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Found 373 Collections

 

Destination Moon: EO 10925, Civil Rights, and the Space Program

This collection of resources uses oral histories as well as photographs and articles to explore race relations and the impact of Executive Order 10925 at NASA. Signed by President John F. Kennedy on March 6, 1961, EO 10925 required government contractors to "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin."

Resources in this collection -  photographs and articles as well as oral histories - are compiled to supplement the SITES traveling exhibit Destination Moon. This collection is not comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection is closely associated with the "Destination Moon" traveling exhibit. For more information see https://airandspace.si.edu/exh...



Christina Ferwerda
10
 

China's Terracotta Army: Info and Teaching

This collection contains information and teaching resources on the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta figures created for the tomb complex of China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). Resources in this collection cover a wide range of topics, including: the discovery of the Terracotta Army, Emperor Qin Shihuang, the unification of China, Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) spiritual beliefs, how the terracotta warriors were made, the different types of terracotta warriors, and the types of bronze weaponry found in the Terracotta Army pits. This collection also contains three interactives: a timeline of ancient Chinese history, a map of the tomb complex, and maps of battle formations in the Terracotta Army pits.

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history.  They are some of the greatest tools researchers have to understand the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; religion; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world history; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Shyra Dawson
33
 

America support for the French in World War 2 #TeachingInquiry

This collection focuses on the time when America joined with the Allies to defeat Germany in World War 2. 

My compelling question is: What impact did the arrival of the Americans have in the occupied villages in France in World War 2?

Ros Mattner
8
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences

This topical collection includes articles and videos about Japanese American experiences in incarceration camps.  The collection highlights four individuals and their stories: Fred Korematsu, a civil rights activist; Minoru Yasui, a lawyer and civil rights advocate; Norman Mineta, a politician who grew up in the camps; and Isamu Noguchi, an artist who self-deported himself to an incarceration camp. Other important articles and videos about inmate experiences are located at the end. This collection is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp LifeJapanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents, and Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii

#APA2018

Tess Porter
30
 

Asian Pacific American Authors

This topical collection about Asian Pacific American authors includes portraits, interviews, and book reviews. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

Keywords: Jhumpa Lahiri, Indian American, Carlos Bulosan, America is in the Heart, Filipino American, Maxine Hong Kingston, Chinese American, Julie Otsuka, Japanese American, Chang-rae Lee, Korean American, Anor Lin, Sadakichi Hartmann, A.X. Ahmad, Ava Chin, P. S. Duffy, Eddie Huang, Yiyun Li, Valynne Maetani, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Vietnamese American, Ellen Oh, Vu Tran, Thrity Umrigar, literature

#APA2018

Tess Porter
28
 

Objects of Leisure: Children's Toys from 1750-1899

This exhibit showcases objects of leisure, focusing on children's toys like wooden wagons and paper dolls. These artifacts depict evolving themes of childhood and growth in North America from the mid-18th to the late-19th centuries. These material objects established and enforced the traditional gender roles of the time periods during which they were created. Toymakers often targeted specific younger audiences, catering their designs to whichever gender was socially suited to the toy. Toys were either made by artisanal third parties who were paid for their products or were constructed by individuals from objects that were had on-hand within the home. The toys educated young children in socially accepted gender roles, assigning girls to feminine notions of domesticity and modesty, while resigning boys to more masculine pursuits of rough play and control-seeking. By analyzing these artifacts and material objects, present day historians and audiences alike can become better informed about past sociocultural trends and gender roles, making for a more informed public. This can allow modern viewers to better contextualize historical subjects.

Anna Kosub
11
 

Women and Sewing in the Revolutionary Era

Among the many purposes art fulfills, it can convey a message, allow self-expression, and indicate a way of life. In the Revolutionary War era, while boys were taught traditional knowledge (much like today), girls were instructed in the arts--including sewing.1 This medium helped women contribute to their home as well as communicated thoughts and emotions of them and their country.

The art of sewing was used in practical manners through household items like quilts and bed coverings, giving a picture of normal life. Even the decorative works were practical; Education accessible only for the rich, the art was displayed in houses to show off their wealth and skill in order to attract suitors. It also conveyed values about religion and family, with passages and pictures, helping people in their time--and ours--understand their thoughts that otherwise would have gone unacknowledged. Some women even professionally embroidered to exchange it for money and goods, giving some financial independence in a time of assumed submission. 1

American culture also form into what it is today through these creations. Using stylized images, they created the picture of a patriot, dictating to the nation what a true American looks like and promoting the war effort. It showed what the country was as well as what it could be. In a time of adjustment and confusion, it gave the nation a direction of how to live.

Sewing gave a voice to the voiceless and helped define a woman's traditional role in American society. From the practical household items to a platform to display their personality, it gave them an outlet to educate and express themselves, giving them a way to participate and contribute to the country.

The first article is an embroidery frame. This was used to hold embroidery in place when creating. It is what opened the door for so many women to learn this skill and create a whole new influence in America.

The second article listed, called Sweet Sampler, is an example of what a girl would learn to do in school. This was made by an 13-year-old. A simple scene with just , this shows the beginning of a hard-to-attain education and the seeds of what grew into a popular form of expression.

The third article shows a quilt, one example of a household item done by sewing. Though the creator had no kids, it shows how the skill could be used practically to keep a family warm.

The fourth article is a coverlet (bedspread). Its design was inspired by Indian bed hangings, showing how American culture is influenced by outsiders-- and shaped by it-- through this medium. It is yet another example of how sewing was applied in basic items.

The fifth article, a pair of decorated shoes, was the only one I found of its kind. It was designed after German trends; this is another sample of other nations' influences on America, creating what is considered "American" today. In addition, it shows another use for sewing and embroidery.

Article six is a woman's stylized sampler tracking her genealogy. This is an example of work done with sewing to attract suitors and display wealth and education. It showcases what is considered "good" values through this display, giving a hint to the culture at the time.

Article seven demonstrates religious virtues. This perpetuates the cultural religious emphasis at the time, especially among the elite. This is yet another indication of American culture and also shows the woman's values-- a detail we otherwise wouldn't have known about.

Article eight, along with the rest following it, are more professional. Made with embroidery thread, it depicts a pleasant rural life, giving an idea of what was considered ideal life (for an elite, at least). The artist clearly had to develop this skill with the very little independence they were given.

Article nine's details were done using needlework. The artist depicted a woman flying an American flag in a picturesque setting. This became "a symbol of liberty to Americans during the Revolutionary War period" (National Museum of American History).

The final article depicts Liberty with armor and "a boy and girl looking toward a distance hilltop" (National Museum of American History). There are national emblems and symbols included, showing this picture is patriotic. This is yet another example of women influenced (as well as influencing) nationalism and the American war effort.

Shira Solomon
10
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects

This topical collection includes objects used by inmates in Japanese American Incarceration camps.  It is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp LifeJapanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents, and Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion; for example, what types of objects inmates created during their incarceration and why they created these objects. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii, gaman

#APA2018 

Tess Porter
42
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents

This topical collection includes yearbooks, magazines, letters, official announcements, and other important documents from the Japanese American Incarceration era.  It is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp Life, Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects, and Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion; for example, what documents reveal about the restrictions placed on Japanese American families while they were incarcerated. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii, rohwer center high school yearbook, magazine, newsletter, isamu noguchi, calendar

Tess Porter
51
 

Mardi Gras

For teaching about Mari Grass and the history of the Acadians.
Carol Goldie
17
 

Smithsonian and the Twenty-First Century Museum: Leadership Strategies - Week 1 Images

This collection supports the Week 1 lecture for the Harvard Extension School course MUSE E-200 Smithsonian and the Twenty-First Century Museum: Leadership Strategies. This first lecture is titled Introduction and History of Building a National Museum.

#MUSE200 #HES

Alison Leithner
42
 

Conflict and Compromise: The Vietnam War

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2018, "Conflict and Compromise in History."

These resources - including protest posters, archival photographs, interviews, artwork, and articles - explore the topic of the Vietnam War from multiple perspectives. Resources highlight politics, the experience of soldiers, anti-war protests, and artwork created in reaction to the Vietnam War. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2018. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2018 in the description!

Tags: ho chi-minh; lyndon b. johnson; richard nixon; walter cronkite; henry kissinger; veteran; oral history; viet cong; protest; peace; 50s; 60s; 70s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD

Susan Ogilvie
84
 

Rebels and Beats

This topical collection is based on a past exhibit in the National Portrait Gallery entitled Rebels and Beats: Painters and Poets of the 1950s. This collection might be used by teachers or students who want to explore the counterculture of the 1950s, a time period typically associated with conformity. The collection includes paintings, photographs, and videos related to the writers and artists involved in the Beat Generation, San Francisco Renaissance, Black Mountain College, and New York School scenes.

In what ways did these artists challenge the social norms of the time? Why is art often a means of challenging the status quo?

tags: Ginsberg, Kerouac, Ferlinghetti, de Kooning, Baraka, poem, counterculture, Beat Movement

Susan Ogilvie
43
 

Access Series: Nostalgic Popular "Pop" Culture 1950s-2000s

This inspiration collection of nostalgic popular "pop" culture from the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s—super heroes and super villains, Muppets, cartoon characters, Star Wars, Disney and Pixar characters, Transformers, and movies was used for a collage activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity, "Me & My World: Personal Ecology/Interest Inventory" with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students were asked about their favorite pop culture influences from the past and present. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for a discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Susan Ogilvie
97
 

The 1960s--A Decade Collection

This is a topical collection about American life and politics in the 1960s. Resources in this collection might be helpful to students and teachers working on projects about the decade. It is not meant to be completely comprehensive, but rather includes highlights of the Smithsonian's collection spanning art, popular culture, social trends, leadership, and technology.

Teachers and students might copy and adapt this collection to suit their needs; highlighting a specific aspect of life in the 1960s and adding annotations and additional resources.

tags: Sixties, Kennedy, Camelot, civil rights, Vietnam, politics, decade

Susan Ogilvie
97
 

Expressive Self Portrait

Art 3 students will compare the elements and principles in each image and distinguish their aesthetic qualities of expression. 

Jinni Copp
15
 

Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) The Will to Adorn

 
The Will to Adorn is a multi-year collaborative folk cultural research and public presentation project initiated by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.This project explores the diversity of African American identities as expressed through the cultural aesthetics and traditional arts of the body, dress, and adornment.

Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, CA was one of the participant museums in the 2017 The Will to Adorn project. Six high school students examined African-American fashion in the San Francisco Bay Area. 

Through a combination of street photography, museum visits, field trips and interviews with Bay Area fashion creators and trend setters we took a closer look at the different ways African-American fashion is expressed.

This is a collection of their photographs curated by the program coordinator.



Richard Collins
90
 

The Civil War

Examine artifacts from 1861-1865 and use them to help prepare your own scrapbook of the time period.

msyorio
162
 

Destination Moon: Origins of the Space Race

This topical collection introduces events that shaped the origin of the Space Race; its connections to World War II, rocketry, nuclear development, and the Cold War. 

After exploring the collection, students will have a better understanding of how the Space Race evolved from a specific group of geopolitical events. This collection introduces figures from American politics and outlines international events that pushed the United States to  mobilize around the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs. 

Students begin by watching the overview video. The resources that follow include metadata summaries, quiz questions, and hotspots to draw attention to details in each resource, and provide an overview of the complex geopolitical situation. This collection is best used as a primer to the space race and could be enhanced by further discussion. 

Christina Ferwerda
14
 

Destination Moon: The Mighty Saturn V

The Saturn V is the most powerful rocket flown to date, but how did it actually work? this collection investigates the three stages of the Saturn V rocket, as well as the Instrument Unit. By making comparisons between the engines and computer located on the Saturn V and familiar technologies, students will gain a better understanding of the power and function of the mighty Saturn V. 

This collection also uses and familiarizes students with several Earth and Space science terms. When exploring this collection, discuss and provide students with the following vocabulary list: 

Thrust, stage, orbit, velocity, combustion, vacuum

Christina Ferwerda
9
 

Examining Icebergs (MC IERW002 - Our Vulnerable Planet Essay)

What can we learn about global climate change by examining icebergs? This collection includes resources (pictures, articles, and videos)  that give more insight on the effects of global warming on icebergs.  The video and articles will provide you with more background knowledge on the subject.  

tags: climate change, global warming, iceberg, glacier, melt, temperature, environment

readandwrite
6
 

Exploring Portraits of African Americans with the Harmon Foundation Collection

The Harmon Foundation Collection, one of the treasures of the National Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection, comprises a group of more than forty portraits of prominent African Americans. The portraits were part of an unprecedented attempt in the 1940s and 1950s to counter racist stereotypes and racial prejudice through portraiture.

#NPGteach

Briana White
43
 

Conflict and Compromise: People of the Vietnam Era

The Vietnam Era is rife with people of controversy and topics worth studying. This collection aims to introduce individuals who played a role in both conflict and compromise during that era.  It is not a complete list of every person, but rather a diving off point to get the discussion started.  (http://www.vvmf.org/teaching-t...) #NHD2018 #NHD

  

Callie Wright
20
 

Robots

Lesson Prompt: Look at each robot and imagine what it can do. How can it help people? If you were to design your own robot, what would you want it to do to help your family? Sketch your ideas and then draw your robot design.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
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