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Found 414 Collections

 

John F. Kennedy Portrait

This activity explores Elaine de Kooning's John F. Kennedy portrait and the process of its creation from sketches to the final piece. The collection includes a video about John F. Kennedy's assassination and prompts learners to better understand how to read this portrait by thinking critically while answering questions.

Christina Shepard
8
 

Journey of the Vin Fiz

The Vin Fiz was the first aeroplane to cross the United States from coast to coast. At a maximum speed of 51 mph and many in flight set backs, the Vin Fiz made the crossing in over 84 days.

Arthur Glaser
26
 

Korean+Art+Culture+Language

This Learning Lab Collection is designed for students who are studying Korean. Students will explore Korean art from the Freer collection, and learn more about Korean culture, history, and tradition by using artworks. Through the exploring art and learning Korean process, student will develop a greater understanding of the unique aspects of Korean culture and the structure of Korean language. 

Keywords: Korean, Language, Art, Culture, Tradition

#AsiaTeachers

This Learning Lab Collection is following Virginia Department of Education Standards of Learning for World Language: Non-Roman Alphabet Language for character-based language. Click here to find more information (p. 29-46) 

Level 1: Students begin to develop communicative competence in the target language and expand their understanding of the culture(s) of the people who speak the language.

Level 2: Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

Level 3: Students communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using structures that are more complex in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

Level 4: Students continue to develop their communicative and culture competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication.

Level 5: Students are able to exchange and support opinions on a variety of topics related to historical and contemporary events and issues at a proficiency level commensurate with their study. 


SSCCKoreanSchool
25
 

Labor History: The Great Strike of 1877

This curriculum pack was produced by the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania and includes everything you need to teach about the Great Strike of 1877 in Pittsburgh.  The five lessons can be used as a group or individually, and guide students towards creating their own documentary about the subject--click on the paperclip to find the activities that make up each lesson. Primary sources  are also included (be sure to click on the paper clip and/or info icon on each item to find out more about it). 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
21
 

Lactase Persistence and Human Migration

How can genetics help us to understand human migration? In this collection, students will use maps, articles, and videos to analyze genetics research about lactase persistence before building their own maps to understand the co-evolution of genes and culture. 

This collection can be used in a Biology classroom with units on enzymes, genetics and/or human evolution, in an interdisciplinary unit to link Math with Biology (students to use ratios, statistics, and data to build a map) or in a Geography course.

Students should be either given a color copy of the lactase persistence map or it could be projected. Once students have been given the time and opportunity to look at the map, the following questions should be asked.

  1. What do you notice about this map?
  2. What questions do you have about this map?
  3. What can this map show us about human migration?

Next, ask students to work in groups, each choose one of the following three articles to read, then share a brief summary of their article with those in their group. These articles are excellent resources that provide different perspectives on lactase persistence and evolution. The first article (the source of the lactase persistence map) provides a clear explanation of what we can learn from milk fats found on ancient pottery shards and the link between lactase persistence and migration. The second article focuses on animal domestication and the third on the nutritional benefits of being able to digest lactase as a selective advantage.

The third article also connects lactase persistence, the shift to agricultural communities, and human migration with the genetics of human skin color. This could provide an opportunity for students to discuss the inheritance of skin color and perhaps skin color and race. A separate collection has been made to help discuss this and can be found here.

In the activity section, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute BioInteractive (HHMI) video summarizes some key aspects about the genetics of lactase persistence as well as some of the history. If students have already read and shared out to show understanding, the video could be used to meet the needs of students who tend to be more auditory learners. The activity “Patterns in the Distribution of Lactase Persistence,” also from HHMI, guides students though an understanding of the co-evolution of genes and culture. “Students analyze data obtained from published lactase-persistence studies involving many populations sampled around the world. The activity involves calculating percentages, drawing pie charts, plotting the pie charts on a world map, and analyzing the data. This lesson provides an interdisciplinary approach to studying lactase persistence, connecting biological concepts and data analysis to world geography and culture”. (https://www.biointeractive.org/sites/default/files/Patterns-in-the-Distribution-of-Lactase-Persistence-Educator.pdf)

The map the students create can be compared to the initial image provided (a map of lactase persistence) as well as the information provided by the Smithsonian Magazine articles to predict the path of human migration. Based on the initial map, reading and activity, students can show their understanding of the connection between genetics and human migration by using the Project Zero thinking routine ‘Claim, Support, Question’. Claims can be made based on their new knowledge and then supported with evidence from the map, reading or activity. Then, students can pose questions for further research or discussion.

In the additional resource section, a YouTube clip has been provided to further extend the conversation. Sarah Tishkoff, from the earlier HHMI video, does an excellent job explaining the co-evolution of culture and the gene for lactase persistence.

Emily Veres
10
 

Langston Hughes: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Langston Hughes, an American poet, novelist, playwright, and activist. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  Also includes "The Music in Poetry" lesson plan and website, which connect the rhythm of blues stanzas to Langson Hughes' poetry and may be used as a lesson extension.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how they wanted to be seen, or how others wanted them to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having read one of his poems, does the portrait capture your image of Langston Hughes? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Langston Hughes, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: missouri, mo, poetry, jazz, blues

Tess Porter
10
 

Language, Gender, and Culture: What is the author’s or artist’s role in society?

Introduction. In this unit, students investigate literature and art by individuals who, through their work, reflect on the U.S.-American experience. Is it the role of the artist and the writer to make us more reflective? If so, to what end? If we look at a startling image or read an inspiring story, is it a momentary thing? Do we go on unaffected or are we somehow changed? Are we supposed to do more than reflect? Are we supposed to rethink the ways we interact with others? Revise the way we live? Are we meant to take action? Our answers to these questions help us to understand the role of the author and the artist in a society that is fraught with conflict and, in a sense, put on edge by questions of identity.

David Booth
11
 

Larry Itliong: Breaking Barriers in the Labor Movement

Larry Itliong (October 25, 1913- February 8, 1977) was a Filipino American labor organizer. Itliong immigrated to the United States in 1929 at the age of fifteen. Itliong worked throughout the country as a farm laborer and in the salmon canneries of Alaska. In response to oppressive treatment of Filipino farmworkers, Itliong organized labor strikes. Itliong contacted Cesar Chavez and asked Mexican farmworkers to join the strike with the Filipinos. He believed that all workers had to stand together in their fight for justice. The National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) voted unanimously and the Mexicans joined the Filipinos in the Great Delano Grape Strike. A year later, AWOC and NFWA merged to become the United Farm Workers (UFW). The Delano Grape Strike lasted for five years. As director of the UFW, Chavez took the limelight, but co-founder and former assistant director Larry Itliong has been cast in the historical shadows. 

The media and sources in this collection can be used alongside the National History Day SEARCH Historical Context Graphic Organizer and the Ethnic Studies Praxis Story Plot from the Journey for Justice Teachers' Guide. Both resources help students think critically about Larry Itliong's life, accomplishments and activism and help provide context for the labor movement more broadly.

#NHD #NHD2020 #EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 2: What is the history?, Civil Rights Movements of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Latino Art Now! Chicago Virtual Gallery

This survey virtual exhibition, featuring 40 artworks and 35 artists, examines the artistic production of artists of Latin American and Caribbean descent and US-born Latinos in Chicago, IL. The site of confluence of various migratory waves from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Central and South America throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, at this moment Chicago boasts the fifth largest Hispanic and Latino Community in the United States.


The Latino Art Now! Chicago Virtual Gallery is an innovative 3D immersive space that supports the current broad definition of American art prompted by changing demographics. It explores artistic issues, contexts, meanings, visual cultures and historical grounding sin addition to artists' own engagements with identity, community, public art and the urban space.


The Latino Art Now! Chicago Virtual Gallery and the Educator Transmedia Training Toolkit Vol. 2 are a collaboration between the Inter-University Program fro Latino Research (IUPLR) headquartered at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Smithsonian Latino Center (SLC). This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support for the Educator Transmedia Training Toolkit Vol. 2 is made possible by the generous support of Comcast NBC Universal, and the Chicago Community Trust.

Smithsonian Latino Center (SLC)
1
 

Learning about the Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s through an Individual's Experience: Emilia Castañeda

This collection includes a video interview and testimonial with Emilia Castañeda (April 10, 1926). Castañeda was a young Mexican American girl when she and her family were forced to leave their home and deported to Mexico from the United States in the 1930s. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the federal government's forced removal of Mexican Americans.

Complementary resources to the short film include: Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting an oral history, and additional articles, videos and podcast files highlighting this history.

Use this collection as an extension to the LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes' collection, Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens in the 1930s. *This collection was created to support Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economic, Politics and Policy, Judicial Issues of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

#EthnicStudies #BecauseOfHerStory

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: unconstitutional deportation, Mexican Americans, repatriation, Great Depression, close listening


Ashley Naranjo
20
 

Learning Lab Teaching Collection for Frost Art Museum Workshop using Luis Cruz Azaceta's

This teaching collection is designed to be used in the Frost Art Museum's "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" workshop on November 6, 2018, to guide participants in a looking activity and to demonstrate the range of tools available in the Learning Lab. 

It is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...) , which aims to help students think critically and globally using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.

Included here are an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, a contextual video featuring the artist himself, three suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines," "The 3 Y's," and "Headlines" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections, and an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.


#LatinoHAC

Renee Mills
20
 

Learning Lab Teaching Collection for Frost Art Museum Workshop using Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq"

This teaching collection is designed to be used in the Frost Art Museum's "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" workshop on November 6, 2018, to guide participants in a looking activity and to demonstrate the range of tools available in the Learning Lab. 

It is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...) , which aims to help students think critically and globally using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.

Included here are an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, a contextual video featuring the artist himself, three suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines," "The 3 Y's," and "Headlines" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections, and an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.


#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
15
 

Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme "The Search for an American Identity"

This collection is designed to help educators bridge the classroom experience to a museum visit. It is intended to demonstrate various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools, while offering specific, replicable, pre-engagement activities that can simply be copied to a new collection and used to help students engage with museum resources. 

Included here: 

  • Section 1: a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. 
  • Section 2: a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  
  • Section 3: a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.
  • Section 4: spacer tile template to serve as chapter headings in longer collections.

This collection is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," - the subject of the Montgomery College - Smithsonian 2019 Fellowship program. 


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
29
 

Liberty Bonds of World War I (WW1)

This collection presents three different liberty bonds primary sources dating from 1918: a postcard, sheet music/song, and a celebrity aviator's brochure. With these resources students will explore Liberty Bonds, also called war bonds or liberty loans, which were essentially loans from the American people to the U.S. government to fund the Allies' involvement in World War I. Many public campaigns presented purchasing bonds as the patriotic way to support the war from the home front. Carefully chosen words and imagery conveyed this message and persuaded Americans to act quickly, through both subtle and direct messaging. 

Essential questions: What role did Liberty Bonds play in financing the U.S. WWI effort? How did persuasive language techniques and visuals lead many Americans to see Liberty Bonds as part of their patriotic duty on the home front? 

Keywords: primary source, secondary source, soldiers, World War I, Great War, Ruth Law, "What are you going to do to help the boys?", army, military, Uncle Sam, WWI, persuasion, advertising

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Postal Museum's "My Fellow Soldiers: Letters from World War I" teacher workshop (July 19, 2017). It focuses on one of the many postcards from this topical collection to demonstrate its use in the secondary classroom. #NPMTeacherPrograms

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
6
 

Lions and Tigers Oh My

This Collection Introduces The Children to Lions and Tigers and how they are in the wild to children and encourages them to start collections of their own based on the Book "Have You Seen My Cat" by Eric Carle

Mary Alexander
18
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Look for the Helpers: Analyzing Social Movements

Mr. Rogers is quoted as saying, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping." This collection will give students a framework to "look for the helpers"--the people who are trying to change society for the better during difficult times. Students will be introduced to a variety of strategies and tactics used in social movements, and consider how these might apply to an area of their own interest.

Included is a chart listing possible strategies for social movements that encourages students to find examples of tactics/strategies from the collection and determine the goals of each.

Opportunities for extension include:

Identify a social movement that relies on more than one strategy (most do). Can you create a "recipe" listing the various tactics used to create a successful movement?

Who is involved? Choose one of the examples from above to study further. Who was involved in that particular tactic or strategy? Consider different occupations (teacher, writer, church leader, student, mother) and also different demographics (gender, race, age, ethnicity, etc.)

What's missing? Are there strategies that you have encountered in your research that don't fit into this chart?

Kate Harris
31
 

Looking Closely at Portraits by Amy Sherald, Kehinde Wiley, and Titus Kaphar

Three contemporary artists - Amy Sherald, Kehinde Wiley, and Titus Kaphar - grapple with the underrepresentation of African Americans in portraiture and American history. 

Growing up in Columbus, Georgia, Amy Sherald looked for images of African Americans in advertising, art books, and in local museums and galleries. It was disappointing to her as a young adult not to find dignified portrayals of people who looked like her. In 2016, when she won the National Portrait Gallery’s Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition for her painting Miss Everything: Unsuppressed Deliverance, she told a group of young African American girls visiting the museum that she painted the portrait for them so that “when you go to a museum you will see someone who looks like you on the walls.”

Kehinde Wiley is known for his vibrant, large-scale paintings of African Americans posing as famous figures from the history of Western art. Kehinde Wiley’s portraits collate modern culture with the influence of Old Masters. Incorporating a range of vernaculars culled from art historical references, Wiley’s work melds a fluid concept of modern culture, ranging from French Rococo to today’s urban landscape. By collapsing history and style into a unique contemporary vision, Wiley interrogates the notion of master painter, “making it at once critical and complicit.” 

Titus Kaphar illuminates the contributions and sacrifices people of color made during the country’s founding. He defaces, cuts, and peels back his paintings to show how portraits of American historical figures, such as Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, have traditionally coded racial difference, hid systemic prejudices, and omitted the presence of African Americans. 

Essential Questions to Consider:

-How are portraits windows and mirrors?

-Who has told the stories of our nation's history? What does that mean for everyone else?

-What is the importance today of the work of the three artists represented in this collection?

This collection was created to support the 2018 CCSSO Teacher of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.  

#NTOY18

#NPGteach

Briana White
12
 

Looking Closely at Surrealist Art: Cundo Bermúdez's "Cinco Figuras"

This teaching collection focuses on the surrealist artwork of Cuban artist, Cundo Bermúdez (1914-2008), entitled "Cinco Figuras" from the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum's collections. By applying the Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine, "See, Think, Wonder" to the artwork, teachers can lead students in a discussion that allows them to make observations and support interpretations with details, while noting areas for further exploration. 

Additional resources are included in this collection to help contextualize the artist, his life and other related works. 

Keywords: surrealism, Latino, painting, symbolism, ladder, mirror, clock, five figures

#LatinoHAC #VisibleThinking


Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq"

This teaching collection helps students to think critically and globally by using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting, "Shifting States: Iraq," by Cuban American artist Luis Cruz Azaceta. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.

Included here are the work itself from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, another video from Articulateshow.org, two suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Making a Home: Changes through Time, 18th-20th Century

With rich primary sources including family photographs, advertisements, and historical maps, Making a Home: Changes through Time, 18th-20th Century teaches students about regional homes and the families who lived in them  (be sure to click on the paper clip and/or info icon on each item to find out more about it).

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
20
 

Maps as Primary Resources

Introduction:  How can we use primary sources to learn more about the world around us and how it changes over time.  By applying Project Zero routines, student groups explore maps over time and discuss why/how they change.    

Procedure:

Provide the students with a piece of the Waldsemuller map and have them use the Parts, Purpose, Complexities thinking routine(slide1) or the See Think Wonder routine(slide2).  Usually, I change the terms to fit the activity, so in this case I use Observe, Reflect, and Question.  I tell them to observe and question first.  What are you seeing and why is it there?  What other things do you see but not understand?  Then they go back and reflect on what they think the map is of and how it might be part of a bigger map and what that means.   Generally the questions and observation lead the discussion and I let the students work together to talk about what their map parts have and others do not.  

Once students have finished their observations of the map pieces, show them the whole map(slide3) put together and discuss the history of the map.  What does it look like? Is it the same way our maps look today? Why or why not? Have a discussion about when the map was made, how, and who made it, along with the history of the time period.  How do you think maps have changed since then?

Next, show them the map from 1854 and compare and contrast the two maps.  Discuss the changes in history and why the maps may look so different.  Continue going through each of the maps and ask how the maps have changed over time and why.  Explain the importance of using a primary resource for a map as opposed to a secondary resource.  

Finally, show the last two maps and discuss how maps can be used for more than just showing places, but also for seismographic activity, deforestation, etc.  Discuss what has changed in NYC over the last 200 years and discuss why it might be useful to have that old map?   (Writing a historical novel, seeing where ancestors lived, etc.).

Closure:

I generally don't do a wrap up activity, as the students go into their social studies classes and continue learning about maps and creating their own there.   The classroom teacher works with the students on creating their own maps of our town/neighborhood in coordination with the Project Zero Out of Eden project.  


#PZPGH

Nicole Wilkinson
10
 

Martin Luther King Jr.: The Later Years (1965 - 1968)

Martin Luther King Jr.’s fight for equality did not end with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. In his last years, King’s focus shifted toward achieving economic equality and combating poverty in the United States, denouncing the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War, and contending with the rise of The Black Power Movement.

 This Learning Lab highlights documents, images, objects, and media from the National Museum of African American History and Culture and other Smithsonian units that help to tell the story of Martin Luther King Jr.’s final years, his assassination, and his enduring legacy.

Keywords: nmaahc, Martin Luther King Jr, MLK, Jr., African American, civil rights, last years, Chicago, Vietnam, poverty, Poor People's Campaign, Resurrection City, Memphis, assassination, legacy, Coretta Scott King, Reverend 

NMAAHC Education
48
 

Me and Marvin Gardens and the Effect of Plastic Garbage in Our Water

This collection is created to introduce and enhance the novel study lessons of Me and Marvin Gardens by Amy S. King. The resources will supplement environmental messages and dire warnings found in the book about the pollution of our waterways because of plastic. The collection includes artwork and photographs. 

Monica Bullock
8
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