Skip to Content

Found 2,386 Resources

"Love Is the Thing to Make it Fall": African-American Music in Alabama before and during the Civil Rights Movement

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This set of lessons is an introduction to African-American music in Alabama through children’s songs of the 1950s as well as freedom songs of the 1960s. In addition to attentive listening, students will sing, play instruments, improvise, move, and play games.

Making it Fair: Now, Then, Later: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero "Visible Thinking" routine for finding actions. This routine helps students identify and evaluate specific actions to make a situation fair. After framing the task by discussing an issue of fairness, the framework asks students to: “Brainstorm actions that might ‘make it fair’,” “Sort the list into actions that make the situation more fair in the past, now, or for the future,” and “Pick one idea from the list that has the most merit and expand on it” in order to evaluate the issue.

MAKING IT FAIR: NOW, THEN, LATER

A routine for finding actions

1. Frame the task. Discuss an issue of fairness.

2. Brainstorm actions that might “make it fair.”

3. Sort the list into actions that make the situation more fair in the past, now, or for the future.

4. Evaluate. Pick one idea from the list that has the most merit and expand on it.

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine asks students to identify and evaluate specific actions to make a situation fair. It also helps students see that fairness and unfairness are not merely judgements one makes and that issues of fairness invite direct action.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Use this routine with issues of fairness that naturally arise in the classroom or issues of fairness that have been studied.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

Present and clarify the issue/dilemma to the class. Everyone should agree that the situation was not fair to all parties involved. During the brainstorming portion, record students’ ideas on the board or with chart paper. The focus should be on an open generation of ideas without evaluation. To facilitate openness during this portion, you might want to have students think in terms of “I wonder what might happen if…” You may also want to label the list “I wonder what might happen if…” to further encourage students to think about possibilities. When you begin to sort students’ ideas, if there is a category where there are not many ideas, have students generate additional ideas for that category. During evaluation, you may want to have students expand and justify their choices either verbally or in writing.

Reporter’s Notebook: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero "Visible Thinking" routine for separating fact and feeling. This routine helps students organize ideas and feelings in order to consider a situation where fairness may be at stake. Asks students: “Identify a situation, story, or dilemma for discussion,” “Identify the facts and events of the situation,” “Identify the thoughts and feelings of the characters/participants involved in the situation,” and “Make your best judgement of the situation based on the information at hand.”

REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK

A routine for separating fact and feeling

1. Identify a situation, story, or dilemma for discussion.

2. Identify the facts and events of the situation. Are these clear facts and events, or do you need more information about them?

3. Identify the thoughts and feelings of the characters/participants involved in the situation. Are these clear facts, or do you need more information about them?

4. Make your best judgement of the situation based on the information at hand.

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine helps students distinguish facts from thoughts and judgements. By organizing ideas and feelings, students may better consider a situation where fairness may be at stake. It also promotes the fine discernment of information and perspective-taking in order to clarify and make a tentative judgment.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Use this routine in a number of situations, including discussing imagined or real moral dilemmas; topics from history, literature, or science; after reading a chapter or watching a video; or when thinking about actual events from students’ own lives. This routine is most useful “mid-investigation” after some information about a given situation is already on the table – maybe the discussion is becoming convoluted, there are disagreements, opinions are taken as facts, or things are generally getting “messy.” Use this routine to go deeper into an issue to clarify thoughts or to clarify what the issue actually is.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

Ask students to imagine they are a newspaper reporter tasked with differentiating the facts of a given event or topic from involved characters’ thoughts and feelings. The stance of a reporter helps students clarify issues and points of agreement and disagreement by creating distance from their own perspective or initial understanding of a situation. Draw a 4x4 grid. Along the top, write “Clear” and “Need to Check.” Down the side, write “Facts and Events” and “Thoughts and Feelings.” List responses in the appropriate portion of the grid. Make sure students talk about the characters involved and not their own thoughts or feelings. Once the grid is completed, ask students to make their best judgment of the situation based on the information at hand.

Picture Writing

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
An activity to observe, describe, and write a story about an artwork. Emphasizing the process of writing rather than simply the end product, this activity invites students to look, explore, and think.

PICTURE WRITING

An activity to observe, describe, and write a story about an artwork.

1. List every detail you see (or do not see) in the work.

Do not include emotions that the work evokes or reactions to the content of the work.

Suggestions: List countable things, such as all the red, blue, or black items in the work. In writing things that are not in the picture, do you see all the fingers on the subjects’ right hand? Did the painter portray both the left and right side of the subject’s face?

2. Write a short description of the work so that another person could instantly recognize it.

Provide information but withhold all judgements.

3. Share descriptions with peers. What details do you remember from their descriptions?

Did the writer include any comments that were not just descriptions? If so, what were they?

4. Write a story about the work. Think of the work as a frame of a movie. “Unfreeze” the frame and set the painting into motion.

Write the story of what has just happened or what is about to happen. Mentally push the painting’s frame back and tell the enlarged story.

LAUNCH: Ideas for use

This activity can be used with any kind of visual art. Have students pick an artwork that most interests them. This may be from a Learning Lab collection of artwork you have pre-prepared for the students to explore or it may be an artwork that the student found by searching the Learning Lab database.

As students list details they see in the artwork and write their short descriptions, encourage them to describe details such as "orange flowers in background by stone fence" or "silver earring shaped like a teardrop." Encourage them to avoid listing any emotions that the painting evokes or any judgments or assumptions they might have about the work. For example, they could write something like "hands folded, eyes closed" but should avoid such language as "lost in prayer" or "sad and downhearted." Making judgments about the relationships between people in the pictures, e.g., "mother and son," should also be avoided.

When it is time for students to write their stories, tell the students that, unlike their descriptions, the stories need not be limited to physical facts. Any emotions or judgments the students wish to incorporate into their stories, as well as any way they wish to interpret what's happening in the paintings, is fine.

One way students might want to approach their stories is to concentrate on what's currently happening in the painting. Explain that if they take this approach, it might be helpful to treat the painting as if it were a frozen frame in a movie. To set the painting into motion, they can mentally "unfreeze" the frame. Other approaches to telling the painting's story include writing about what has just happened or about what is going to happen. Explain to the students that whatever they write, they must not contradict any factual information about the painting.

Have students share their stories with the group. If possible, have students read their stories to the group in front of the artwork they chose as their subject.

Conversing with an Object

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
An activity to create written conversations using objects. Emphasizing the process of writing rather than simply the end product, this activity invites students to look, explore, and think.

CONVERSING WITH AN OBJECT

An activity to create written conversations using objects

Choose two objects that would have an interesting conversation if they could speak to each other. Then, write a dialogue between the objects. Consider:

1. What are the objects?

2. How were they used?

3. How old are the objects?

4. Who made the objects?

5. Where was the object made?

6. What features do the objects have?

7. How do the objects feel about living in a museum and living in the public eye (or out of the public eye) day after day?

8. Who are some of the people or things in the objects’ existence (e.g. previous owners, other objects that the object spent time with, other objects nearby)?

9. What personalities might the objects have (e.g., a cactus would have a “prickly” personality)?

10. What might a typical day in their lives be like?

11. Do the objects have a secret existence that people don’t know about? For example, do they carry on conversations when one another when all the people lock up the museum and go home?

LAUNCH: Ideas for use

This activity can be used with any kind of object. Have students pick two or more objects that interest them, either from a Learning Lab collection of objects you have pre-prepared for the students to explore or from searching the Learning Lab database.

In writing their dialogues, encourages students to use their imaginations in creating their conversations but require them to also include some factual information about the objects themselves. Once complete, have students read or perform several dialogues for the group. If possible, select pieces that offer clues to the objects’ identities without giving them away. (If you can’t find any, select some that the writers could modify slightly to achieve “anonymity.”) Have the writer of each piece, along with one other student, read or perform the dialogue. Ask the group if they can guess which objects are having the discussion and why.

Pensar, Sentir, Preocuparse: Project Zero Agency by Design Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Un Project Zero “Agency by Design” rutina de pensamiento para explorar complejidad.

PENSAR, SENTIR, PREOCUPARSE

Explorar complejidad

Asumir una posición dentro de un sistema: (Escoja una variedad de personas dentro de un sistema y luego asuma el punto de vista de cada una de ellas. A medida que piensa en lo que sabe acerca del sistema, tenga en cuenta lo que cada persona puede pensar, sentir y qué la preocupa.)

1. Pensar: ¿Cómo la persona entiende este sistema y su papel dentro de él?

2. Sentir: ¿Cuál es la respuesta emocional de la persona hacia el sistema y hacia su posición en él?

3. Preocuparse: ¿Cuáles son los valores, prioridades o motivaciones de esta persona con respecto al sistema? ¿Qué es importante para esta persona?

Propósito: ¿Qué tipo de pensamiento promueve esta rutina?

Esta rutina anima a los estudiantes a considerar las diferentes perspectivas de diversas personas que interactúan dentro de un sistema en particular. La meta de esta rutina es ayudar a los estudiantes a entender que la variedad de personas que participan en un sistema piensan, sienten y se preocupan de manera diferente sobre las cosas en función de sus posiciones en el sistema. Esta rutina fomenta la toma de perspectiva, plantea preguntas y hace evidente otras áreas para continuar la investigación.

Aplicación: ¿Cuándo y cómo se puede utilizar esta rutina?

Esta rutina de pensamiento se puede utilizar para explorar la perspectiva de cualquier persona dentro de un sistema en particular. Esta rutina se puede utilizar por sí sola o en combinación con otra rutina.

Comenzar: ¿Cuáles son algunas ideas y consideraciones para poner en práctica esta rutina de pensamiento?

Al trabajar como individuos o en grupos pequeños, puede ser útil pedir que los estudiantes esbocen un monólogo corto o una pequeña escena que contenga algunas de las diferentes personas que participan en un sistema en particular. Ellos pueden entonces asumir el papel de varias personas en su sistema, y representar una pequeña escena, en donde cada estudiante representa la perspectiva de una persona diferente.

Una vez que los estudiantes representan a una persona en su sistema de una manera particular, pídales que representen a la misma persona pero de una manera diferente. Esto llevará a sus estudiantes a comprender que incluso dentro de grupos particulares de personas, no hay una sola perspectiva, sino más bien una serie de perspectivas que cada persona puede tener.

Se debe animar a los estudiantes a tener en cuente cómo lo que la gente piensa, siente y se preocupa puede estar alineado o no dentro de un sistema en particular. Cuando no estén alineados, pregúntele a sus estudiantes cómo manejan o negocian estas tensiones dentro del sistema. Pueden surgir discusiones sobre estructuras de poder desiguales dentro de un sistema.

Al tiempo que la rutina le pide a los estudiantes que asuman la posición de un personaje y se imaginen cómo pueden pensar, sentir y de lo que se preocuparían desde este punto de vista, es importante recordar que los estudiantes no pueden realmente conocer y comprender la perspectiva de otra persona. Al participar en esta rutina de pensamiento, es importante para los estudiantes ir más allá de los estereotipos e intentar imaginar las experiencias vividas por ciertas personas. Anime a sus estudiantes a asumir la posición de personas específicas (por ejemplo: Julia, una trabajadora migrante; John, un vendedor de autos usados; y Martin, un senador republicano) en oposición a tipos de personas (por ejemplo, un trabajador migrante, un vendedor de autos usados, y un senador republicano).

En la toman de perspectiva, los estudiantes probablemente se basarán en sus suposiciones sobre los diversos tipos de personas representadas en su sistema. A medida que lo hagan, pueden llevar a los estudiantes para que en la discusión tengan en cuenta de dónde provienen estas suposiciones. Usted puede animar a los estudiantes a desafiar sus suposiciones preguntándoles lo que realmente saben sobre la perspectiva de otra persona y lo que pueden hacer (por ejemplo, realizar entrevistas, hablar con un abuelo, etc.) para averiguar más acerca de la perspectiva otra persona.

Imagínese Si…: Project Zero Agency by Design Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Un Project Zero “Agency by Design” rutina de pensamiento para encontrar oportunidad.

IMAGÍNESE SI…

Encontrar oportunidad

Escoja un objeto o sistema: (Tenga en cuenta las partes, los propósitos y las personas que interactúan con el objeto o sistema y luego pregunte:)

1. ¿De qué manera podría hacerse más eficaz?

2. ¿De qué manera podría hacerse más eficiente?

3. ¿De qué manera podría hacerse más ético?

4. ¿De qué manera podría hacerse más bello?

Propósito: ¿Qué tipo de pensamiento promueve esta rutina?

Esta rutina primero apoya el pensamiento divergente, a medida que los estudiantes piensan en nuevas posibilidades para un objeto o sistema; luego apoya el pensamiento convergente, a medida que los estudiantes deciden la manera más efectiva para construir, manipular, re/diseñar o alterar un objeto o un sistema. Finalmente, esta rutina de pensamiento busca encontrar oportunidades y nuevas ideas.

Aplicación: ¿Cuándo y cómo se puede utilizar esta rutina?

Esta rutina de pensamiento se puede utilizar para explorar las posibilidades de mejorar, retocar o ajustar cualquier objeto o sistema. Aunque esta rutina se puede utilizar por sí sola, sugerimos que se use en combinación con otras rutinas de pensamiento de Agency by Design (AbD) para mostrar a los estudiantes las maneras en que pueden mejorar un objeto o sistema en particular.

Comenzar: ¿Cuáles son algunas ideas y consideraciones para poner en práctica esta rutina de pensamiento?

Esta rutina de pensamiento pide a los estudiantes que imaginen nuevas maneras de mejorar un objeto o sistema, observando las posibilidades de dicho objeto o sistema a través de cuatro lentes diferentes. Específicamente, esta rutina pregunta ¿de qué manera se puede hacer este objeto o sistema para que sea más eficaz, eficiente, ético o bello? Creemos que estos cuatro lentes pueden ser de ayuda y los animamos a que con sus estudiantes consideren otros.

Al involucrarse con esta rutina de pensamiento, puede estar inclinado a decirle a los estudiantes que "el cielo es el límite". Si bien es importante que los estudiantes generen ideas dentro de un espacio amplio de posibilidades, también hemos encontrado útil poner algunos limites creativos al pensamiento de las personas. Puede hacerlo limitando la variedad de herramientas y materiales a los que tienen acceso los estudiantes, presentando ciertos criterios de funcionalidad o identificando una población o grupo de usuarios en particular. Por ejemplo, en una actividad de re/diseño de una silla, se puede decir a los estudiantes que solo deben usar cartón y sujeta papel, que sus nuevos modelos de silla deben ser capaces de sostener el peso del instructor, y que las sillas deben ser diseñadas para personas que van al trabajo todos los día en el metro.

Al considerar cómo rediseñar o alterar un objeto o sistema, es emocionante ver que los estudiantes generan una lista de ideas amplías y excepcionales, pero también es importante que sean sensibles al diseño de sus objetos o sistemas. Para logarlo, recomendamos que los maestros le pidan a sus estudiantes usar otras rutinas de pensamiento de AbD a medida que buscan nuevas oportunidades y hacen una lluvia de ideas sobre otras posibilidades. Del mismo modo, si los estudiantes se estancan y se les dificulta generar nuevas ideas, usar otras rutinas de pensamiento de AbD puede ayudarles a encontrar oportunidades y ver nuevas posibilidades para sus objetos o sistemas.

Partes, Personas, Interacciones: Project Zero Agency by Design Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Un Project Zero “Agency by Design” rutina de pensamiento para explorar complejidad.

PARTES, PERSONAS, INTERACCIONES

Explorar complejidad

Identifique un sistema y pregunte:

1. ¿Cuáles son las partes del sistema?

2. ¿Quiénes son las personas que están conectadas con el sistema?

3. ¿Cómo las personas en el sistema interactúan entre sí y con las partes del sistema?

4. ¿Cómo el cambio en un elemento del sistema afecta diferentes partes y personas conectadas con el sistema?

Propósito: ¿Qué tipo de pensamiento promueve esta rutina?

Esta rutina de pensamiento ayuda a los estudiantes a ir lentamente y observar de cerca un sistema. Al hacerlo, los jóvenes son capaces de ubicar objetos dentro de los sistemas y reconocer las diversas personas que participan dentro de ellos, ya sea directa o indirectamente. Los estudiantes también se dan cuenta de que un cambio en un aspect del sistema puede tener efectos en otro, tanto intencionales como no intencionales. Al considerar las partes, las personas y las interacciones dentro de un sistema, los jóvenes comienzan a notar la multitud de subsistemas dentro de los sistemas. Esta rutina de pensamiento ayuda a estimular la curiosidad, plantea preguntas, pone en evidencia áreas para seguir investigando e introduce el pensamiento sistémico.

Aplicación: ¿Cuándo y cómo se puede utilizar esta rutina?

Esta rutina de pensamiento se puede utilizar para explorar cualquier sistema. Esta rutina puede utilizarse por sí sola o en combinación con otra rutina.

Comenzar: ¿Cuáles son algunas ideas y consideraciones para poner en práctica esta rutina de pensamiento?

Antes de comenzar esta rutina, puede ser útil ayudar a los estudiantes a comprender qué es un sistema. Las definiciones son útiles, pero hemos descubierto que los ejemplos concretos funcionan mejor (por ejemplo, el sistema de trenes, los sistemas de reciclaje de la ciudad, el sistema de distribución del almuerzo en la escuela, etc.).

Para participar en esta rutina de pensamiento, sus estudiantes tendrán que identificar un sistema para explorar. Una manera de hacerlo es pedir que sus estudiantes ubiquen un objeto dentro de un sistema más amplio. Por ejemplo, una estampilla puede ubicarse dentro del sistema postal y el casco para montar en bicicleta puede ubicarse dentro de un sistema de transporte más amplio.

Anime a sus estudiantes a nombrar los sistemas que les gustaría explorar. Esto puede ser complicado para algunos estudiantes y puede ser útil reorientarlos hacia la definición de un sistema o un ejemplo concreto que haya compartido anteriormente. A continuación, puede preguntar a sus estudiantes si su sistema cumple los criterios que se habían discutido anteriormente.

Los sistemas están conformados por subsistemas, que a su vez, son partes de sistemas más amplios. Con el fin de evitar la confusión de que todo está conectado con todo, invite a los estudiantes a definir los límites de su sistema.

Al trabajar en grupos, es útil que los jóvenes primero hagan una lista de todas las partes y personas involucradas en un sistema, y luego tracen su sistema en un papel para hacer visibles las interacciones entre todas las partes y personas en el sistema.

Partes, Propósitos, Complejidades: Project Zero Agency by Design Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Un Project Zero “Agency by Design” rutina de pensamiento para observar de cerca.

PARTES, PROPÓSITOS, COMPLEJIDADES

Observar de cerca

Escoja un objeto o un sistema y pregunte:

1. ¿Cuáles son sus partes? [¿Cuáles son sus diferentes piezas o componentes?]

2. ¿Cuáles son sus propósitos? (¿Cuáles son los propósitos de cada una de sus partes?]

3. ¿Cuáles son sus complejidades? [¿Cómo se ve la complejidad en sus partes y sus propósitos, en la relación entre estos dos o de otras maneras?]

Propósito: ¿Qué tipo de pensamiento promueve esta rutina?

Esta rutina de pensamiento ayuda a los estudiantes a ir lentamente y observar detallada y cuidadosamente, al animarlos a mirar más allá de las características obvias de un objeto o sistema. Esta rutina de pensamiento estimula la curiosidad, plantea preguntas y hace evidente otras áreas para continuar la investigación.

Aplicación: ¿Cuándo y cómo se puede utilizar esta rutina?

Esta rutina de pensamiento se puede utilizar para explorar cualquier objeto o sistema. Esta rutina puede utilizarse por sí sola o en combinación con otra rutina.

Comenzar: ¿Cuáles son algunas ideas y consideraciones para poner en práctica esta rutina de pensamiento?

La rutina brinda una oportunidad para hacer visible el pensamiento de los estudiantes a través de la creación de listas, mapas y dibujos de las partes, propósitos, complejidades de varios objetos y sistemas. Usted puede presentar los tres elementos de esta rutina al mismo tiempo o hacerlo de uno en uno.

Si el objeto con el que los estudiantes están trabajando está presente y/o físicamente visible, los estudiantes no necesitan tener más antecedentes. Sin embargo, si los estudiantes están trabajando con un sistema, por ejemplo, la democracia, puede ser útil para los estudiantes tener conocimientos previos o darles la oportunidad de reflexionar sobre sus experiencias, al interactuar con ese sistema en particular.

Para llevar esta rutina al siguiente nivel, después de que los estudiantes hayan considerado las partes, propósitos y complejidades de un objeto tal como es, puede pedirles desbaratar los objetos con los que están trabajando y luego continuar identificando las partes, propósitos y complejidades que observan y usar diferentes marcadores de colores.

Usted puede cambiar la palabra "complejidades" por términos más accesibles, tales como inquietudes o preguntas.

Circles of Action: Project Zero Global Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A Project Zero “Global Thinking” routine for fostering a disposition to participate and take responsible action. This routine invites students to distinguish between personal, local, and global spheres and deliberate about potential courses of action and their consequences. The framework asks students to consider what they can do to contribute to an issue within three circles of action: “In my inner circle (of friends, family, the people I know),” “In my community (my school, my neighborhood),” and “In the world (beyond my immediate environment).”

CIRCLES OF ACTION

A routine for fostering a disposition to participate

What can I do to contribute…

1. In my inner circle (of friends, family, the people I know)?

2. In my community (my school, my neighborhood)?

3. In the world (beyond my immediate environment)?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine is designed to foster students’ dispositions to participate and take responsible action. It invites them to distinguish personal, local, and global spheres and make local-global connections. It also prepares them for an intentional deliberation about potential courses of action and their consequences.

Application: When and where can it be used?

This routine can be used across disciplines (e.g., geography, science, literature, economics) and with a broad range of resources (e.g., films, narratives, photographs) typically addressing a conflict, problem, system, or design that can be improved through participation and engagement. This routine can also be used informally in daily school contexts and interactions where individual students can exhibit agency (e.g., a conflict among friends, consumption patterns, the integration of immigrant students).

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

This routine invites students to map possibilities for action, and the order of questions can be inverted if necessary. Call students’ attention to an issue that they can perceive as requiring solutions. Students are best prepared to use this routine when they have a moderate understanding of the issue, are primed to care about it, and have a sense of urgency or need for a response. This routine is particularly effective when students sense the need but have difficulty considering viable paths for action. The routine can be followed by discussing: What are the barriers to students’ capacity to take action at various levels? Drawing on a rich initial actions map, students may be invited to consider factors such as ethics, viability, personal interest, and potential impact as they decide what to do next.
2377-2386 of 2,386 Resources