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Found 2,802 Resources

Tubatulabal Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:JPH Note

SEE TUB 0015; 0016; 0017; 0019

Aluminum disc

Tubatulabal Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:JPH Note

SEE TUB 0013; 0014; 0016; 0017; 0018

Aluminum disc

Tubatulabal Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:JPH Note

SEE TUB 0013: 0015

Aluminum disc

Tubatulabal Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:JPH Note

SEE TUB 0006; 0008

Aluminum disc

Tubatulabal Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:JPH Note

SEE TUB 0010; 0011; 0012; 0014; 0015

Aluminum disc

Two lectures about Korea to Smithsonian Associates, 1967 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Tape 1, Lecture to Smithsonian Associates by Eugene Knez Oct. 30, 1967, his first lecture on Korea. Tape 2, Lecture for S.I. Associates, Nov. 6, 1967, by Dr. E. Knez, his second lecture on Korea.

Under Pressure

National Air and Space Museum

Want to know what it’s like in outer space? Your best bet is under the sea. Life on a deep-space mission may be a lot like life in a deep-sea submersible, and the extreme environments found on the sea floor may give us clues as to where to look for life on other planets. In this episode, Emily, Matt, and Nick talk deep-sea diving, marine microbes, prog rock, and Emily’s favorite – ocean worlds. Guests include oceanographer and microbiologist Dr. Julie Huber of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik.

Unidentified miscellaneous songs and gabbang, circa 1965-1967 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Track information transcribed from list provided by H. Arlo Nimmo.

Update: Meet the New Voice of Season Four!

Smithsonian Institution

With our fourth season’s launch quickly approaching, take a moment to meet the new voice of Sidedoor!

Season Four of the Smithsonian's Sidedoor podcast launches on June 12, 2019. Subscribe now!

Update: Passing the Mic!

Smithsonian Institution

Our dear host Tony Cohn is leaving *Sidedoor *to travel the world, so we want to take a minute to introduce you to the new voice of the show, Haleema Shah.

Varina H. Davis portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Margaret Vining, National Museum of American History curator, talks about Varina H. Davis (1826-1906), first lady of the Confederacy.

Various songs and instrumental music, including some from a Quapaw Pow-wow 1960-1961 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Recorded in Mayetta, Kansas

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

MPM tape 5 includes: Side One. 1. Flute Melodies (played and sung), by Curtis Pequano (Prairie band, Potawatomi); 2. Winnebago Love Song, by Charles Harrison; 3. Flute Melodies (played and sung), by Curtis Pequano; 4. Round Dance Songs, by Curtis Pequano; 5. Sawanoge Dance Songs; 6. Moccasin Game Songs; 7. Cherokee Dance Songs, by Bill Shawnee, Randy Carpenter (Shawnee tribe), and Sadie Weller (Caddo tribe) [recorded in Turkey Ford, Oklahoma]; 8. Oklahoma Stomp Songs, by Jack King (Oneida); 9. Quapaw pow-wow. Side Two. 1. Stomp Dance contest; 2. Quapaw pow-wow; 3. Miscellaneous Songs (love songs/dance songs), by James Wahbnosh (Prairie band, Potawatomi).

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Sides 1 and 2: Translating Ventureño into English.

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Discs were originally housed in the National Archives as part of Record Group 106 (Records of the Smithsonian Institution, 1871-1952). On March 18, 2005, they were returned to the Smithsonian Institution as SIA Acc. 05-142 and in 2010 the records were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives and added to the J.P. Harrington Collection.

Shellac disc

Side 1: "First verse of Hiawatha in Chumash Dialect, translated by Candelaria from Spanish into Ventureno Indian dialect, written by Georgia Henley, December 15, 1912"; man translating Ventureño into English. Side 2: man translating Ventureño into English.

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Sides 1 and 2: Translating Ventureño into English.

Ventureño and Island Chumash Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Side 1: Man translating Ventureño into English; Side 2: Vocabulary with Santa Cruz dialect to English, given to man by Mr. Callenburg/Cowdenburg in employ of the Smithsonian Institute, to compare with Ventureño (audio speeds up throughout side)

Vernon Jordan, Living Self-Portrait

National Portrait Gallery
Interview with Vernon Jordan, Civil Rights Leader

Vietnamese songs and instrumental music [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Information transcribed from box: Side I stereo 3 3/4 ;1. Jerai Gongs (moving past mikes 0-73; 2. Jerai gongs (with singing at 150, 73-214; 3. Jerai zylophone 214-246; 4. Jerai violin 246-276 5. Jerai man singing 278-301; 6. Jerai group singing 303-362. Side 2 Vietnamese song (co Nhat) 1. 600- First with guitar accom. Second, third with 10 stringed inst.; 2. Vietnamese Modern -881. Side 2 BLANK

Visionary modernist impresario : a look at Arthur B. Davies and his world, 1900-1928 : panel discussion, 1981 March 27

Archives of American Art
3 sound cassettes. A panel discussion conducted 1981 March 27, sponsored jointly by the Archives of American Art and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston.
The participants are: Robert F. Brown, Charles Eldredge, Elizabeth Johns, Garnett McCoy, Nancy Miller, Gwendolyn Owens, and Elizabeth Sussman.

Volta Laboratory Experimental Recording

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C., on 11 March 1885. The recording process involved focusing a beam of light, projecting it through a liquid, and causing sound waves to interrupt both the light and the liquid to expose a prepared photographic plate. The recording, which starts at the center and spirals outward, is of variable density, that is the areas of exposure vary in density according to volume and pitch of the sound recorded. Process is described in U.S. Patent 341,213 awarded Alexander Graham Bell, Chichester A. Bell, and Charles Sumner Tainter on 4 May 1886. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2011. Content summary: “Mary had a little lamb” Content transcript (37 seconds): “ [?]…Sumner Tainter and H. G. Rogers. This eleventh day of March, eighteen hundred and eighty-five. [trilled r sound] [indistinct phrase] Mary had a little lamb, and its fleece was white as snow [alternatively, black as soot?] . And wherever Mary went…Oh [indistinct word]. Mary had a little lamb, and its fleece was white as snow [alternatively, black as soot?]. And wherever Mary went, the little lamb was sure to go. How is this for high? [trill]” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79. Steven E. Schoenherr, “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone,” Wile, Raymond R. "The Development of Sound Recording at the Volta Laboratory," Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal 21, No. 2, 1990, pp. 208-225.

Volta Laboratory Experimental Sound Recording, Green Wax on Brass Disc

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C., about 1884. The wax, poured into a brass holder, has been dyed a bright green. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2011. Content summary: Hamlet’s soliloquy Content transcript (17 seconds): “To be, or not to be: that is the question. Whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing end them? To die, to sleep…” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79. Steven E. Schoenherr, “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone,” Wile, Raymond R. "The Development of Sound Recording at the Volta Laboratory," Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal 21, No. 2, 1990, pp. 208-225.
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