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Found 6,091 Collections

 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Where Do You Stand? Voting

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Where Do You Stand? VOTING, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Where Do You Stand? VOTING invites students to critically think about the nuances and complexities of issues and learn from the experiences and reasoning of their peers as they form their own opinions and responses to a range of prompts. The learning begins with the guiding question: What does voting mean to you?

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

National Museum of American History
29
 

AMERICAN EXPERIMENTS Where Do You Stand? Protest

This collection contains supplemental artifacts and resources for Where Do You Stand? PROTEST, part of the American Experiments suite of educational resources from the National Museum of American History.  

These interactive resources and games challenge students to think about their roles and responsibilities within their democracy. Where Do You Stand? PROTEST invites students to critically think about the nuances and complexities of issues and learn from the experiences and reasoning of their peers as they form their own opinions and responses to a range of prompts. The learning begins with the guiding question: What would you do to support what you believe in? 

Visit Smithsonian's History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

National Museum of American History
14
 

Triumph and Tragedy: Westward Expansion (NHD @ the National Museum of American History)

This collection includes objects and resources related to Westward Expansion in the 19th century. During this time the nation expanded its borders into territory held by American Indians, France, and Mexico, claiming millions of acres and thousands of people as part of the United States. Additional resources on this topic can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

Each National History Day collection from the National Museum of American History includes selected resources to support NHD projects under the 2019 theme - Triumph and Tragedy. This collection is by no means comprehensive, but should be used as a place of inspiration for new projects or source of additional information for ones already in the works.

#NHD2019 #NHD

National Museum of American History
50
 

Triumph and Tragedy: Voting Rights (NHD @ the National Museum of American History)

This collection includes objects and resources related to founding of the American system of democracy and those who have and have not been eligible to  vote. When it was established, the United States of America boasted more eligible voters than ever before. But it was still just a fraction of the new country’s population. The nation’s founders never envisioned the numbers, classes, sexes, and races of Americans that cast ballots each Election Day. Throughout American history, voting rights have expanded, contracted, and expanded again as Americans dealt with shifting issues of politics, race, class, and wealth. 

Additional resources on this topic can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

Each National History Day collection from the National Museum of American History includes selected resources to support NHD projects under the 2019 theme - Triumph and Tragedy. This collection is by no means comprehensive, but should be used as a place of inspiration for new projects or source of additional information for ones already in the works.

#NHD2019 #NHD

National Museum of American History
61
 

LDH Election Posters

National Museum of American History
12
 

What Will You Stand For? Video Resources

Throughout American History, young people have led, influenced, and defined the outcomes of our elections and politics. By organizing, lobbying, advocating, protesting, and voting, young voices supply our democracy with a never-ending source of fresh ideas, concerns, and hopes. This tradition continues today, as voters ages 18 to 24 make up the biggest potential voting bloc in modern elections.

This Learning Lab collection can be used in conjunction with a short video that challenges young people to reflect on and discuss “What will you stand for?” Find the video and additional resources here: https://historyexplorer.si.edu...

This video is part of a series of short films from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History that looks at how young people have historically shaped public opinion and outcomes. These brief videos help young people learn from the civic actions of youth in the past to become thoughtful, informed, and active participants in their democracy today. Through historical stories of youth engaged in our elections and politics, these videos show how youth have made history through civic action and challenge today’s young people to continue shaping their democracy. 

National Museum of American History
33
 

Women in the Great War

This collection brings together objects and resources from the National Museum of American History that consider some of the critical ways that women supported and participated in World War I. Using these artifacts and resources, engage students in a thoughtful discussion to analyze the guiding question: How did women shape the outcomes of World War I?

Additional information and resources can be found in the museum's online exhibitions The Price of Freedom: Americans at War, Advertising War: Women and the War, Modern Medicine: Women in the War, and Uniformed Women in the Great War.

#BecauseOfHerStory

National Museum of American History
20
 

National Youth Summit 2019 | Woman Suffrage: The Ballot and Beyond

Suffrage marked an important moment in the progression of women's participation in American democracy and civic life. Yet it was an imperfect victory, and one that stands neither as a beginning nor an end, but as an important milestone in the fight for equality, justice and representation. The 2019 National Youth Summit will look at woman suffrage as an example of how groups with limited political power have shaped and continue to shape our democracy using tactics and tools, like public protest and the vote, to give voice to issues and galvanize fellow Americans into communal movements for change. Use this collection to examine the legacy of the woman suffrage movement and explore the guiding question: What can we learn from the tactics of the suffragists?

Download the conversation kit and learn about the 2019 National Youth Summit webcast here.

National Museum of American History
24
 

Breaking Barriers: A Microscopic World

This collection includes objects and resources related to medicine in the 19th century. During this time, an incredibly huge scientific barrier was broken when scientists discovered bacteria and viruses, which could not be seen with the naked eye, could cause disease. This board will examine the scientific barrier that was broken into the microscopic world and how medicine and modern science changed due to such discoveries.  Additional resources on this topic can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

Each National History Day collection from the National Museum of American History includes selected resources to support NHD projects under the 2020 theme - Breaking Barriers. This collection is by no means comprehensive, but should be used as a place of inspiration for new projects or source of additional information for ones already in the works. For grades 6-8.

#NHD2020 #NHD


National Museum of American History
18
 

Breaking Barriers: Navajo Code Talkers (NHD @ National Museum of American History)

This collection includes objects and resources related to the Navajo Code Talkers who served in World War Two. Navajo Code Talkers challenged racist stereotypes and used their unique cultural heritage to fortify the American war effort. Additional resources can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

Each National History Day collection from the National Museum of American History includes selected resources to support NHD projects under the 2020 theme - Breaking Barriers. #NHD2020. This collection is by no means comprehensive, but should be used as a place of inspiration for new projects or source of additional information for ones already in the works. 

#NHD2020

National Museum of American History
18
 

Breaking Barriers: The Locomotive

This collection includes objects and resources related to transportation in the 19th century. The locomotive train broke barriers on transportation in the early 1800s. Travel was suddenly much faster than it used to be - the trip from New York to Boston, which by carriage would have been a day and a half, with the train was now less than a day. This allowed for easier travel not only of people, but of supplies such as food and raw goods, which helped in turn spur industry in the 19th century. Additional resources on this topic can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

Each National History Day collection from the National Museum of American History includes selected resources to support NHD projects under the 2020 theme - Breaking Barriers. This collection is by no means comprehensive, but should be used as a place of inspiration for new projects or source of additional information for ones already in the works. For grades 9-12.

#NHD2020 #NHD


National Museum of American History
26
 

Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans in World War II

This collection includes objects and resources related to Japanese incarceration during World War II. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 through which tens of thousands of Americans of Japanese ancestry were moved into relocation centers. Additional resources can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

National Museum of American History
41
 

Cindy Whitehead’s GN4LW Skateboard - Conversation Kit Resources

A skateboarding pioneer, Cindy Whitehead turned pro at seventeen, skating both pool and half-pipe and becoming one of the top-ranked vert skaters while competing against the boys—something girls were not doing in the mid-1970s. But Whitehead had no choice but to wear boys’ shorts when competing; there were no skate products for girls in the 1970s.

She changed that in 2013 with her girl-empowered brand Girl is NOT a 4 Letter Word (GN4LW). Whitehead is especially supportive of young female skaters through the GN4LW skate team and products which are geared towards women and girls.  

Whitehead’s signature phrase printed in gold on many of the GN4LW products personifies her independent spirit, "Live life balls to the wall. Do epic sh*t. Take every dare that comes your way. You can sleep when you’re dead." 


This Learning Lab collection contains artifacts and resources that support the Conversation Kit on Cindy Whitehead's GN4LW Skateboard as part of the Smithsonian's American Women's History Initiative. #BecauseOfHerStory

National Museum of American History
32
 

Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans in World War II

This collection includes objects and resources related to Japanese incarceration during World War II. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 through which tens of thousands of Americans of Japanese ancestry were moved into relocation centers. Additional resources can be found by visiting the National Museum of American History's online exhibitions at AmericanHistory.si.edu and History Explorer at HistoryExplorer.si.edu

National Museum of American History
47
 

Living Systems

Diverse living organisms fill our planet with beauty and wonder.  Plants, animals and many other creatures may seem to exist on their own, when in reality they are interdependent with the world that surrounds them, living and non-living.  Co-existing with other plants, animals, and man, each living organism is part of a grand, intricately woven web and system that allows for the flow of energy, food and life. Producers, consumers, predators and prey play vital roles in sustaining life on Earth.  This collection provides the opportunity to consider how each organism affects others. A Harvard University Project Zero routine has been included.

Nancy Butler
27
 

Talent, Tenacity and Contributions to Arts & Sports

Explore a few famous Americans in the fields of art and sports whose exceptional talents and tenacity raised the bar for everyone in their fields.

Nancy Butler
24
 

Cosmic Survey

Discover some of the features of the Universe: 

Cosmic Glossary

Activities: How Big? How Far? How Old?


Chris Hunt
15
 

China's Terracotta Army: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will analyze figures from the Terracotta Army, made for China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE), in order to explore the artistic practices of a newly unified China during the Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE). Students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in the terracotta warrior figures before designing their own papercraft terracotta warrior.

The Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta warriors and horses, was created for Emperor Qin Shihuang to form a small part of his elaborate tomb complex. These figures are significant not only because of their artistic realism, detail, and diversity, but also because of their rarity – the majority of surviving objects from this time period have been found in Emperor Qin Shihuang's tomb complex.

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; see wonder connect; project zero; visible thinking routine; strategy; maker; art making; papercraft; terra cotta; shihuangdi; shi huangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

#visiblethinking

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
20
 

China’s Terracotta Army: The Terracotta Warriors

In this activity, students explore the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 terracotta figures of warriors and horses made for China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). After learning about Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) afterlife beliefs analyzing the types of figures, layout of pits, and other object included, students will create their own arguments about what the Terracotta Army reveals about Emperor Qin Shihuang. This collection is Part 2 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; cross-cultural comparison; think puzzle explore; strategy; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
18
 

China's Terracotta Army: Information and Teaching Resources

This collection contains information and teaching resources on the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta figures created for the tomb complex of China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). Resources in this collection cover a wide range of topics, including: the discovery of the Terracotta Army, Emperor Qin Shihuang, the unification of China, Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) spiritual beliefs, how the terracotta warriors were made, the different types of terracotta warriors, and the types of bronze weaponry found in the Terracotta Army pits. This collection also contains three interactives: a timeline of ancient Chinese history, a map of the tomb complex, and maps of battle formations in the Terracotta Army pits.

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history.They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; religion; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world history; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
33
 

Bessie Smith: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Bessie Smith, the "Empress of the Blues" and one of the most influential blues singers in history. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes a video clip of Bessie Smith performing "St. Louis Blues" in 1929 and a post from the National Museum of African American History and Culture discussing her and other LGBTQ African Americans of the Harlem Renaissance.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened her music, does the portrait capture your image of Bessie Smith? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Bessie Smith, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, 20s, 30s, American, Tennessee, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
11
 

Sculpting Walrus Ivory videos

Walrus ivory is a precious sculptural material that for millennia has been carved into a nearly endless variety of forms essential to Arctic life, from harpoon heads to needle cases, handles, ornaments, buckles and many more. Naturalistic and stylized figures of animals and humans were made as charms, amulets and ancestral representations. Carvers today bring this conceptual heritage to new types of work.

During a week-long residency organized by the Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in 2015, Alaska Native carvers Jerome Saclamana (Iñupiaq), Clifford Apatiki (St. Lawrence Island Yupik) and Levi Tetpon (Iñupiaq) studied historic walrus ivory pieces from the Smithsonian’s Living Our Cultures exhibition and Anchorage Museum collection, and demonstrated how to process, design and shape walrus ivory into artwork. Art students, museum conservators, school groups, local artists and museum visitors participated throughout the week. Also, a two-day community workshop in Nome was taught by Jerome Saclamana and hosted by the Nome-Beltz High School. The video set presented here introduces the artists and document the materials, tools and techniques they use to make walrus-ivory artwork. An educational guide with six lessons is included below pair with the videos, along with links to a selection of Iñupiaq and St. Lawrence Island Yupik objects from the Smithsonian collections that were carved from walrus ivory.

 Tags: Iñupiaq, Inupiaq, Eskimo, ivory, walrus, carving, carver, carve, Native art, museum, education, St. Lawrence Island Yupik, Yupik, Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
28
 

Christopher Dartey 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of the project is to see what we believe is the most important part of the 1920's and 1930's.

Christopher Dartey
0
 

The Hexagon and Honey Bee in Design and Engineering

Exploring the hexagon in design and engineering, using the honey bee as a model.

Pamela Schembri
39
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