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Found 893 Collections

 

Santa Claus: Comparing Evolving Imagery and Text

This collection gathers depictions of Santa Claus from ads, paintings, photographs, stamps from 1837 to today. Also, includes analyses of his evolving image from the Smithsonian Magazine and the National Museum of American History blog. How does the description of Santa in the Christmas poem, "A Visit from St. Nicholas" compare with the images that follow? Includes a discussion question extension: How might you revamp Christmas stories to better reflect the time and country that you live in?

Keywords: Saint Nicholas, holidays, poetry

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Salem Witch Trails (VoiceOver)

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

Deyna Cruz Hernandez Period:01

Deyna Cruz
7
 

Running Fence

This teaching collection includes images and video of Running Fence, a work of installation art by Christo and Jean Claude. Included at the end is a lesson plan that engages students in analysis of Running Fence and details the steps for a student-designed installation art work at their school.

Learning goals include:
• Define installation art
• Analyze the process and results of the work of Jean-Claude and Christo to develop Running Fence
• Use the design process to develop a proposal for an installation art piece
• Use persuasive speaking skills to pitch your plan to the relevant stakeholders in your school community
• Plan and execute a piece of installation art on your school grounds, working cooperatively with a team
Kate Harris
46
 

Runaway in an Unknown Land: The Underground Railroad in Western Pennsylvania

Prior to the Civil War, enslaved people had little chance of securing their freedom. There were rare cases of freedom being purchased by the enslaved individual or by some benefactor. Even rarer was the granting of freedom papers by the master. For those who desired to taste freedom, the choice of running was often the only viable choice. Runaways faced incredible dangers en route including the possibility of capture.
Arthur Glaser
29
 

Rosa and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

A look at the Montgomery Bus Boycott through Rumbaugh's sculpture of Rosa Parks.  A deep look at the characterization of the three figures through the lens of literary analysis.  Students will use the sculpture as a jumping board into literacy activities.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 


#NPGteach

Kelly McGuire
23
 

Romanticism & Renaissance Literary Period (American Literature - 10th grade)

This collection is used to help launch the Romanticism Unit for a 10th grade American Literature course. The paintings were selected for their potential to inspire conversations about various historical events, social, intellectual, and political movements which helped prompt a tremendous growth in American literature during the period between 1800 and the start of Civil War (approximately 1860's). Each work of art compliments at least one work of literature we will discuss during this time period.  Students are encouraged during class discussions to access prior knowledge of this time period, based upon what they have learned in their 10th grade U.S. History class. A one to two day lesson using this collection, and culminating in a writing assignment, follows. (See "Notes to Other Users" for further description of lesson.)

#SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
19
 

Roll of Thunder

Katie Cahill
2
 

Richard Wright: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Richard Wright, an American author whose works investigate the toll that racial prejudice exerted on society. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created (such as the stamp, etc.).
  • Having read one of his stories, does the portrait capture your image of Richard Wright? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Richard Wright, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: mississippi, ms, writer, native son

Tess Porter
6
 

Rhea's Letters: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool Award.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Revolutionary War

This collection was created for the purpose of immersing my fifth grade social studies students in a world of artifacts that they would otherwise not have had the opportunity to see. My students lack exposure and background knowledge centered around the arts. Most of them would never have the opportunity to view these artifacts in person. Having this collection and abundance of  options to integrate into my curriculum opens a world of opportunities! #pzpgh

Jamie Chambers
29
 

Reviewing Literary Devices Through Observation of American Art

This collection will support students in identifying and creating effective literary devices, as a review, in preparation for an upcoming poetry unit. Students will begin with a See-Think-Wonder activity, followed by a quick write, a review of five literary devices (diction, imagery, metaphor, simile, and tone), and ending with a small group See-Think-Wonder activity and the creation of sentences based on the images using the literary devices listed above. 

Pieces included:

  1. Thomas Moran, The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, 1872
  2. Thomas Moran, The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, 1893-1901
  3. Thomas Moran, The Chasm of the Colorado, 1873-1874
  4. Thomas Moran, Mist in Kanab Canyon, Utah, 1892
  5. Thomas Doughty, River View with Hunters and Dogs, ca. 1850
  6. Asher B. Durand, Woodland Glen, ca. 1850-1855
  7. Frederic Edwin Church, Aurora Borealis, 1865

#SAAMteach

Charlene Harper
11
 

Resources List: Asian Americans in Cleveland

This collection includes resources presented at the November 16, 2018 Educator Workshop at the Cleveland History Center of the Western Reserve Historical Society.

#APA2018   

Mary Manning
70
 

Resources for Teaching African-American History

A collection of teaching resources about African-American history, from slavery to modern-day. This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. This collection will be updated frequently and includes both individual artifacts and lesson plans.

Kate Harris
38
 

Requiem of Love

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

Bryan Chavez-Kelly
7
 

Represent!

This playlist on symbolism and representation of the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create original work in the format of their choosing that demonstrates understanding of United States symbolism.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
57
 

Remembering Dr. King: Six American Artists Respond

April 4, 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. These six artworks from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection were created between 1968 and 1996, and respond to Dr. King's legacy in different ways. What does the date of each artwork tell us about the context during which it was made? What can we learn from looking at them as a collection?

Created for a March 1, 2018 webinar for alumni of SAAM's Summer Institutes: Teaching the Humanities through Art.  

https://americanart.si.edu/edu... 

#saamteach #martinlutherkingjr #mlk

Phoebe Hillemann
6
 

Reconstruction

Students analyze works of art from the end of the Civil War and Reconstruction to better understand this tumultous time in our nation's history.
Nick Odem
3
 

Recognizing the American Dream Lesson


#SAAMteach

Maria Ryan
6
 

Rebels and Beats

This topical collection is based on a past exhibit in the National Portrait Gallery entitled Rebels and Beats: Painters and Poets of the 1950s. This collection might be used by teachers or students who want to explore the counterculture of the 1950s, a time period typically associated with conformity. The collection includes paintings, photographs, and videos related to the writers and artists involved in the Beat Generation, San Francisco Renaissance, Black Mountain College, and New York School scenes.

In what ways did these artists challenge the social norms of the time? Why is art often a means of challenging the status quo?

tags: Ginsberg, Kerouac, Ferlinghetti, de Kooning, Baraka, poem, counterculture, Beat Movement

Susan Ogilvie
43
 

Rebels and Beats

This topical collection is based on a past exhibit in the National Portrait Gallery entitled Rebels and Beats: Painters and Poets of the 1950s. This collection might be used by teachers or students who want to explore the counterculture of the 1950s, a time period typically associated with conformity. The collection includes paintings, photographs, and videos related to the writers and artists involved in the Beat Generation, San Francisco Renaissance, Black Mountain College, and New York School scenes.

In what ways did these artists challenge the social norms of the time? Why is art often a means of challenging the status quo?

tags: Ginsberg, Kerouac, Ferlinghetti, de Kooning, Baraka, poem, counterculture, Beat Movement

Kate Harris
44
 

Rebel Without A Cause/ Fruitvale Station

This is my collection of images that connect with this film pairing,

ms.hughesteachesenglish
43
 

Reading/ELA: Setting

Christina Ratatori
15
 

Reading/ELA: Characters

Story Elements | Story Starters

Christina Ratatori
16
265-288 of 893 Collections