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Found 335 Resources

Oral history interview with Guy and Genoi Pettit Maccoy, 1965 July 24

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 40 p.

An interview of Guy and Genoi Pettit Maccoy conducted, 1965 July 24, by Betty Hoag, in Chatsworth, Calif., for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.

Photograph of Ralph Stackpole with Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm. Ralph Stackpole sits left of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in his stoneyard at Hotaling Place, San Francisco. The photograph was taken in 1931 but the photographer is unknown.
Item should be viewed with Digital Item ID# 19801, Emmy Lou Packard's notes about the photograph, which explain its provenance.

Oral history interview with Buckley Mac-Gurrin, 1964 June 20

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 36 p.

An interview of Buckley Mac-Gurrin conducted 1964 June 20, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art, in his home, in El Monte, Calif.

Frida and Diego at lunch in Coyoacan

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 28 x 27 cm. (image), 36 x 28 cm. (sheet) Identification on verso (handwritten): #3 for Mildred Cousadine, 1984; c. all rights reserved; Frida and Diego at lunch in Coyoacan (Frida's house), fall 1941.; Rollardcord camera, Panatonic film; This is an unposed photograph. Several times during the long mid-day meal, Frida, because her spine hurt, would get up and walk a little. Often she stopped to embrace Diego's head, which pleased him. I just said (because I had my camera shooting everything that day), "Please just stay exactly like you are for a minute so I can photograph you". They did.; Emmy Lou Packard, 1984
Date based on date of image, not print.

Leon Kroll painting a mural in the Worcester Memorial Auditorium

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 25 x 19 cm. Leon Kroll, standing on a scaffold, working on a mural, which memorializes servicemen, at the Worcester Memorial Auditorium.

Identification on verso (handwritten): Leon Kroll at work on Worcester mural, photographed by Homer St. Gaudens.

Oral history interview with Clay Spohn, 1976 January 9-February 5

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 84 pages.

An interview of Clay E. Spohn conducted 1976 January 9-February 5, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Ruth Gikow, 1964

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound tape reel ; 7 in. Transcript: 29 p. An interview of Ruth Gikow conducted by Harlan Phillips in 1964 for the Archives of American Art.
Gikow speaks of being born in Russia; mural painting at the Bronx Hospital for the Federal Art Project; interest in graphics; the Artists Congress; the Index of American Design; and her thoughts on contemporary painting. She recalls John Stuart Curry and Gene Morey.

"Transportation" painting

National Postal Museum
Mounted between wood and glass, Transportation is a 2 foot by 2.5 foot oil painting on canvas by Vincent Aderente. Similar to much of Aderente's work, the painting depicts a female allegorical figure, most likely representing progress, standing with each hand upon a particular mode of transportation--shipping and the railroad. Her right hand touches a ship with the wide expanse of ocean extending beyond it. Her left hand touches a train that stands adjacent to various smokestacks and factories indicative of industrialization.

The size of this particular painting is very small compared to the rest of Vincent Aderente's portfolio. Consequently, it can be assumed that this painting was a study for a larger mural to be produced at a later date. Markings on the back indicate that Aderente painted this work in 1918, a time when his reputation was growing.

Vincent Aderente was born in 1880 in Naples, Italy, and came to the United States with his parents at the age of six. Much of his early career was as an assistant to the muralist Edwin Blashfield where he worked to build the murals now seen at the Detroit Public Library in 1922. Although most of Aderente's larger work was limited to the New Jersey and Hudson area, Aderente did some small commissions involving printed poems for the American Weekly and the New York Sunday Americans in 1924 which paired his illustrations of allegorical women with poetry. Vincent Aderente is perhaps best known for his work on a series of World War I posters entitled “Columbia Calls,” along with designing eight US Government Bonds in 1935. Aderente died in 1941.

Reference:

Aderente, Vincent Papers, 1906-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. [D32].

Arturo Rodríguez painting his mural, The Great Theater of the World

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : col. ; 13 x 18 cm. Arturo Rodríguez painting his mural, The Great Theater of the World in the courtyard of the Norton Gallery of Art in West Palm Beach, Fla., for the exhibition Walls: Glier, Rodríguez, Wojnarowicz, held Oct. 11- Nov. 30, 1986.
Identification on verso (handwritten): Arturo Rodriguez at work.

Saddle blanket

National Museum of the American Indian

Saddle blanket

National Museum of the American Indian

Oral history interview with David Novros, 2008 Oct. 22-27

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 38 p.

An interview of David Novros conducted 2008 Oct. 22-27, by Michael Brennan, for the Archives of American Art, at Novros' home, in New York, N.Y.

Study for The Rebellion of Man [art work] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Two studies for the right and left panels done for the larger "Rebellion of Man" mural at the auditorium of the University of Guadalajara. The right panel is titled: The Victims or Misery; the left panel is titled: The Leaders or Workers and Soldiers.

Rochfort, Desmond, "Mexican Muralists: Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros," San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1998, fig. 147-149.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

copy 1 negative: 4x5, Safety, BW.

University of Guadalupe, Mexico.

Oral History interview with Nell Sinton, 1974 August 15

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 37 pages An interview with Nell Sinton conducted 1974 August 15, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Sinton discusses the 1960s art world of San Francisco, among other topics.

Arturo Rodríguez, Demi, David Wojnarowicz and Milke Glier

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : col. ; 9 x 13 cm. Artists in front of the mural, The Great Theater of the World in the courtyard of the Norton Gallery of Art in West Palm Beach, Fla., for the exhibition Walls: Glier, Rodríguez, Wojnarowicz, held Oct. 11- Nov. 30, 1986.
Identification on verso (stamped): From left to right: Arturo Rodríguez, Demi (Arturo's wife), David Wojnarowicz, and Mike Glier.

Minerva in a Chariot

Smithsonian American Art Museum

George Biddle

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 24 x 19 cm. Biddle at work on a panel of the U.S. Dept. of the Treasury, Section of Painting and Sculpture - sponsored mural entitled, "Society Freed through Justice", located in the fifth floor lobby of the Attorney-General's office in the Justice Department Building, Washington, D.C.
Identification on accompanying label (typewritten): George Biddle (1885- ). Biddle received his law degree but immediately turned to art. His murals decorate government buildings in the United States, Brazil, and Mexico. He was active in helping to set up the Federal Art Project in the Thirties. Being an artist of great versatility, he has worked in stone, clay, paint, wood, and block printing.

Oral history interview with Manuel J. Tolegian, 1965 February 12

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 58 pages

An interview of Manuel J. Tolegian conducted 1965 February 12, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art.

Doll tableau

National Museum of the American Indian

Painting

National Museum of the American Indian

John Finerty

National Portrait Gallery
The heroic humanism of Mexican muralist Diego Rivera's powerfully drawn figures affected not only the American mural movement but figural art in general. In this portrait of American lawyer John F. Finerty, the bold outline, profile pose, and low vantage point combine to create a mural-like monumentality. Finerty espoused causes congenial to Rivera's social activism. His clients included labor leader Tom Mooney, anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, and convicted spies Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, whose last writ of habeas corpus he prepared and argued the night of their execution. Rivera met Finerty in Mexico in 1937, where the lawyer, as part of a commission investigating trials of political dissidents in the Soviet Union, interviewed the exiled Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky. The drawing was probably made at Rivera's home, where Trotsky was living at the time.

Loom model and unfinished weaving

National Museum of the American Indian

Oral history interview with Anton Refregier, 1964 Nov. 5

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 13 p. An interview of Anton Refregier conducted 1964 Nov. 5, by Joseph Trovato, for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project.
Refregier speaks of his involvement with the Federal Art Project (FAP); government support for the arts; the benefits of the program to the artist and the community; murals he painted for the WPA; and his family background and education.

Oral history interview with Jean Charlot, 1961 August 18

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 21 pages An interview of Jean Charlot conducted by Miriam L. Lesley and Alice Hollis on 1961 August 18 for the Archives of American Art.
Charlot speaks of a fresco painting for Our Lady of Sorrows church in Farmington, Michigan; how he decides upon a fresco design and subject; the technical aspects of the work; his feelings about Asian art; church architecture and its relation to art; teaching art history; the influences in his past which directed him into painting. Also present during the interview are Paul Hendrickson and Brother James Roberts.
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