Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(164)
(262)
(351)
(349)
(402)
(2)
(264)
(148)
(67)
(185)
(72)
(69)

Found 426 Collections

 

WWI: How History Shaped Technology

98 years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. The Wright brothers had only taken to the sky 14 years before, but airplanes still played a vital role in the war effort. Because of the events of WWI, airplane technology developed at an incredible rate. This fast-paced webcast will look at how airplanes changed in this short timeframe, how other technology advanced, and how airplanes were used throughout WWI.

April 8, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Earth Day: A View from Above

The people of Earth didn't see a photo of our planet until the late 1960s. Photos of Earth changed the way we think about our planet. This fast-paced webcast will look at the beginnings of Earth Day and how a better understanding of our place in the universe has evolved through photographic scientific discoveries.

April 22, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Living and Working in Space

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go into space? How about living and working in there? In this program we will explore those questions as well as the benefits and challenges of living and working in space.

May 20, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Time and Navigation

If you want to know where you are, you need a good clock. For centuries sailors have used clocks to locate where they are out at sea. Today we use synchronized clocks and orbiting satellites for location. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll take a look at the challenges of navigating at sea, in the sky, and even in space.

August 26, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Asteroid Redirect Mission

In orbit around the Sun are thousands of asteroids ranging in size from grains of sand to miles across. NASA is planning a mission to capture a piece of an asteroid to be studied by NASA scientists and astronauts. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will learn about asteroids, what we can learn from capturing one, and the technology needed to accomplish such a mission.

September 23, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Milestones of Flight: The Lindberghs

Charles Lindbergh is probably best known for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. However, Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, also reached other milestones in aviation. In 1929 they purchased a Lockheed Sirius airplane and flew it to Asia, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the north. During a trip through Greenland, a native boy gave the Sirius its nickname: Tingmissartoq, meaning "one who flies like a big bird." This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the Lindberghs' aviation-related accomplishments.

January 27, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

WWII and Tuskegee Airmen

Before 1941, there weren't any African American pilots in the United States armed forces. The Tuskegee Airmen changed that. With the United States' entry into World War II imminent, the U.S. Army Air Corps (the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force) decided to offer training to African Americans as pilots and mechanics. Called the Tuskegee Airmen because they trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American military. This episode of STEM in 30 will look at the role African Americans played during the war and how World War II changed aviation history

February 24, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird

Built of titanium, the SR-71 Blackbird is the world's fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird's performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War. In this episode of STEM in 30 we'll feature the SR-71 Blackbird on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center and explore why it was so important for reconnaissance.

March 16, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Apollo

One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind, but in order to take those small steps, it took thousands of people from around the country to develop the tools and technology that got us to the Moon and back. In this episode of STEM in 30 learn about why we went to the Moon, what we accomplished, and what's next.

October 1, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Patent Office

Have you ever had a really great science fair project? Have you invented something? Have you had an idea that would be a great help to you or someone else? If so, you need to learn about patents. Patents help protect unique ideas, like the mousetrap. On this episode of STEM in 30, learn about patents, and how they are used.

September 20, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
7
 

Analyzing Emotions: An Exercise to Develop Emotional Intelligence

The collection includes a chart that briefly informs the viewer of the main areas of the brain and their functions. Also, it includes an image from the movie "Inside Out," to inspire the ways how a person could visualize emotion. The learning objective is for students to be able to have an understanding of what emotions and to become a more positive person. 

1. Go over the definition of emotion and look at the human brain chart to gain general information of the various parts of the brain.

2. On a piece of paper, write down the various emotions that you know and connect them with a personal daily action that you believe is relevant to that emotion (example: feeling happy when your pet greets you at the door). 

3. Using the response from the previous step, write a journal entry reflecting on how your daily negative actions could change and/or how you can continue the positive actions.

4. Use your responses to draw and cut out different  shapes from construction paper that represents your negative and positive emotions. 

4. After completing these steps, speak with a classmate some of the actions you are going to take to be a more positive person. 


Tags: brain; emotions; psychology; analysis

Samantha Castaneda
3
 

The Engineering Behind the World Record Skydive

On October 24, 2014, Alan Eustace set three world records when he jumped from the stratosphere, including highest exit altitude. Achieving this record took a lot of engineering. On this episode of STEM in 30, follow the path of the suit Eustace wore from concept to design and from production to execution.

April 11, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Staying Safe is No Accident The Science of Safety

Do you feel safe when you travel in a car or plane? A lot of engineering and science goes into making sure that the vehicles we use every day are safe and secure. Join STEM in 30 as we take a look at the science of safety.

March 14, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
7
 

What Training Do I Need to Be an Astronaut?

Did you know that training for a spacewalk requires a 6.5 million gallon swimming pool, a team of divers, and a mock-up of the International Space Station? Astronauts have to train for a variety of different jobs they have to do in low Earth orbit. Once on the station, astronauts run science experiments (sometimes on themselves), fix toilets, and run the robotic arm. Do you think you have what takes to complete astronaut training? Find out on this STEM in 30.

February 28, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

The Science of Landing a Really Fast Plane on a Really Big Boat

Landing a plane is difficult under normal circumstances. Imagine landing a super fast plane on a moving runway. Oh, and the runway is also very short! That's what it's like to land on an aircraft carrier. Not only is math and science required to do this, but there’s also the coordination of a massive crew of people who makes it happen. Learn about the math, science, and human element it takes to land on and launch off an aircraft carrier.

January 24, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

The Airplane's Family Tree From the Wright Brothers to Today

Did you know that the parts of airplanes today can be traced directly back to the Wright Flyer and the work of Orville and Wilbur Wright? Join STEM in 30 as we trace the family tree of the airplane from that first flight on December 17, 1903, to today.

December 13, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Meet Orion and SLS, America's Next Great Spacecraft

How are we going to get astronauts to Mars and back safely? How many crew will be making this trip? And how big will this rocket have to be? We will answer these questions and many more as STEM in 30 looks at the Orion, a spacecraft built to take humans farther than they have ever gone before.

November 15, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
7
 

The Psychology of Long Term Space Flight Music, Art and Creature Comforts

If you've ever taken a long trip, you know that bringing your favorite things along will help get you through the journey. The same goes for astronauts in space. Music and the arts entertain them and give them a chance to break away from their demanding schedules. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll dive into how music, art, and creature comforts helps astronauts cope with long-term space travel.

Novermber 1, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
8
 

The Science and Stories of Flying Space Shuttle Discovery

The Space Shuttle Discovery is one of the National Air and Space Museum's key artifacts. The longest-serving orbiter, Discovery flew 39 times -- more missions than any of its sister ships. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will look at the science behind flying the space shuttle and explore the stories of those who flew on her.

October 18, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Solar Eclipse Special: Live from the Path of Totality

A total solar eclipse will sweep across America on August 21, 2017. Tune in to STEM in 30 as we celebrate the Great American Eclipse live from Liberty, Missouri, which is on the Path of Totality. This means that the total solar eclipse will be viewable, weather permitting, and we’ll be there to show it as it happens. We will also be live from the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, answering FAQs about eclipses.

August 21, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Rocket Chemistry: A Ride to Space

This collection explores the rockets NASA used during the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs, as well as some novel designs and propellants for use in future rocket systems.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
19
 

Second Opinion: Forging the Future – Smithsonian Resources

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains interdisciplinary education resources, including student interactives, videos, images and blogs to complement the Smithsonian's national conversation on global climate change, highlighted on Second Opinion. Use this sample of the Smithsonian's many resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic and spark a conversation.

Ashley Naranjo
29
 

Exploring Scientific Innovation: Process, Product and Impact.

This collection consists of  three activities exploring different aspects of invention.  Students are invited to examine how inventions are linked, the impact of innovation on society, and the ethical implications of innovation.  Although designed to work as a unit, the lessons can be used individually.

Guiding Questions: What factors influence innovation in science? How do humans use science ? To what extent is science a group or individual process? Are all discoveries good or can they have a potentially negative effect?

In the first activity, students consider the process of invention by looking closely at images of inventions and exploring the connections between them. Students might consider which object was invented first, the microscope or the spectacles or investigate the relationship between glass, the telephone and the computer.

Students then view the short video on the manufacture of fiberglass, which looks at the process of innovating the glass manufacturing industry and the social and economic factors that propelled the invention of fiberglass. 

Time: 50 minutes.

Building on the student’s earlier thinking about innovation, in this activity they explore how new inventions shape our understanding of our world and their impact on our daily life.  Students are invited to explore images from artwork, advertisements, and leaflets and explain what each reveals about our changing world in both positive and negative ways.

This activity can be done individually, in pairs or in small groups followed by whole class sharing.

Time: 50 minutes, depending on the number of images explored.

The final activity delves into the ethics of invention and innovation, taking a broader look at the purposes and intended/unintended consequences of progress. This activity could also form  the basis for further research into other inventions and their implications.

 Time: 30-minutes

 

 

 

Lisa Holden
28
 

Charles Messier: Comet Ferret

Charles Messier was an eighteenth century astronomer whose specialty was searching for comets. He observed at an observatory atop the Hotel Cluny which was financed by the French Navy.

Arthur Glaser
24
265-288 of 426 Collections