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Found 544 Collections

 

Golden Age of Athens

This was a period of Athenian political power, economic growth and cultural flourishing formerly known as the Golden Age of Athens with the later part The Age of Pericles.

THEODORA CHIOTI
12
 

Grade 4 Beliefs Unit - Science, Art, Humanities and Engineering - Museums Go Global

Welcome to the Grade 4 Beliefs Unit Collection. Please enjoy. Below there is information about:

- How the lesson was used specifically at Washington International School (WIS) in Washington DC in 2019 
- The role of STEAM at WIS

Additionally, within the collection, the markers will help guide the teacher through each component. The collection is broken up into: Educating the teacher team (preparing for the unit), STEAM teacher resources, Student activities, and Student learning extensions. 

Enjoy and all feedback is welcomed. 

About: 

Washington International School is an International Baccalaureate (IB), Primary Years Program (PYP). I am the STEAM Specialist who integrates 21st century skill inquiry projects, hands on science and engineering, and digital tools/technology. This collection is to support many teachers who will contribute to content for this unit. The Language specialists, art teacher, design technology, STEAM Specialist and physical education.

STEAM at WIS:

My role will be to host an experience that role-plays early civilizations and their interactions with sun, moon, and stars. Students will interpret their experience and create a piece of art that demonstrates their translation of the experience. The follow up will be to help the students connect their experience with ancient cultures. Then, the conversation will further develop to challenge the students to think how science changes our understanding of our universe. The overall theme is to encourage students and give them confidence to explore various belief systems, challenge their own understanding of the world through their beliefs, experiences, and science. 

These exercises scaffold learning to align student inquiry to the Social Studies standards: 

  • Distinguish between personal beliefs and belief systems (PYP Scope and Sequence Pg. 29)
  • Define the elements of a belief system (creed, codes of behavior, rituals, community.) (AERO CC+ G5 p22 4.5.f)
  • Identify the major religions of the world in terms of their beliefs, rituals and sacred texts. (referenced: AERO CC+ G6 p30 4.8.f)
  • Reflect upon how beliefs affect the individual and society (PYP Scope and Sequence Pg. 29)

Important to know: The teachers at WIS took the students on two days of field trips to visit various areas of "worship" in the DC/MD/VA area: Buddhist Temple, Mosque, Jewish Temple, Catholic Church, and African American Christian Church. Students had worksheets to complete for each location that included observations of icons, the use of shapes in the visual devotional symbols, and to draw the various religious icons. After, they engaged in discussion about their experiences. If your school does not have the ability to do an elaborate field trip like this, we recommend having devotional leaders and/or parents visit as subject matter experts to demonstrate their systems of faith, icons, devotions, and symbols. 


STEAM Project: 

  • I used this collection to train the teachers about the new thinking routines (Beginning slides)
  • There are samples from students learning about Sun, Egyptian use of sun in their beliefs (art and architecture) 
  • Students looked at Egyptian sun use and modern NASA sun data to inspire them for their STEAM Challenge
  • Their STEAM Challenge was to create a pyramid (cardboard) with a devotion (clay), and decorate with sun symbols (crayons/markers). 
  •  Our students just completed a cardboard challenge (Cain's Arcade - check out on Youtube) so they were cardboard construction "experts". Therefore, they only had 40 minutes for their challenge. You will need to either have a lesson on cardboard construction before, or give them more samples and/or time. Hypothetically, this could be a 1/2 day project for students. 
  • The goal is then for students to look at other cultures and other NASA data (Incas (or other Native American tribes)  African Tribes, and/or Australian Aborigines, etc. and have them do the same STEAM challenge (format) by creating a model structure decorated by symbols inspired by both indigenous symbols and modern NASA data (sun, stars, planets, or Earth's Moon). Therefore, they will have a "Maker Collection" that demonstrates various engineering styles as well as belief systems. 


International Baccalaureate Transdisciplinary Unit of Inquiry:  Who we are.  Beliefs - An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships, including families, friends, communities and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human. 

Central Idea: Humans have common beliefs that attempt to answer life’s big questions. 

            - The main line of Inquiry this collection will align with is: Global religious beliefs and practices

The following subject teachers plan to do the following:

           - Art = Beliefs and metaphors with clay

           - Digital Technology = Building sacred structures 

           - STEAM = Engineering and Science of sacred structures globally and historically

Global thinking routines: Step In, Step Out, Step Back; Beauty and Truth; Unveiling Stories

STEAM Challenge:  Students can further their inquiry from ancient beliefs with their experiences with modern organized religion into modern spirituality by analyzing the exhibition for Burning Man Festival. Students will complete a STEAM Challenge to build their own sacred structure that honors their own belief systems. 

#GoGlobal 

Sandra Vilevac
82
 

Green City Remix: Pittsburgh's Smoke Control Campaign

Green City Remix was a collaborative project of the Green Building Alliance and the Senator John Heinz History Center to create exhibits developed and designed by local high school students. In the 1940s efforts were made to combat Pittsburgh’s reputation as the nation’s smoky city, changing both air quality and the city’s image. Using the Allegheny Conference on Community Development collection in the Detre Library and Archives, students researched the Smoke Control campaign, which included legislation passed by city government in 1941 that significantly improved Pittsburgh’s air quality by regulating factors such as fuel sources and the equipment used in industry and in homes.

Through a visit to the Green Building Alliance and conversations with local activists, the students explored ways in which Pittsburgh can continue to improve on its legacy as a smoky city. Students examined art installations at The Mattress Factory and with the help of local artist, Danny Bracken, designed art installations remixing the story of Smoke Control in a way that demonstrates its relevance to today.

This collection includes primary source materials used by the students to explore Pittsburgh's response to air quality challenges. How might these resources inspire your own students to explore the ways changes is made in their city?

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
26
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
 

Harlem Renaissance

This collection helps guide students as they learn about the Harlem Renaissance. There are 3 steps to the lesson:

  1. As a class, students use the "see, think, wonder" visual thinking routine to analyze a painting.
  2. Students watch a video and answer questions about the Harlem Renaissance.
  3. Students individually analyze 6 examples of art from the Harlem Renaissance, including paintings, music, and poetry and connect each piece to the historical context.

Michelle Moses
9
 

Harlem Renaissance: Style and Subject

This collection is meant to be used as an introductory activity to the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. Specifically, it focuses on the different styles employed by artist Aaron Douglas, most notably in his Scottsboro Boys portrait and in his 1925 self-portrait. In doing so, it asks students to consider when and why an artist who is more than capable of creating within the boundaries of classically beautiful art or writing might chose to create in this style at some times and at other times to create in more radical or avante-garde styles. It uses a Compare and Contrast looking technique before revealing to students that all four distinct pieces are created by the same artist. 

Ideally, teachers can end the unit by facilitating discussion of the social change Douglas aims for with his Scottsboro portrait and of the bridge that Hurston creates with her prose narrator before launching into the dialect of her characters that earned her such scorn from the African American community of her era.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Lindsay Van Loon
11
 

Head of State – Power and Authority or Propaganda?

In this collection the theme is "Head of State". Students are to question representation of in terms of power, authority and or propaganda. Included are Houdon's bust of Washington as well as his full length statue; the statue Augustus of Primaporta; and Greenough's statue of George Washington. This collection was created for AP Art History, however it can be used in lower level art history and art appreciation classes as well.

The premise is that students should be able to analyze the differences between two or more styles in terms of composition, choice of subject matter, proportion, color, and so on. Understanding the distinction between styles is especially important in French art (Houdon), where the inheritors of these artistic traditions will become the earliest modernists. Furthermore, artists in the new United States of America tried to capture the spirit of their fledgling republic in their art, but comparing the art of the young nation (Greenough) with that of its European antecedents (Augustus of Primaporta) reveals strong influences as exemplified here.

In addition, students need to be able to answer several key questions when looking and writing about works of art: Why do the historical contexts of the images inform our view of the person depicted? How does the depiction reinforce the image? What message is conveyed in the sculptures? What is the relationship between those portrayed? Finally, how do the works of art relate to specific cultures and the time period in which they were made?

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGTeach #visiblethinking

Jennifer Hendricks
11
 

Henry David Thoreau - Resources and “Walden: A Game"

Can a Video Game Capture the Magic of Walden? 

Henry David Thoreau’s

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com...
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Mary Marotta
11
 

Hispanic Heritage Month: Understanding the American Experience

This Learning Lab collection has been created in conjunction with the Hispanic Heritage Month: Understanding the American Experience professional development workshop, hosted by the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Workshop Description: Whether you are a teacher of social studies, English, Spanish, or visual arts, this program will add nuance and depth to your classroom. Educators will learn how to use art and portraiture by Latino artists or of Latino figures to enhance their students’ understanding of our collective American history.

#NPGteach

Briana White
30
 

History & Hair: Lesson and Collection

What does your hair reveal about your identity? This guided lesson and image gallery invites students to explore their  identity and  to interrogate the role that hair plays in the presentation of self. Using artful looking techniques, students can think critically about the dynamic between the subject and the artist. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGTeach #Hair #History #SocialStudies #Afros #Identity 

DanSymonds
22
 

History and Portraiture: Utilizing Art to Teach American History, Colonial America to the Civil War

This Learning Lab contains a five unit curriculum that puts students in conversation with a diverse group of significant Americans from the colonial era to the present. Lessons on the Elements of Portrayal, Symbols, Labels, Letter Writing, and Portrait Pairing prompt students to analyze the lasting impact of remarkable individuals from the Portrait Gallery’s collection. This collection was originally created in collaboration with Alice Deal Middle School in Washington D.C. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
84
 

History of Mormons in America

This collection of artifacts, photographs, texts, and historical markers is intended to help students explore the history of the Mormon religion in America.

Each of these items is intended to spark inquiry, following the process below:

  1. Students should choose one artifact on which to focus.
  2. Have them use the artifact analysis PDF (last resource) to begin their study of the artifact.
  3. Next, have students generate questions about the artifact? What do they wonder about? What does it tell them about the Mormon religion or its history within the United States?
  4. Have students complete some general research on their artifact that will help their classmates piece together the story of the Mormon experience.

As a collaborative project, students should use the PBS Forced Migrations map/timeline as a model for a class map/timeline of their own.

  1. Project an image of the map on a class whiteboard or create your own basic outline using large paper.
  2. Have each student present their research findings. The main questions they should answer are: What does it represent about the Mormon experience? Where would the artifact they chose be placed (geographically and in terms of chronology)?
  3. Students should then place place their image on the map with significant dates noted.
  4. After all groups have presented, review the narrative of the Mormon experience with the class. What would they identify as critical moments in Mormon history? What questions do they still have?
Tags: religion, Moroni, Joseph Smith, Brigham Young, Mormon, New York, Utah, Illinois, gold plates, inquiry
Kate Harris
18
 

History, Media, and Culture: African American Soldiers in the Civil War

Representation in media is important.

In this Learning Lab, we will explore how the African American soldiers fighting in the Civil War are portrayed in two films: Glory (1989) and Lincoln (2012).

History X Media X Culture (HMC) is a series designed by the National Museum of African American History and Culture to teach students historical thinking skills of analysis and interpretation, and also media literacy by exploring historic and modern films about or created by African Americans.

What can we learn, and what do we learn about history from popular media? How does popular media influence our understanding of history? How does the history portrayed in popular media change from the historical account based on primary sources?

Furthermore, how are historical individuals and groups represented in popular media? How do these representations affect how we understand these historical persons and their modern-day descendants? How people are depicted on the screen influences our modern world. We must question and analyze what is said and shown in the media, and why it shown to us.

Your objectives are as follows:

1. Explore how the soldiers are represented in each film, and then compare the film’s portrayals.

2. Compare these representations to historical accounts and primary evidence.

3. Question why the changes were made in the film, and how do these changes affect our understanding of history and ourselves?

The movies contain images of the violence of war, carnage, and brief offensive languages.

The analysis questions are taken from the National Archives and Records Administration Document Analysis Worksheets, unless stated otherwise.

National Museum of African American History and Culture
34
 

Home

This collection was built as the beginning of a study of im/migration for third grade. The idea came from a teacher developed unit on the Re-imagining Migration site:  https://reimaginingmigration.o...

Since I teach 3rd grade, I needed to change parts of the unit because it was originally developed for high school students. The four main questions remained the same:

  1. How do we define home?
  2. Why do people leave their homes?
  3. What prevents people from feeling welcome in their new home?
  4. What can people do to create a welcoming community?

This collection is to explore the first question - how do we define home? Small groups of students each got a print out of one of the artworks pasted to a larger piece of paper. They then engaged with the See, Think, Wonder routine to examine another's idea of home before creating a picture of their idea of home.

Eveleen Eaton
28
 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
 

How Do Real Historical Resources Help Us Understand Fictional Characters? To Kill a Mockingbird

To explore this "essential question," the resources here offer different contexts for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. They can help visualize and comprehend the setting of the book and the social issues of the Depression era in the South. With that understanding, students may better apprehend the choices and values of the characters in the novel.

Supporting question: "What was it like to live in small-town Alabama during that time?"

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the ficticious Maycomb, Alabama, which author Harper Lee modeled on her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Students may approach the images from the time period and place of the story (1930s) to consider how race and social class make a difference in how one answers that question.

Supporting question: "What important matters were in the news during that time?"

It's not a fact that Harper Lee based the trial in the novel on the Scottsboro boys, but it may have influenced her. Have students look for similarities and differences. What other events were going on? (e.g., Great Depression).

Have students explain how these resources help understand the characters in the novel.

Brenda Sandbulte
14
 

How Do Real Historical Resources Help Us Understand Fictional Characters? To Kill a Mockingbird

To explore this "essential question," the resources here offer different contexts for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. They can help visualize and comprehend the setting of the book and the social issues of the Depression era in the South. With that understanding, students may better apprehend the choices and values of the characters in the novel.

Supporting question: "What was it like to live in small-town Alabama during that time?"

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the ficticious Maycomb, Alabama, which author Harper Lee modeled on her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Students may approach the images from the time period and place of the story (1930s) to consider how race and social class make a difference in how one answers that question.

Supporting question: "What important matters were in the news during that time?"

It's not a fact that Harper Lee based the trial in the novel on the Scottsboro boys, but it may have influenced her. Have students look for similarities and differences. What other events were going on? (e.g., Great Depression).

Have students explain how these resources help understand the characters in the novel.

Michelle Smith
14
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Dave Klippel
3
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Laura Nicosia
3
 

How Planes Fly

This is an introduction to the lesson series to Canvas vs. Aluminum planes. In this collection, students will be looking at different types of planes and how planes fly. The first resource is a video with Peter Jackson and learning how to fly a WWI airplane. The next four slides are different types of planes. The first two are planes from WWI and the second two are planes from WWII. The last resource is an external link to NASA's resource on the importance of the Forces of Flight meaning drag, lift, thrust, and weight. It also talks about the different dynamics of flight.  

Kaitlin Kim
6
 

I've Fallen, and I Can't Get Up

This collection deals with individuals who were ordinary, rose to greatness, and then his/her life was reduced to less than ordinary. This collection will be used with the focus novel, Flowers for Algernon, as well as short stories, poems, and non fiction texts. The initial theme of the unit is FEAR and how we deal with it. These individuals were without fear or possessed the ability to mute that fear even though it cost all of them in the end.  This unit will be used to compare the character arc of Charley from the book to their choice of artwork and the subject's journey. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGteach

Lisa Byrd
27
 

IB Biology Topic 1

Images in this collection represent the Nature of Science (NOS) learning statements found in each of the Topic 1 (cell biology) subtopics of the IB Biology curriculum (2016).   The images and descriptions can be used as an introductory activity to illustrate the depth, variation and cultural relevancy of biological discovery and technological advancement that is part of the IB Biology course.  Or, the images could serve as a revision activity before the end of course exam; students pair the image to the corresponding NOS learning statement. 

Gretel von Bargen
8
 

Iconic Pittsburgh Images, Paired with Project Zero Routines

Includes iconic people, places, and things associated with Pittsburgh. 

Prior to the workshop series, select one resource from this collection and conduct an adapted See-Wonder-Connect routine (What do you see in the resource that's worth noticing? What do you wonder about? What connections do you make to it?). You may consider sharing with a partner, using the Think-Pair-Share routine. Finally, Imagine if... you were using one of these resources in your own practice, what would you have students do with it? 

This collection was created for the Smithsonian Learning Lab workshops in Pittsburgh and the surrounding school districts. Funded by the Grable Foundation and in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, the Quaker Valley School district and the Washington International School. 

#PZPGH

Ashley Naranjo
45
 

Ideas to Solutions with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

How do you help students test their ideas in your classroom? A critical step in the design process, prototyping and testing ideas helps problem-solvers learn from failures, experiment with materials, and visualize their solutions. Educators will dive into a case study from Michael Graves Architecture and Design and explore various techniques to experiment with ideas in the classroom with resources from professional designers and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

#NTOY18 #CHEDUCATION #CHDESIGNTHINKING

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
43
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