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National Museum of American History

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National Museum of American History

Pilot Motor Car Company Radiator Emblem

National Museum of American History
This radiator emblem belonged to a Pilot automobile manufactured by the Pilot Motor Car Company of Richmond, Indiana between 1909 and 1924. The Pilot was an assembled car, and was available in a variety of body models selling from $1500 to $3000. The emblem reads “RICHMOND/PILOT/INDIANA.”

Radiator emblems are small, colorful metal plates bearing an automobile manufacturer's name or logo that attached to the radiators grilles of early automobiles. Varying in shape and size, the emblems served as a small branding device, sometimes indicating the type of engine, place of manufacturing, or using an iconic image or catchy slogan to advertise their cars make and model. This emblem is part of the collection that was donated by Hubert G. Larson in 1964.

They Give Their Lives...

National Museum of American History

A Rustic Genji (Inaka Genji)

National Museum of American History
Japanese wood block print. Landscape with two kimono-clad female figures in foreground; men engaged in agricultural activities in background with waterwheel. Left-hand print in a triptych with GA 03213 and GA 03215. 24 separate impressions were required to complete the image from 14 printing surfaces on eight blocks, of which this is the 6th progressive proof, adding gray details to landscape.

Did Edvard Munch Find a Supernatural Power in Color?

Smithsonian Magazine
A new exhibition at the National Gallery of Art places Munch’s palette in context

Hieronymi Cardani, præstantissimi mathematici, philosophi, ac medici Artis magnæ, sive, De regulis algebraicis ..

Smithsonian Libraries
Imprint from colophon.

Also available online.

Stationer's label: C.E. Rappaport, Roma.

Dibner gift.

Elecresource

Gate of the Highlands [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title transcribed from negative.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Glass, BW.

Village Scene

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Toothbrushes #2

Smithsonian American Art Museum

[Greystone] [slide]

Archives of American Gardens
The Eagle's Nest was an overlook, constructed of rock, with a view over the property of the Hudson. An elaborate rock garden was also constructed around the tall overlook. In early years, it may have once contained a small greek temple; in later years, a cast stone and ironwork pergolas structure later appeared in this location, and remains there today. Rock garden with daffodils.

Transkei Women

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Transkei Women, 1947. Two women are sitting in the grass talking. One woman's back is facing the camera. The blanket she is wearing is decorated with beads and coins.They are also wearing large head wraps, jewelry, skirts, and long tops. There are some women standing and sitting in the background. This takes place after the Sunday morning beer drinking. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1947.

In 1947, Constance Staurt Larrabee visited the Transkei. She was there researching the housing problems in Southern Africa.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Father Huddleston With Children

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Father Huddleston With Children, 1948. Photographic image of Father Huddleston standing in front of a group of young children. He is reaching out to touch one of the girl's faces. His school building is behind him. The following is from Constance Stuart's notes: "Father Huddleston is a well-known and beloved figure in the native district of Sophiatown where he runs a mission school for children from kindergarten to high school." Later in his life he became the president of the Anti-Apartheid Movement and was involved in many rallies to end apartheid in South Africa. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1948.

In 1945, Constance Stuart returned from her assignment as the first female South African war correspondent in World War II. Her reputation as a photographer grew. She maintained a photographic studio in Pretoria and Johannesburg. This series of images which she entitled "Johannesburg Black Man" depict life in downtown Johannesburg and in parts of the city, where Black South Africans lived, such as Sophiatown, Pimville, and Newclare. A second series of images focuses on Father Huddleston's work in Sophiatown. In 1948-1949, in the early days of apartheid, Stuart documented the building of the South Western townships (Soweto) and the way Africans adjusted to this new environment.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Kimberley Mine Managers and Miner

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Kimberley Mine Managers and Miner, 1948. Photographic image of a two men of European decent, who are manangers of the mine, who are standing to either side of three black South African miners. Two of them are covered in white dust. The miner on the far right is holding a large piece of hard "blue ground" from which diamonds are excavated. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1948.

Constance Stuart pursued her career as a photojournalist. In 1948, she went on a photographic assignment to Kimberley, the center of South African diamond mining in the Northern Cape Province. She captured images of the town, the De Beers Consolidated Mines, and of independent prospectors, who looked for diamonds to make their fortune.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

The Moment, from the portfolio Four on Plexiglas

Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Witch

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Study for Two Open Rectangles Excentric

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Viejo Campesino

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Congo Français [postcard] : Congo Français - Usine et Bureaux de la Société Générale des Procédés d'extraction de Caoutchouc, Avenue Félix-Faure, à Brazzaville

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Postcard caption.

Image indexed by negative number.

Translated caption reads: ''French Congo. General Company of the extraction rubber methods, factory and offices, Félix-Faure in Brazzaville''. In the foreground, from left to right, fences protecting the hutments. In the background rubber trees. Recto stamp postmarked reads: ''Congo Français. 09.?06.'' Verso address reads: '' Monsieur André Edgard a Loukoléla - Congo Français''. Congo Français. Photograph by J. Audema

At Albertville [graphic] : Judge Gorlia's daughter

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Archives staff; title not provided by photographer.

Judge E. Gorlia's last journey in the Belgian Congo from March 1926 to December 1928.

Albertville was founded as fortified post in 1901. It is the chief port on the western shore of lake Tanganyika and is the administrative center of the district of Tanganyika in Elisabeth province. The port is built on the point of land which forms the southern extremity of Lukuga bay while the town is built on a hill-side overlooking the lake.

Men's secret society erecting ajaba dressing house of Amozo ward, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.

Donated by Simon Ottenberg, 2000.

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original title reads, "Young adult and older boy men's society members building up and decorating the ajaba roofless high walled site where masqueraders will dress and undress during masquerade season, roughly October - March (dry season). Mgbom Village, each ward has its own ajaba. Amebo (Amozo ?) ward young age grades erecting the walls of the structure." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"Ajaba is a roofless dressing house found in each common in villages belonging to the Itim subgroup of Afikpo. The house is used for changing into costumes for public plays and dances of the village secret society." [Ottenberg S., 1971: Leadership and Authority in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].

Ori players coming out and dancing at the Okumkpa performance, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.

Donated by Simon Ottenberg, 2000.

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Dancers." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all players are society members, and all wear wooden masks and costumes." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].

The photograph depicts ori players coming out and dancing. They are the principal actors in the skits. They also come out and dance as individuals between some of the events. The ori are active singers in the chorus. They are experienced players, as a rule, having taken part in previous performances.

Line of players costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims in the njenji parade at Ezi Nwachi compound, Ndibe Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.

Donated by Simon Ottenberg, 2000.

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].

King Sneferu's pyramid, Meidum Pyramid, Egypt, [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

During his trip to Egypt, Elisofon visited Ahrāmāt Maydūm, site of a monumental structure believed to have been built by King Sneferu; originally was a smooth-sided, true geometric pyramid, although in its present ruined condition (lacking facing stones) it appears to be a three-stepped pyramid. [The J. P. Getty Fund: Thesaurus of Geographical Names]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was working on "The Nile" project and traveled to Africa from March 14, 1961 to March 31, 1961, visiting Egypt.
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