrance to the Men's Room.

Roxie Laybourne Testing Materials from Aircraft Part

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
With Smithsonian Secretary Alexander Wetmore's encouragement, Laybourne accepted a short-term appointment in 1944 in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History, working with taxidermist Watson Perrygo and curator Herbert Friedmann. Known as the "Feather Lady," Laybourne pioneered the field of forensic ornithology at the Smithsonian Institution by studying the detailed microscopic structure of plumaceous (downy) feather barbules and creating a technique of identifying species of birds from fragmentary feather samples. Her methods revolutionized aviation safety by creating a technique of identifying birds involved in aircraft bird strikes. That work led to the development of the first laboratory in the world dedicated solely to feather identification. The methods she developed are now routinely applied to studies of prey remains, evidence from criminal cases, and anthropological artifacts.

For more images of Roxie Laybourne, see SIA2009-2205, SIA2010-0575, SIA2010-0580, SIA2010-0639, SIA2014-07398, SIA2014-07403, SIA2014-07404, SIA2014-07405, SIA2014-07406, SIA2014-07407, SIA2014-07411, SIA2014-07413, SIA2014-07417, SIA2014-07421, SIA2014-07431, SIA2014-07434, SIA2014-07441, SIA2014-07442, and SIA2014-07448.

Roxie Laybourne was an American ornithologist known for her ability to identify species of birds involved in bird strikes. She is pictured bent over at a counter in the Bird Division at the National Museum of Natural History examining material from an aircraft part. There are two glass vials with rubber stoppers, a metal box, and a piece of an aircraft on the counter.

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India 7/20/1978 (2:30pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 2-4 groupd of people, 2 women with babies, one with a (turquoise hat) and one wearing a tall hat, both sitting with children all around them in courtyard; 6 girl with goatskin shawl walking; 8-10 3 women and one man standing near a tent, two women with peyraks and a child standing nearby; 11-12 boys standing and talking, one looking up beside a stone drop off, possibly taken from structure roof; 13 boy looking up with his hands out as if he is going to catch something standing near white tent; 14-19 same boy looking up with hands out near blue tent surrounded by men and boys; 20 sitting women in peyraks with children; 21 sitting women and children infront of stone wall that leads towards a sructure; 22 women in peyrak handing baby in pink to a man, other woman and children nearby; 24 women and children sititng close together talking; 25-26 two boy monks talking and walking towards group of standing women in tall hates; 27--28 boy in grey coat walking with his hands up infront of a woman in a tall hat; 29-31 gilded buddhist diety statue, white scarved in hands of statues; 32 men bowing to gilded statue; 33 mans hand together infront of painted wall; 35-36 different gilded statue with black and white checkered scarf in its hands and a crown on its head; 37 embroidery of landscape and circle design on cloth

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-31OP 7/24/1978 (12:45pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-2 monk playing black and gilded (horn); 3-4 young monk playing drum with two drumsticks; 6-8 aisle and line of monke in (main prayer room) , two playing kangling and one in background playing (cymbals) 9-12 two monks sitting, one with is hands in his lap and one playing drum with two drumsticks;13 boy monk serving older monk in grey blanket besdie a wooden column; 15 older monk makin g hand gestures with red and gold pot on table infront of him; 16 two monks, on in red with yellow boarder, other kneeling on floor; 17 older monk in red holding hand and part of robe infront of him; 18 older monk inred kneeling with head to floor inprayer; 19-20 older monk returning to throng in center of dukang; 21 Steve Schecter talking to Rado, steve holding film camera; 22 line of monks sititng on center aidle of dukan being served tea by boy monk; 23 two older monks in corner by painted wall being served tea by boy monk; 24-35 monk in throne in dukang chanting with wyes clsoied with buddha statue behind him; 36-37 older monk sitting

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-30OP 7/24/1978 (12:30pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1-2 line of monks in the (main prayer room) sitting and talking, tables infront of small cups and (horn) infront of tables; 3-4 three monks by drum; 5 monks sitting infront of drum; 6-8 two boy monks talking and holding white object by notched wall; 10-11 monk with moustache sitting against a wall thats painted inside dukang; 12 boy monks infront of notched wall, sitting and watching camera; 13-14 two older monks sitting; 16 monks sititng with their tables infront of them beside column and drum; 17 boy monk serving tea to older monks; 19-22 line of monks sititng in dukang being served by boy monk; 23 three monks sitting next to column and drum being served tea by boy monk; 24 boy monk holding metal kettle with tea; 25 boy monk serving tea to monk next to wooden cabinet; 26 boy monk serving to two monks infront of notched wall; 27 three monks sititng in a line talking with cups full of tea; 28 man in beige sweater talking to monk infront of painted wall; 29 same as 27; 30-36 older monk playing (bell) and holding (hand drum) making (hand gestures) as chating; 37-38 two monks playing their kangling

Where Are All the Babies in Archaeological Sites?

Smithsonian Magazine

When archaeologists uncover ancient ruins, they usually find bones. Humans have an incredible, variable history of funeral traditions, and death rituals are remarkably telling about a group of people's world view. But one mystery has long puzzled archaeologists: where are the babies? It’s common to find adult burial sites and adult remains, but very few sites feature baby bones. Of course, we know that babies die, and far more frequently in the past than they do now. So, where are their bones?

Katy Meyers at the blog Bones Don’t Lie presents a few theories. Perhaps babies were buried in separate cemeteries we just haven’t found. Or perhaps their remains decayed quicker because they are so small. One possibility is that infants, unlike their adult caretakers, were cremated after death.

This presents a problem for archaeologists, since cremation leaves little behind for them to study. But Meyers points out that archaeologists have started looking a bit harder at cremation, to see if they could indeed find traces of cremated bodies in archaeological sites. To do so, they need to understand what cremation leaves behind. And to do that, a few archaeologists set fire to some piglets.

Meyers explains what they found:

The results of the study showed that the skeletal remains of the piglet made up between 2.18 and 3.28 % of the original weight prior to burning. This fits with similar findings for infant human remains when done at modern crematoria- though the remains of the piglet were slightly more intact than modern infant cremation due to the conditions of a pyre versus professional crematoria. Jæger and Johanson (2013) argue that based on this experiment, infant remains would be able to withstand the thermic stress of a cremation. They conclude that we should look to socio-anthropological sources of difference in burial- not preservation as the reason for low infant remains in the past. They propose that it is likely that cultural conditioning caused treatment and burial of deceased infants to be done differently from adults, and it is likely that we’re just not looking in the right places for them. 

In other words, baby bones should be able to withstand cremation, and be around for us to find. So the fact that we can’t find the bones doesn’t just mean that the babies were all cremated, but rather that we’re still not looking in the right places, or in the right ways. 

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-81OP 9/30/1978

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 boy monk in pink jacket looking down, boy in yellow in foreground; 2 boy monk in pink jacket looking down, 3-4 close up of boy monk, other monks behind him; 5 boy monk in yellow jacket with a book; 6 boy monk in yellow jacket; 7-8 boy monks looking forwards; 9-11 boy monks in orange and red; 12 boy monk in red jacket holding book; 13 boy in red jacket; 14-15 moy monk in yellow jacket; 16 monastery buildings infront of mountains; 17-18 woman in tall hat with man in tan cap holding baby girl in courtyard; 19 woman in tall hat infront of man with baby; 20 shrine with candles and butter sculpter in (main prayer room) 21 monks in clearing, trees infront of them; 22 people lined up on wall of rooftop, looking over it, mountains in background; 23 womanin goatskin shawl next to a ladder entering a doorway; 24 manin red cap; 25-26 man in tan cap in field in foregound, monastery on hill in background; 27 man sitting nexct to screen in field of hay; 28 woman in field leaning against pitchfork; 29-30 woman in tall hat facing camera, man with back to camera, tossing hay into air; 31 woman in tall hat with pitchfork in field; 32 man in field tossing hay with pitchfork, mountains in background; 33 woman in foreground tossing hay, trees in background; 34 woman aind man in field tossing hay, buildings in background; 35-36 man in foreground tossing hay with woman in background

Random records of a lifetime, 1846-1931 [actually 1932] volume I, Brief biography, positions held, Loubat Prizes, medals, etc., societies and clubs, bibliography

Smithsonian Libraries
Devised title.

Binder's title: Random records.

Typewritten manuscript.

Also available online.

Related materials can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives RU007084, William Henry Holmes Papers, 1870-1931.

William Henry Holmes (1846-1933) was an anthropologist, archaeologist, artist, and geologist, who spent much of his career affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution. He studied art under Theodore Kauffman, and went on to work as a scientific illustrator with Smithsonian staff. In 1872, he was appointed artist-topographer to the United States survey of the territories under Ferdinand V. Hayden, and in 1874 was appointed assistant geologist. He went on to work with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE), until returning to the Smithsonian Institution, United States National Museum (USNM). Holmes eventually became head curator of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology and Director of the National Gallery of Art.

AAPGRB copy also available on microfilm: MFM 1200 AAPGMAIN.

Elecresource

This is one of sixteen volumes compiled by William Henry Holmes in 1931 or 1932 to document his life and work. The volume contains original correspondences, documents, ephemera, watercolors, and photographs throughout. It is divided into six sections. The first describes the content of the 20 volumes and biography. The second section provides an overview of positions held including those at the U.S. Geological Survey and Smithsonian, as well as trips abroad. The positions are documented with original correspondence and official documents. The third section describes appointments, memberships and awards. Section five includes various types of societies and clubs to which he belonged, including scientific and artistic. The last sections contains a bibliography.

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-26OP 7/22/1978 (2pm)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection field notes and logs Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 monks seated in a row in the (main prayer room), two of them have (horns) and one holding beads; 3 two monks sitting by wooden table, one beats drum; 4 monk sitting behind wooden table with colorful boxes in niches behind them; 6 monk sitting behind thin wooden tables looking into an orange cup; infront of an old wall painting of diety on horse; 7 boy monk serving an older sitting monk tea; 8 boy monk serving tea to monk with glasses on; 9 boy monk serving tea to monk infront of wall of colorful boxes; 11-14 monk in throne of dukang chanting and (hand gestures); 16 boy monk serving tea to monk in sunglasses; 17 boy monk serving tea to monk sitting infront of wall painting of diety on white horse; 18-19 older monk leaning against column playing (cymbals) 20 two boy monks and two older monks talking infront of wall painting; 21 boy monk by drum; 22 boy monk serving rice and vegetables to men, monk standing behind the boy; 23 man with crossed legs sitting infront of notched wall with colorful boxes; 24-25 monks sititng infront of notched wall, one eating rice and vegetables, other reading; 27 high angle shot of rooftops of white washed buildings; 28-31 entrance of dukang from courtyard in wood with balcony over it; 32 rooftop with monk looking at valley; 33 boy monks, one descending stairs, other standing by wall painting; 34 older monk holding prayer beads on balcony infront of wall painting; 35-37 boy monk carrying bronze kettle of tea past whitewashed wall

Film Studies of Traditional Tibetan Life and Culture: Ladakh, India, 1978 86.13.3-24OP 7/22/1978 (10:30am)

Human Studies Film Archives
title derived from name of project (unpublished work)--archival collection

field notes and logs

Slide photographs shot in Mathoo Monastery, Mathoo Village, Ladakh, India. Numbers 1 man, with three children in background in shade; 2 man with boy smiling and looking away from the camera; 3-5 young manin black with white scarf around his neck; 6-8 monk in red infront of colorful cloth; 9-10 baby in yellow pointing at adult; 11-14 man in tan sweater shooting arrow infront of tree; 15--16 man in tan sweater smiling at other men in foreground; 17 boy beside a tree; 18-20 two men bending over the dirt mound that is target taking out the arrows; 22 gilded statue with tall gold crown, white scarves on his lap; 26 embroidered buddhist diety on white seat with red skin and orange behind him, two llama like animals; 27 older monks sitting on throne with colorful decorations in foreground; 29 statue of monk in yellow robe and red hat; 30 gilded statue with blue hair wrapped in gold colored cloth; 31 gilded buddhist diety statue with gold crown infront of painting; 32 painting, old red buddhist diety with fire around him;33 gilded buddhist diety sculpture with blue hair; 34 two dieties painted on wall; 35 dark blue painting of dieties, one with many arms and other infront a lighter blue; 36 blue diety of him on white horse with dark green smoke in background
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