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Stanley Turrentine, 1984

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Stanley Turrentine playing the saxaphone during a performance in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. The photo is taken from a low angle and to Turrentine's right, showing him from the chest up. He wears a light colored suit and has his eyes closed while playing.

Stanley Jordan, 1985

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white sepia toned photograph of jazz musician Stanley Jordan playing guitar at a performance in Coconut Grove, FL. Jordan is photographed from a low angle. Part of the body and neck of his guitar are visible. He wears a dark shirt and has his eyes closed while playing.

Sirone, 1975

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of jazz musician and composer Sirone playing a trombone in New York City. The photo is taken from an extreme low angle and show's Sirone's whole body. He is playing the trombone, the slide of which projects out the top of the frame. He stands behind a music stand and an acoustic bass rests on its side near his feet.

Shelf, hanging

Smithsonian Gardens
Wire trellis and plant shelf designed to be hung on vertical surface. Heavy iron wire has been wrought to form the armature and hook. Over this is interwoven crimped wire in diagonal crisscross pattern to create a trellis. The plant shelf is oblong, semi-circular, has a decorative and functional shelf guard. The shelf was meant to hold potted plants that could be trained to grow up the trellis, as well as others pots that could be changed out based on the growing seasons. Under the shelf are decorative arabesque embellishments. The foot curl is oriented to the back surface and is stylistically reminiscent of curved feet on free standing pieces. The entire piece has been painted black over dark green. The French excelled at making these delicate wrought-iron and wire garden furniture which were popular in the mid-to-late nineteenth century. These pieces were appealing for both the garden and terrace because they were less obtrusive than other types of garden furnishings due to the near invisibility of the wire. The playful scrolls of this design are in the manner of the late-Regency style wrought-iron furnishings of the 1820s and 1830s. The most popular style of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century leading up to the Victorian era (1837-1901) was Neoclassicism. In America it has been called the American Empire style, Greek Revival, or Grecian style and was called Regency or Empire style in Europe. Neoclassicism was seen in painting, sculpture, furnishings, architecture, fashion, and even politics. This revival of classical taste was encouraged by the increased interest in classical, ancient, and antique forms inspired by recent excavations of in Italy, Greece, and Egypt. Neoclassicism pulled motifs, ornamentation, and forms from antiquity, as well as the Renaissance interpretation of the classical world. Elements of neoclassical design included fretwork, columns, palmettes, pilasters, acanthus leaves, tulips and lotus motifs, grotesque masks, processional reliefs, mythical creatures, laurel garlands, fruit swags, scrolls, tassels, fringe, passementerie, frieze decoration, lyres, and vases; as well as accurate depictions of flora, fauna, birds, and insects; and repeating patterns such as the Greek key and egg-and-dart. A characteristic of Neoclassical designs is strict symmetry of all the elements.

The most popular style of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century leading up to the Victorian era (1837-1901) was Neoclassicism. In America it has been called the American Empire style, Greek Revival, or Grecian style and was called Regency or Empire style in Europe. Neoclassicism was seen in painting, sculpture, furnishings, architecture, fashion, and even politics. This revival of classical taste was encouraged by the increased interest in classical, ancient, and antique forms inspired by recent excavations of in Italy, Greece, and Egypt. Neoclassicism pulled motifs, ornamentation, and forms from antiquity, as well as the Renaissance interpretation of the classical world. Elements of neoclassical design included fretwork, columns, palmettes, pilasters, acanthus leaves, tulips and lotus motifs, grotesque masks, processional reliefs, mythical creatures, laurel garlands, fruit swags, scrolls, tassels, fringe, passementerie, frieze decoration, lyres, and vases; as well as accurate depictions of flora, fauna, birds, and insects; and repeating patterns such as the Greek key and egg-and-dart. A characteristic of Neoclassical designs is strict symmetry of all the elements.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and is at an angle to the net. Her proper left hand holds the racquet and is in a backhand shot motion. Her proper left hand is raised behind her. The ball can be seen in front of Serena at about level with her head. Venus stands farther away from her father and is at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in front of her with both hands. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings, other people, and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and is at an angle to the net. Her proper right hand holds the racquet and is in a forehand shot motion. Her proper left hand is raised out in front of her proper right leg is angled to the ground and her proper right leg is bent. Venus stands closer to the camera and is at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in front of her with both hands. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in her proper right hand. Her proper left hand is out in front of her at waist level. Venus stands farther away from their father and is at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in her proper right hand. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus and Serena Williams. Venus (in the foreground) has her lips drawn inward and looks downward. Serena (in the background) is angled towards her sister and looks towards the left of the image. The sisters are wearing printed Reebok polo shirts. A chain-link fence is visible behind the girls.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and faces the net with a smile on her face. Her racquet is at her waist and is being held by both her hands. Venus stands slightly in front of Serena and is at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in her proper right hand in a forehand motion. Her proper left hand is raised and held away from her. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings, other people, and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and is facing the net with her feet slightly off the ground. She holds her racquet in front of her with both hands. Venus stands closer to the camera at an angle to the net. She has her racquet at her hips in a backhand shot motion. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who is stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and is at an angle to the net. She has her proper right hand holding the racquet and is in a forehand shot motion. Her proper left hand is raised in front of her. Venus stands closer to the camera facing the net and holds her racquet in front of her with both hands. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and is facing the net. She holds her racquet in front of her with both hands. Venus stands closer to the camera and stands at angle to the net. She holds her racquet, in her proper right hand, at her hips in a follow through motion of a backhand shot. Her head is faced down towards the racquet and her moth is open. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and is at an angle to the net. Her proper right hand holds the racquet and is in a forehand shot motion. Her proper left hand is raised out in front of her. Venus stands closer to the camera and is at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in front of her with both hands. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena and Venus #4

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Digital scan of a 35mm black and white negative of Venus, Serena, and Richard Williams on a tennis court. The girls stand in front of their father, Richard Williams, who stands on the court behind them holding a racquet. Serena stands to the right of Venus and faces the net. Her racquet is in front of her and is being held by both her hands. Venus stands slightly in front of Serena and is at an angle to the net. She holds her racquet in both hands in a backhand motion. A tennis ball is in front of her at about her forehead level. All three are wearing matching printed Reebok polo shirts. The girls also have matching skirts. Buildings, other people, and cars are visible in the background of the image.

Serena Williams, Miami Beach 2003

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An image of Serena Williams. The low-angle image features Williams standing in front of an in-ground pool wearing a white bathing suit and heels. She is standing towards the camera, but looking past it, with her hands on her hips.

Sam Rivers, 1973

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Sam Rivers playing saxaphone at a performance in New York City. The photo is taken from an extreme low angle in front of Rivers. He wears a patterned printed shirt and his saxaphone obscures part of his face and body.

Roberta Flack

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photographic portrait of singer Roberta Flack. The portrait is a close up of Flack's face, depicting her from the shoulders up. Flack is angled in the frame, with her chin tilted down and her eyes closed. Her large Afro hairstyle extends beyond the top and right of the image. She wears a dark colored garment with small, light colored, metallic designs embroidered on the shoulders and an open neckline. On the back of the print is the title, date, photographer's signature, and stamp.

Rev. S.S. Jones Home Movies: Reel 8

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm silent, black and white film (a) with original metal film reel (b) and original metal film can (c) featuring footage taken in Oklahoma during the middle and late 1920s by Solomon Sir Jones, the eighth in a collection of nine films.

On the outside of the metal can, handwritten in red ink is [#8] underlined twice, and the '8' is written over in black ink; opposite, also in red ink, is [15]. Handwritten in black ink on a white adhesive label in the center of the can is [Oklahoma Jones].

The film begins with men and women walking down the front stairs of a building. The same men and women are shown in a procession down the road wearing Masonic scarves and aprons. The camera shows the men and women standing in front of the building and also a wider angle view of the entire exterior of the building. There are also about half a dozen cars in front of the building. The next scene shows a motorcade with cars and motorcycles driving down a street. Some of the men on motorcycles appear to have on police officer uniforms. The next scene shows people at a racetrack watching jockeys and horses race. The next scene shows men and women walking out of the front door of a building and passing the camera. The men and women then stand in a semicircle and pose for the camera. The camera pans the crowd, and then they all wave to the camera. The next scene is on a farm. A woman feeds chickens, a man stands nearby with a horse, and another man plays with a pig. There is a brief scene of a woman in a carriage and on a horse. The next scene shows a family get into a car and drive away. There is a brief scene of two men racing, one is dressed in running clothes and the other in semi-formal clothes. In the next scene, a family comes out of a house, acknowledges the camera, and then goes back into the house. There is another scene of a farm that appears to be a different farm than the previous one. There are a lot of pigs in the yard, and a man lets horses out of a barn into the same yard. A car and a truck pass in front of the camera. A woman feeds chickens. There is some brief footage of a gas station and some people greeting one another on front porches at the end of the film.

Reduced Angled Spouted Black Piece

National Museum of African Art
Coiled handbuilt fired clay vessel in the form of a gourd. The body is blackened through a second firing in the reduction atmosphere of a gas kiln. The long, sinuous angled neck has two handles, a pouring lip and a projecting mid-section. The body is large and bulbous and has a signature on the bottom, "Odundo 1990."

Ray Charles - Convention Hall, Atlantic City, N.J. - 1980

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This image depicts musician Ray Charles playing the piano. Wearing a light colored tuxedo with a lighter stripe down the pant leg, a black bow tie, and sunglasses, he sits on a piano bench with a microphone in front of him. His arms are raised to play, but his hands and the majority of the piano is in shadow. Light falls primarily on his face and upper torso, while the rest of the image is in shadow. His face is angled upward and turned slightly towards the microphone.

Randy Weston, 1998

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of jazz musician and composer Randy Weston at a performance in Toronto, Ontario. Westoni s photographed from a slightly low angle and to the right. He is lit from the side and most of the image is in shadow. He wears a patterned collared shirt, sunglasses and cloth hat. He stands with his hands pressed together in front of him.

Queen Ida, 1990

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of zydeco musician Queen Ida playing accordian during a performance in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. She is photographed from a low angle and to her right. She stands in front of a microphone with her left hand held in front of her. She wears a patterned, slightly shiny blouse and dangling earrings.

Plant stand, square, wrought design

Smithsonian Gardens
Square plant stand with two tiers made from wrought iron painted green. The stand is slightly pyramidal, as its legs angle out slightly at the base. The stretchers on each side have three elements with wave pattern. The surface of legs and stretcher elements have a pock-marked hand-tooled texture. There is applied decoration to area between the first shelf and table top. The top is in the shape of foliage, possibly cattails. The foliate motif and the sinuous lines of the stretchers are characteristic of the Art Nouveau style. This plant stand is a mixture between an étagère and a gueridon: a dainty table with an additional shelf for display. This format and the style were both popular in the late nineteenth century.

Plant stand, Rustic

Smithsonian Gardens
Round planter on stand in Rustic Style. The top portion of the planter is made of wood panels, which are flat on the interior and rounded with bark on the exterior. The panels are connected by a ring of rounded sticks, each nailed to two panels at an angle. The ends of the panels are beveled and stained a yellow green. There are three main legs set at angles with thin sticks that go from the top of the stand to the middle. Three arches in the bottom section each made of two bent wood sticks is nailed at the top to the main legs and at the bottom to a stick that joins the legs. Rustic style was immensely popular in the Victorian era, and the height of its popularity occurred between 1840 and 1890. Rustic objects share a common aesthetic of being artfully assembled with materials harvested directly from nature to create a variety of furnishings and decorative objects for the home and garden. Rustic furnishings and accessories were thought to be especially suited to the garden, as they blended in with the natural landscapes. Rustic materials and motifs include tree branches, twigs, roots, burls, bark, pinecones, acorns, seashells, animal horns, and antlers. Rustic designs were often constructed from found objects or were cast or carved to appear like these articles. Rustic objects were usually irregular and asymmetrical to mimic the forms that would occur in nature. Rustic designs could be made following instructions in contemporary publications, but the popularity of the style led to the mass production of Rustic style pieces.
3169-3192 of 3,328 Resources