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Found 5,584 Collections

 

Classroom Activity Using Images of Immigration and Identity from the National Portrait Gallery, the New York Times, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Students can use the "What makes you say that?" and the "3 Ys" thinking routines to explore two modern portraits about identity and immigration from the National Portrait Gallery. The first thinking strategy asks students to look at a work of art for several minutes before answering two questions: "What's going on?" and "What do you see that makes you say that?" (See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

To further and deepen the discussion, I've included a link to a September 2016 New York Times Op-Doc entitled "4.1 Miles," about a coast guard captain on a small Greek island who is suddenly charged with saving thousands of refugees from drowning at sea. (If it doesn't show up easily, you can view the original video on Times Video at https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004674545/41-miles.html.) I've also included two sculptures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an interview with Lisa Sasaki, head of the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Center, and resources from the University of Minnesota  Libraries Publishing's Immigration Syllabus - Americans / Immigrants, Weeks 1-4.

You may wish to use the "3 Y's" thinking routine here as well, which asks students to consider the following questions:

1. Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?

2. Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?

3. Why might it matter to the world?

(See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

#APA2018, #LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 1: Precious Knowledge - Exploring notions of identity and community, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
14
 

"Becoming Dolores": A School/Museum Program to Engage Families through Art and Technology

This collection details a photography and community engagement project that the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access did with educators from the National Portrait Gallery and the Fairfax County Family Literacy Program. It includes assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate the program as is, or design their own, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

For our project, pairs of native Spanish speaking immigrant moms and their middle school children did a five-day (15 hours total) training session at their school and at the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery. They learned about Dolores Huerta, portraiture, and photojournalism through the exhibition, "One Life: Dolores Huerta." Participants took portraits of themselves, critiqued each other's work, and created photo exhibitions about their communities and important issues, that were displayed at the Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day at the National Portrait Gallery.

Dolores Huerta, the "co-architect" of the American Farm Workers Movement and mother to eleven children, proved to be a huge inspiration to the participants. Before the workshop, 33 percent of the parents and none of the children saw themselves as able to make change in their community; after the workshop, 100 percent of parents and children reported seeing themselves as able to make change in their community. In addition, 100 percent of the mothers and 80 percent of the children reported that they believed they had increased their artistic skills.

#LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Units 2 (What is the History - Civil Rights Movements) and 3 (Critical Geography and Current Issues) of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course, and Unit 3 (Local History and Current Issues) of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. "What would you advocate for to beneficially change your community? How can you advocate to create change within your community?" "How do you understand the concept of community advocacy? What is needed for an individual to cultivate personal change?"

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 

Philippa Rappoport
15
 

Nicholasa Mohr and New York's Puerto Rican Migration

This topical collection explores Antonio Martorell's portrait of prolific Latina author Nicholasa Mohr, and is displayed with a range of resources that offer a view, through art, portraiture, and literature, into the lives of Puerto Rican migrants to the continental United States in the early to mid-twentieth century. The images and resources can be used as discussion or writing prompts in a variety of courses, including history, culture, literature, and language.

The portrait itself,  one of a series of 45-minute portraits that Martorell made of his artist friends, captures Mohr's spirit, much in the way that Mohr's writing brings to life the people, sounds, and activities of New York's Puerto Rican migrants in the twentieth century. The collection also includes a bilingual video with National Portrait Gallery curator Taína Caragol, as well as the first page and a review of "Nilda," one of Mohr's most well-known novels, about a Puerto Rican girl coming of age in New York during World War II. This book was selected as an "Outstanding Book of the Year" by the New York Times, and a "Best Book of 1973" by the American Library Association.

The collection includes images and a bilingual podcast by Martorell speaking about a different work in the Smithsonian American Art Museum collection, "La Playa Negra" ("Tar Beach"), which is the term used by Puerto Rican migrants for the rooftops of tenement buildings. As the label describes, in this painting, "a fashionable woman wears a fur-collared coat and sits in front of a New York City skyline. Her hardworking double on the left sits behind a sewing machine. In his "Playa Negra" ("Tar Beach") series, Martorell juxtaposed migrants' prosperous self-image with a glimpse of their tiring labor."

The collection also includes a series of photographs from the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, by Hiram Maristany, a resident and photographer of the El Barrio neighborhood. Maristany grew up with eight siblings on East 111th Street. In addition, the collection includes links from PBS Learning Media on Puerto Rican history and migration.

#LatinoHAC #BecauseOfHerStory #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 2: Culture and Resistance, Expressions of culture and values, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. "How do expressions of culture reflect assimilation and resistance to assimilation? How do distinct expressions of culture reflect specific values for various ethnic groups?" 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
24
 

Puerto Rico’s Fragile Modernity: An Exploration of Francisco Rodón's Portrait of Luis Muñoz Marín, using Global Thinking Routines

This teaching collections aims to help students to think critically about Puerto Rico's past and present, as portrayed in the media and through close looking at a portrait. The collection explores Francisco Rodón's monumental portrait of Luis Muñoz Marín, the first democratically elected governor of Puerto Rico, known as “the Father of Modern Puerto Rico.” Although the portrait and supporting video with National Portrait Gallery curator Taína Caragol were created before Hurricane Maria devastated the island in September 2017, a close examination of the portrait itself lends a deeper understanding not only of Francisco Rodón, but of the history of Puerto Rico itself, both pre- and post-Hurricane Maria.

Included here are the portrait from the National Portrait Gallery, a video with the curator, two suggested Global Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero materials, a lesson plan from PBS Media on Puerto Rican Perspectives, and three news articles (from Vox and the New York Times) about Hurricane Maria, at the time in 2017 and almost one year later.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

#LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 3: Critical Geography and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course ("In this unit, students will identify historical patterns to understand how past events influence current policies, ideas and practices.") and Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course ("How do government policies and the judicial system in a democratic society impact diverse groups and communities?").

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 

Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Zozobra in Santa Fe: A Contemporary Reckoning of a Local Tradition

This teaching collection encourages students to think about all sides of an issue - in this case a cultural event - and then make connections to related issues of identity and nationalism locally, nationally, and internationally. The collection uses an article by Eduardo Díaz, director of the Smithsonian Latino Center, and Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, as a jumping off point to explore changes to Santa Fe's annual Fiesta de Santa Fe, described by organizers as “the oldest, most colorful community celebration in the nation,” as part of an ongoing conversation across the country about how we choose to honor our "history, multicultural legacies and unique blend of traditions."

The exercise is scaffolded with global competence strategies to help students explore the Fiesta in successive detail, consider the various perspectives of the communities involved, and make connections to similar conversations happening across the US today. Students can share ideas in groups or through writing assignments, adding in outside research  if desired. 

Keywords: American Indian, Native American, Pueblo Indians, Hispanic, Latino, Entrada

#LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 3: Critical Geography and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course. "How do diverse groups of people become interconnected and aligned with different places and communities? What is the relationship between geographic space and different communities, and how does this interaction shape our society How does regional politics, economics, culture, and geography influence issues and events?"

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Investigating the Life of Enslaved People Through Artifacts

In this collection, you will examine artifacts, paintings and text that gives you a window into the life of enslaved people of the US during 1700s and 1800s. I created this content as a way for my 4th grade students to dig deeper in their understanding of enslaved people beyond what our textbook provides. The students are asked to take meaningful analysis of the artifacts and to consider what further inquiries they have. 

#goglobal

While you navigate through this collection, consider:

See Think Wonder Thinking Routine

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think?
  • What do you wonder?

Main, Side, Hidden

  • What is the main story?
  • What is the side story?
  • What is the hidden story?

Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine

  • What is the main story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world (issues) story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?
Ellen Rogers
27
 

Unveiling Stories: Children at Work

I created this collection to have my students understand better the role children played in the past. Considering how quickly I have to teach history to my 4th graders I wanted to rely on photographs to help orient the students into time and place. I focused on the late 1800s into the mid-1900s. The students in my class wanted to know more about children's lives during the time period we were learning about. The purpose of the collection is to push the students to think beyond what they immediately see and consider the bigger ideas captured in these photographs.

#goglobal

Students engaged in thinking routines during this activity:

See, Think, Wonder

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think?
  • What do you wonder?

Unveiling Stories

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the hidden story?

Ellen Rogers
15
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
16
 

Eone was founded with an innovative spirit and an unwavering mission: to create fashionable products that are accessible for everyone.

Eone was founded to solve a problem: to tell time, people who are blind have had to choose between intrusive talking watches, or fragile tactile watches. There were hardly elegant, quality alternatives.

Eone founder Hyungsoo Kim was a graduate student at MIT when he learned of this problem through a friend who is blind. Guided by the conviction that everyone has a right to time, he collaborated with designers and persons with vision impairments to create a watch that everyone—sighted or blind—can use and enjoy. Learn more here

Mary Marotta
1
 

Henry David Thoreau - Resources and “Walden: A Game"

Can a Video Game Capture the Magic of Walden? 

Henry David Thoreau’s

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com...
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Mary Marotta
11
 

Designers are Problem Solvers-Teacher Resource Collection

Designers are inspired by problems! With a defined problem as a starting point, designers find solutions through a design process that includes empathizing with the user, brainstorming ideas and prototyping solutions. At Cooper Hewitt, your class will see the design process in action during a deep exploration of various objects featured in our permanent and temporary exhibitions. Students will also experience the design process in a hands-on, interactive workshop where they will work collaboratively to solve problems through design thinking.

Program objectives:

  • Students will be able to define key design process terminology including define, empathize, brainstorm, prototype, test, and launch.
  • Students will understand the user’s role in the designer’s process
  • Students will understand that a designer’s choice of materials inform the form and function of a design.

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
21
 

Frank Sinatra's Musical Genius, Part I, the Skinny Years

This collection provides a chronology of Frank Sinatra's musical life and influences that shaped his career. There are three stages: Skinny Years, Hat Years and Tux Years, all based on Will Friedwald's book entitled "Sinatra! The Song is You" and other references, which have been cited.

Quizzes, video and audio files are included to provide a greater understanding the of man and his talents. #SmithsonianMusic

Friedwald, W. (1995). Sinatra! the song is you: a singer's art. New York: Scriber.

To see PART II “The Hat Years” please click on the here.

To see PART III "The Tux Years” please click on the here.

Rhonda Davila
16
 

Louise Nevelson

Did you know that Louise's dad owned a lumber yard? No wonder she enjoyed creating wood assemblages.

Look at a selected sculpture with a partner and discuss:

  • What do you see?
  • How is it arranged?
  • What does it make you think of?
  • What kind of meaning or story can you find in the sculpture?
  • How did Louise unify her sculptures? (UNITY is when all the parts work together to create a cohesive artwork.)

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Abraham Lincoln Primary Sources

Here are some primary sources near ford's theatre and lincoln's deathbed.

Daniel Mian
2
 

Test run artifact

Mabi Aleman
2
 

"An Unnoticed Struggle: A Concise History of Asian American Civil Rights Issues" | Complementary Resources

This topical collection can be used as a complement to the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) Resource, "An Unnoticed Struggle: A Concise History of Asian American Civil Rights Issues" (https://jacl.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Unnoticed-Struggle.pdf). Each section of this collection aligns with the historical events, impactful legislation and profiles of individuals outlined within the JACL's resource. 

This collection can be used to support a deep dive into the featured topics and provides sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple perspectives represented in the sources. 

#EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 1: Precious Knowledge--Exploring notions of identity and community, Historical Foundations and Civil Rights of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
47
 

Egyptian Ancient Art + Culture

The purpose of creating this collection is because when we talk about Egypt, it certainly has the best history of ancient art, since it was the first culture to adopt and recognize what we called today, “art”. Some of the ancient Egyptian arts include painting of figures with arms and legs on the wood, stones, and ceramics. In this collection, I will be showing multiple ancient arts that were created by the Egyptians long time ago.

 #AHMCFall2019

Jenny Chou
6
 

Voices and Votes - Faces of Change in American Democracy

Description: 

This learning lab introduces students to individuals who have shaped and participated in American democracy over time. Using a variety of resources, take in the stories and impact of Thomas Jefferson, Molly Pitcher, Thomas Paine, Richard Allen, William Apess, Wong Chin Foo, Alice Paul, Ella Baker, and Dolores Huerta.

Voices and Votes: Democracy in America is an exhibition from Museum on Main Street traveling to rural American from 2020-2025. Voices and Votes is based on the exhibition American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith at the National Museum of American History. This learning lab can be used in conjunction with the exhibition or as a stand alone resource on the history of democracy.

Visit Smithsonian History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

Guiding Questions:

Who has influenced American democracy? Why did they participate in American democracy and what did they achieve? Have these people changed over time?

How have social movements changed American democracy throughout history?

How can individuals or groups take action to participate in American democracy?

What issues at a local, state, or national level affect your life? Can your participation in American democracy resolve those issues?

Who is participating in and influencing national, state, or local conversations about  American democracy today? Who would you add to this list?

SITES Museum on Main Street
49
 

Voices and Votes - Power of the Press

The press and media have influenced America even before it was a country. The goal of this learning lab is to show the effect media has played on our democracy. It is also important to understand the bias that media and press can have on us everyday. Realizing this influence can make all of us better citizens.

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

A Classroom or Family Project: "Today I Am Here," with examples of student work

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, ESOL, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate their own "Today I Am Here" project, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

The "Today I Am Here" book is a wonderful classroom activity, made from one sheet of paper, in which students can share their family stories. The design of the book works well for a K-5 classroom displays, and helps to show the breadth and diversity of the class and to encourage cross-cultural understanding. The project also works extremely well with ESOL students of any age, although the teacher will need to be prepared for possible difficult issues to surface. 

Included here are instructions to make the book, examples of student work (images and video of students reading), as well as images from classroom displays.

The book design is one of many available in another collection: Fun for the Whole Family: Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/1tozk88HXhnFBU6d.


Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Bracero Program: Unveiling Stories

In this activity, students will examine photographs documenting the Bracero Program, the largest guest-worker program in US history. Started in 1942 as a temporary war measure to address labor demands in agriculture and railroads, the program allowed Mexican nationals to take temporary agricultural work in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, and 24 other states. By the time the program ended in 1964, over 4.6 million contracts were awarded.

Using two Project Zero Global Thinking Routines - "Unveiling Stories" and "The 3 Ys" - students will analyze the stories these photographs tell about the experiences of braceros in this program, and the impact of these stories in multiple contexts. Additional resources (primary sources, a digital exhibition, and an article) and information on how to use these routines in the classroom can by found by clicking Read More ».

Keywords: mexican, immigration, work, migration, migrant workers, agriculture, reform, politics, government, leonard nadel, photojournalism, activity, inquiry strategy, global competency, global competence, latino, chicano, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, 1940s, 40s, 1950s, 50s, 1960s, 60s


molly page
37
 

Family Fun

Images of families enjoying activities together.

Jean-Marie Galing
13
 

Practicing Transcendentalism by Drawing with Words

This activity will be completed at the end of a transcendentalism unit in American literature.  Students will be tasked with studying a landscape, drawing the landscape, and filling it in with words.  After the initial activity students will be given a template where they can choose how to show their transcendentalist pastiche through words, colors, quotations, etc.

#NPGteach

Leslie Reinhart
9
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