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El Coquí

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Puerto Rican culture is a representation of the diverse heritages of three cultural groups: Taíno Indians, Africans, and Spaniards. In this lesson, students will learn about the indigenous people of Puerto Rico, the Taíno Indians, and their influence on Puerto Rican culture.

Bluegrass Music: A Toe-Tapping Exploration of an American Art Form

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Students will be introduced to American Bluegrass music and Appalachian songs through singing, listening and conversation. A number of songs will be compared leading to a conversation on the characteristics of Traditional American music.

"I’ve Got a Friend in Chicago"

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Students will listen to, analyze, and perform music created by children in the United States and for children by American folk artists.In addition, students will record their own games, songs, and chants.

Singing for Justice: Following the Musical Journey of “This Little Light of Mine”

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Students will learn the history behind “This Little Light of Mine”, following the song through slavery, the civil rights movement, and up to its current day applications. Students will also learn to sing the song itself in multiple languages and write their own verses.

Island Soundscape: Musics of Hawai'i, the Solomon Islands, and Papua New Guinea

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Discover the island cultures of the South Pacific and their musical expressions with songs, crafts, and games. Uses recordings of Hawaiian slack key guitar, rhythmic game songs from the Solomon Islands, and Papua New Guinea flute playing.

Trail of Tears: Music of the American Indian Diaspora

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The segments of this unit offer an investigation of the impact of circumstance on the music of a people through examination of several musical selections from the Five Nations heritage (Choctaw and Cherokee in particular) during and following the Trail of Tears of 1831 and 1838 respectively.

Moccasin Madness! Navajo and Apache Moccasin Game Songs

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Moccasin Game songs of the Navajo and Mescalero Apache tribes are little known outside these cultures, but hold intrigue and understanding for those who pursue the experiences noted here. Students will learn the cultural significance, key traits, and pure joys of playing Moccasin Game songs through an exciting process of listening, singing, and playing.

The Power of Pete Seeger’s Songs and Stories

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Open the eyes of your students to the beauty and power of American and world folk songs and stories through the iconic figure of Pete Seeger. Explore his important work in promoting peace, understanding, community, and wonder through song.

Get Moving With Ella Jenkins

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
In these two lessons, accompanied by music from Get Moving with Ella Jenkins, young students can develop comfort singing, clapping, and moving along with musical tracks, while also developing an understanding of basic musical concepts (beat, volume, notes, and rests).

"Love Is the Thing to Make it Fall": African-American Music in Alabama before and during the Civil Rights Movement

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This set of lessons is an introduction to African-American music in Alabama through children’s songs of the 1950s as well as freedom songs of the 1960s. In addition to attentive listening, students will sing, play instruments, improvise, move, and play games.

Unveiling Stories: Project Zero Global Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero “Global Thinking” routine for revealing multiple layers of meaning. This routine invites students to investigate the world and develop powerful habits of global journalism consumption. The framework asks students to consider five questions: “What is the story?,” “What is the human story?,” “What is the world story?,” “What is the new story?,” and “What is the untold story?”

UNVEILING STORIES

A routine for revealing multiple layers of meaning

1. What is the story?

2. What is the human story?

3. What is the world story?

4. What is the new story?

5. What is the untold story?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine invites students to reveal multiple layers of meaning in an image, text, or journalistic report. Each layer addresses a key dimension of quality global journalism: the central, most visible story; the way the story helps us understand the lives of fellow humans; the ways in which the story speaks to systemic global issues; what is new and instructive about the story and issues explored; and the important absences or unreported aspects of the story. This routine also invites students to investigate the world and develop powerful habits of global journalism consumption – habits that are transferable to information consumption more broadly.

Application: When and where can it be used?

This routine can be used in global competence development in the arts, geography, literature, and history.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

You may consider selecting some – not all – of the routine’s questions depending on your goals. You may also consider modifying the order in which the questions are introduced. In using this routine with your students, you may see “the story” interpreted in one of the following ways: 1) “the story” told by the article, image, or material that they read, or 2) “the story” proposed to explain or contextualize the event depicted, i.e. “the human story that led to the contamination of the Mexican gulf begins with our dependence on fossil fuels.”

Beauty and Truth: Project Zero Global Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero “Global Thinking” routine for exploring the complex interaction between beauty and truth. This routine invites students to consider how journalists and artists communicate ideas about the world. After picking an image or story to examine, the framework asks students to consider: “Can you find beauty in this [image, story]?,” “Can you find truth in this [image, story]?,” “How might beauty reveal truth?,” “How might beauty conceal truth?”

BEAUTY AND TRUTH

A routine for exploring the complex interaction between beauty and truth

1. Can you find beauty in this [image, story]?

2. Can you find truth in this [image, story]?

3. How might beauty reveal truth?

4. How might beauty conceal truth?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine invites students to explore the complex interaction between beauty and truth and consider how journalists and artists comment on and communicate ideas about the world. This routine also helps students navigate the overwhelming quantities of information accessible in an increasingly visually-informed world.

Application: When and where can it be used?

In art and journalism, the routine aims to slow students’ thinking down and invite them to reflect about how quality work uses beauty to engage us to learn more about an issue and seek truth. The routine also invites a critical analysis of the ways in which beauty can mislead.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

Think of this routine as one that invites you and your students to a broad and deep conversation about a photograph or work of art. Allow time for individual students to share ideas of beauty and truth – constructs unlikely to have been explored explicitly in the past. In their discussion, students may reveal the misconception that photographs by their very nature reveal truth. In questions three and four, the terms “beauty” and “truth” can be inverted.
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