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Found 5,105 Collections

 

18th Century American Identity and the Common Man

This collection includes resources that help students to draw conclusions about the "common man" and determine how American identity changed during the mid-18th Century United States. The lesson is centered around "Independence" and supporting documents include "Daniel la Motta", "Self Reliance", and Turner's Frontier Thesis. To see full lesson plan, click on "collection info".
#SAAMteach
Julie Thoma
6
 

The Gilded Age/ Transition into Modernism

Lesson Activity/Directions: 

This collection is used, through a See/Think/Wonder format, to launch a discussion about the "Gilded Age" and how the lifestyles, values, belief systems, and socioeconomic circumstances surrounding this era helped prompt the Modernism movement. Discussions revolve around the economic disparities, and some polarizing movements such as Prohibition. Therefore, in a sense, this collection helps launch the Modernism/Great Gatsby Unit.

Students are divided into small groups - usually  no more than 3 per group. Each are provided with one painting. During some lessons, I've printed out the pictures for them, but other times I've also provided them with a link and one student pulls up the painting on their computer - for the group; in this manner, they zoom in and really investigate the details. This works well for a small class. By this point in the school year, we've completed the "See - Think - Wonder" activity enough so that it is familiar. Groups go through this process on their own, and then their art work is on the smart board, and they walk the class through their discoveries, interpretations, and questions. Jointly as a class, we speculate about what this image might reveal to us about the time period, it's people, values, etc. How might we see this play out in literature?  Eventually I weave in a number of the facts provided below in "Notes to other users." 

I conclude with this statement by John D. Rockefeller on the smart board - - it seems to preview some of "The Great Gatsby" themes quite well. 

"I believe it is my duty to make money and still more money and to use the money I make for the good of my fellow man according to the dictates of my conscience." - - John D. Rockefeller, 1905

#SAAMteach

(For background/historical context notes, see below within "Notes to Other Users."


Annette Spahr
12
 

P6 Lyons Webb AP Lit Major Text Review

Our collection of works that reflect on the historical context and themes of The Crucible by Arthur Miller.

Kathryn Webb
10
 

The Seventies: A Crisis of Confidence

This is a teaching collection designed to support an inquiry into why the public lost confidence in the government in the 1970s (70s). Topics covered include the economic recession, the Nixon presidency and Watergate, the Ford presidency, the Carter presidency, the Iran hostage crisis, the oil embargo, the Kent State massacre and the Pentagon Papers.



Guiding questions:

-Why did the U.S. public lose confidence in the presidency in the 1970s?

-What impact did economic crises have on American lives?

Renea Reichenbach
14
 

Mr. Cain

All of these objects came from after Mr.Cain reached adulthood. This was when different life paths came to him. After growing up in the 1950’s where prosperity and innovation was in it was prime he followed his path of leading groups and being involved in his community.

Cain Gary.Personal Interview.26/04/19

Toby Singleton
3
 

A Doll's House Project

Lauren Chelena, Julia Coan

Lauren Chelena
5
 

Oedipus Rex

Andrew and Alex Yes
7
 

Kristen Wardlaw: Final Project

Our final project based on Kristen Wardlaw, the owner and dance coach for Heavenly Rhythm Dance Studio. Kristen is a dance coach who has built her studio from the ground up, using her faith and love for her younger sister as her fuel. She has dedicated her life's work to her younger sister H. Reeb who passed in 2005. This project is dedicated to the hardworking, ambitious, and incredibly loving coach. Thank you. 

Stella Smith
3
 

Major Text Review - Abigail Andrade and Jeffrey Kidwell

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Abigail Andrade
9
 

Behind Design: Exploring American Indian Cultures Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture.

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, See, Think, Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial See, Think, Wonder documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Andrea Croft
30
 

Trials and Tributes of College

This Project is based on ageism and how we as people tend to determine how a person may act depending on their age. For this project, we chose to Interview Christine Wright, a long time Special Educations teacher. Wright has shared with us some objects that define her years in college and how she came to be a teacher in our town. These items help us understand different generations, as well as educating us on not only those in the Madison County area, but also those who grew up and attended college around the same time. This is Wrights unique story about her college experience and how she overcome the trials and tributes to further her education for nearly 10 years. From 2002-2013 Wright attended two colleges in order to receive degrees in different types of special education as well as elementary education. Wright now teaches 4 different special education classes, educating our youth of Madison County.

Hana Harlan
3
 

The Things Josh Gibson Carries

Josh Gibson has a big heart and a love for education. Gibson is a beloved member of our community. He values personal relationships and always is trying to better himself. Family has always been a major aspect in his life. Gibson enjoys the companionship of others, he is very social. Gibson spends the majority of his days with family, friends, and students. He always greets you with a warm smile and is excited  to start any conversation. Josh Gibson's personality lights up any room with his contagious smile and positive attitude. Civic Memorial is blessed to have such a compassionate and intelligent staff member. Gibson's objects—silver medallion, school identification badge, and family photo— illustrate his love for his family, education, and teaching. 



Gibson, Josh. Personal interview. 22 April 2019.


Madelyn Ehlers
3
 

Golden Spike Anniversary Topical Collection

This collection was created by Jared Tupuola, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Jared dove into the histories of Chinese laborers and the Golden Spike Anniversary, the 150th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. 

"On May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific and Union Pacific rail lines were connected in a highly publicized ceremony attended by railroad laborers, major financial supporters and the press. Led by industrial tycoon, Leland Stanford, the event commemorated the birth of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The completion of the railroad made national news and was lauded as a great economic and cultural success for the U.S. 

Despite the attention given to the event, there remained one group of contributors who were almost entirely left out of being recognized for their integral work to the project; Chinese railroad laborers. Although making up the vast majority of the physical work force behind the railroad, Chinese labor contributions were largely disregarded. This instance was not unique to many early Chinese Americans who faced discrimination, animosity, and degradation not only in rail work, but in almost every industry and facet of life. The hardships for early Chinese in America were exacerbated by the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 which not only prevented further immigration from China to the U.S., it also birthed an impetus to drive out Chinese communities already established.

Through this collection, the work, lives, and experiences of Chinese laborers and migrants are presented as an opportunity to learn more about how some of America's earliest Chinese residents navigated America in the late 19th Century. This collection provides art, ceramics and information that expounds upon the realities of Chinese American life and the First Transcontinental Railroad while ensuring that the Chinese contributions are not forgotten.  By no means an exhaustive resource, this collection allows for an introduction into Chinese contributions to the Transcontinental Railroad and encourages further exploration into the topic."

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
77
 

Golden Spike Anniversary

On May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific and Union Pacific rail lines were connected in a highly publicized ceremony attended by railroad laborers, major financial supporters and the press. Led by industrial tycoon, Leland Stanford, the event commemorated the birth of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The completion of the railroad made national news and was lauded as a great economic and cultural success for the U.S. 

Despite the attention given to the event, there remained one group of contributors who were almost entirely left out of being recognized for their integral work to the project; Chinese railroad laborers. Although making up the vast majority of the physical work force behind the railroad, Chinese labor contributions were largely disregarded. This instance was not unique to many early Chinese Americans who faced discrimination, animosity, and degradation not only in rail work, but in almost every industry and facet of life. The hardships for early Chinese in America were exacerbated by the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 which not only prevented further immigration from China to the U.S., it also birthed an impetus to drive out Chinese communities already established.

Through this collection, the work, lives, and experiences of Chinese laborers and migrants are presented as an opportunity to learn more about how some of America's earliest Chinese residents navigated America in the late 19th Century. This collection provides art, ceramics and information that expounds upon the realities of Chinese American life and the First Transcontinental Railroad while ensuring that the Chinese contributions are not forgotten.  By no means an exhaustive resource, this collection allows for an introduction into Chinese contributions to the Transcontinental Railroad and encourages further exploration into the topic.

Jared Tupuola
78
 

Miss Davis CTBF 2.0 Collection

Miss Davis is the band director at a school and is loved by her many students. She has lived in Madison County for her whole life. She attended Triad High School and enjoyed going to school. When asked to participate in Conversations Towards A Brighter Future, she was ecstatic. She decided to pick out six different items: her conducting baton, cat tattoo, clarinet, two rings, and senior necklace. These objects didn't really focus on one specific age, but it revolved around her teens to her early 20's.

Davis was then interviewed over all of the items and had to answer various questions. At the end of her interview, she was asked of how all of the items were connected. She responded that every one of them symbolized all of the steps in her life. Upon further inspection, there seemed to be an underlying theme in the objects about how all of them represent the growth of Davis and her never ending determination to better herself. They also show what she really values in her life.

Davis, Michaela. Personal interview. 18 April 2019.

Sydney Stuart
5
 

The Things Clinton Walters Carries

Clinton Walters was born in Carrolton Illinois in 1978. He is married to Stacy Walters. They have two sons, Hunter and Parker. They attend church every week at First Baptist  in Bethalto. Their family enjoys traveling around the country. These  items portray what is important to Clinton Walters. Walters life revolves around his love for family. His life is full of adventures, you never know what the Walters’ family will do next. Marriage, religion, and traveling is always an exciting experience while being accompanied by family. His wedding band is a constant reminder of his wife. Traveling is a way for Walters to connect with his family. His Bible was given to him by his parents and his faith is very important to him.  


Walters, Clinton. Personal interview. 21 February 2019.


Madelyn Ehlers
3
 

The Things I Carry

A collection of personal objects that characterize Jacob Carlson. This collection contains objects related to his adult years. Each object acts as a window into a different aspect of Jacob's daily adult life, and together allow us to see the larger picture of the teacher and father. Most of the object are utilitarian, their functions giving personal meaning to them over time. Two objects are gifts, and thus have the additional weight of the relationships they hold. Together, the objects demonstrate a value placed on interpersonal relationships and education: intangibles that carry great weight in the life of Jacob Carlson.

Jacob Carlson
3
 

SSYAC 2018/2019 Meeting 6 - "SSYAC in DC" - National Museum of African American History and Culture

The final meeting of the third cohort of the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council takes place on April 24, 2019 in Washington, D.C. SSYAC Affiliate teens will join local teens, along with the Secretary at the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). The group will visit the Supreme Court in the late morning, before heading to NMAAHC to meet with Dr. Skorton, and founding director Dr. Lonnie Bunch, and tour the museum.

This collection displays the history of NMAAHC, and a very important connection to the Supreme Court in American History--Brown vs. Board of Education (1954)--the landmark ruling which overturned a previous decision that education for Blacks in America could be "separate but equal". Thurgood Marshall successfully argued the case before Chief Justice Earl Warren;  Marshall would go on to become the first African American Supreme Court Justice. This collection also highlights Smithsonian resources featuring the female justices of the Supreme Court: Hon. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Hon. Ellen Kagan, Hon. Sonia Sotomayor, and Hon. Sandra Day O'Connor.

Tracie Spinale
60
 

MicroObservatory: A guide to Observing the Universe

MicroObservatory is a network of automated telescopes that can be controlled over the Internet. In this collection, students will learn how they can control these telescopes themselves, using many of the same technologies that NASA uses to capture astronomical images by controlling telescopes in space. After gathering their very own images of space, students will learn the steps professional astronomers take to process the astronomical masterpieces so often seen from NASA, and then have the opportunity to create their very own!

Erika Wright
6
241-264 of 5,105 Collections