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Found 344 Resources

Preparatory Design for Silk: Diagramming the Repeat

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Waved twigs with large blossoms rise against a background with a lace design. This part of the design alternates with another showing panels framed by ribbons with carnations and containing blossoms and seeds.

Paper Airplane Design Learning Lab

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Science demonstration at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center exploring the concept of stability through hands-on student participation in experimental design, data collection, and graphing to create and test paper airplanes.

Design for Modular Wall System Components: Exploded Diagram

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for modular wall system components. Exploded perspective diagram provides specs and numbered component part information for modular wall system for trapezoidal, single-story prefabricated house. From lower left to upper right, components are as follows: sun shade; door and window end cap; truss braces to be bolted in place; basic building block (a paired module); side window; “full window” end cap. Signed in graphite at lower right: “2/21/62 E. HOYT”.

Verso: diagram of cabin

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Verso: diagram of cabin

Restaurant Florent: Stomach Diagram

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Recto: An illustration of a cutaway view of a human stomach is centered on a cream-colored card. Thin straight lines, extending horizontally or vertically from various parts of the stomach, end in eight food labels, imprinted in miniature black sans serif type: for example, creme caramel, escargots, and coffee.

Verso: Just below the top left edge, Restaurant Florent, capitalized, is followed underneath by the restaurant's address, hours and telephone number, imprinted on three lines. A thin vertical line, ending at the bottom in Design: M&Co, separates the message and addressee areas. On the upper right, a rectangular outline encloses the word Stamp.

Restaurant Florent: Stomach diagram

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
An illustration of a cutaway view of a human stomach is centered on the page. Thin

straight lines, extending from various parts of the stomach, end in eight food labels in miniature black sans serif type: for example, creme caramel, escargots, and coffee. Restaurant Florent, in larger, yet small, capitals, is centered above, and the address, telephone and hours of business are centered below. A thin-lined rectangle surrounds the whole.

Training Diagram, Shepard

National Air and Space Museum
Mercury Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr., used this diagram of the control console of the Freedom 7 spacecraft to familiarize himself with the instrument panel. The craft itself had extremely small quarters which would have made it awkward to study the actual control panel for extended periods of time.

Freedom 7 was launched on May 5, 1961, and lasted 15 minutes 28 seconds. Shepard reached an altitude of 116.5 miles, making him the first American in space. His suborbital spaceflight was conducted to determine the effectiveness of human space exploration and the performance of the Mercury spacecraft above the atmosphere.

NASA gave this diagram to the Smithsonian when the spacecraft went on exhibit at the Arts and Industries building in October 1961.

The Shepard Training Diagram

Before Alan Shepard flew his historic 1961 suborbital mission on Freedom 7, he had to learn how to operate his spacecraft. This simple photographic chart, which is 75 cm (29.5 in.) high and a bit over a meter (40 in.) wide, helped him memorize the layout of his instrument panel. The very simplicity of this training aid and of the instruments it represents provides a window on the earliest days of U.S. human spaceflight. The rather crude aid highlighted a central feature of Freedom 7's cockpit instrumentation: It was sparse, even compared to later Project Mercury orbital flights. Still, this simplicity can be misleading; the Mercury capsule was a complicated piece of machinery requiring equally elaborate training.

This diagram is labeled "Capsule 7" because Shepard's was the seventh spacecraft in the series. It shows the four main panels in front of the astronaut. The most noticeable feature (represented in bottom center) is the large circular screen used to display images from a periscope that looked outside the capsule-this provided Shepard's main view. In the original Mercury design, two small portholes also provided an exterior view, but a very limited one. The astronauts fought against the porthole concept and won a rectangular window in front of the astronaut's head-an intervention later made famous by Tom Wolfe's book The Right Stuff. Shepard, however, flew the last of the porthole-equipped capsules, so that during his brief time in suborbital transit through space, the periscope provided his only effective view of the Earth from a hundred miles up. But the view was "beautiful," leading him to describe cloud cover on the East Coast and the islands and reefs of the Bahamas.

Other instruments in the center panel provided basic orientation. A clock, along with a time counter in seconds, provided the time and the mission elapsed time-on a fifteen-minute mission he did not need to count hours, or even minutes, from launch. At the top of the panel there are three needles giving the orientation of the capsule in roll, pitch and yaw. At upper left on the center panel is a gauge giving acceleration and deceleration forces in "g's"-multiples of the Earth's gravitation pull. Shepard and all the early astronauts endured extremely heavy forces: eight "g's" on the way up and eleven coming back down. Finally, for the parachute descent of his capsule into the ocean, Shepard had an altimeter and a rate of descent gauge.

The far right panel provided fundamental information on the cabin atmosphere and cooling, on the capsule's batteries and electrical power, plus controls for the radios. Immediately to the left of the main panel are lights for various important functions such as separation of the capsule from the booster, retrofire and parachute deployment. They would light green when things worked; red when they did not. To the left are switches for manually overriding these critical functions, on which Shepard's life depended. Finally, switches and the gauge on the left provided control over cabin lights and the attitude control system. Shepard had two independent attitude control systems and two sets of control jets. A control stick in his right hand, not shown in the diagram, provided the mechanism for changing the attitude of his capsule in space by commanding the firing of the jets.

After his flight, Alan Shepard hung on to this poster-board diagram as a souvenir before giving it to the Smithsonian in fall 1965. Upon doing so, he signed it, making it an even more valuable artifact of the earliest days of humans in space.

Diagram Software for the NeXT Microcomputer

National Museum of American History
A paper box includes one 4 1/2" hard disc with a Diagram drawing program, as well as one spiral-bound notebook of instructions and four loose sheets.

Chair design

Archives of American Art
Diagram : 1 p. : handwritten, ill. ; 27 x 20 cm.

Chair design

Archives of American Art
Diagram : 1 p. : handwritten, ill. ; 28 x 22 cm.

Early Plan Diagram with Central Plan Focus

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Sketch of early plan diagram for Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership building with triangular central plan focus

Brain Diagram (Consciousness, Sensation, Perception, Voluntary Action)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Color print of a magazine page explaining the functions of the brain. Features blurbs of text and brain illustrations focused on consciousness, sensation, perception, and voluntary action at the bottom of the page. A photographic image of a man with his left arm raised in front of a black car appears on the center right of the composition. An illustration of the man's head in profile that shows the inner workings his brain occupies the upper portion. The colors associated with particular brain functions in the images below (red, purple, green, and orange) are repeated and combined in the larger brain above. Green arrows indicated the movement between the different colors or functions inside the brain. The black car reappears to the left of the large head's eyes, with a red arrow and thin line connecting the car, eyes, and brain.

Rate of Military Expenditure Diagram, Page from Fortune

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Black and white printed page from Fortune magazine with a bar chart showing American military expenditure throughout the early 1940s in relation to national income. Bars emerge from a map of the United States at bottom. A dark, cloudy sky is behind the bars above. Verso: Japanese printed text and color illustrations.

Design for Prefabricated House: Detail

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design detail for prefabricated house in style of US patent drawings. Three main components in wood with some sort of fill material. Possibly for structural brace or bracket. At lower left, diagram with piece of wood indicates how material meant to be cut and grained.

Design for Sofabed

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for sofabed. At upper right, partial plan gives dimensions of armrest and seat, while below at left, partial front elevation shows upholstery in red and describes mechanism by which either the back cushion folds down, or an upholstered armrest folds down (diagram inconclusive). At lower right, side elevation shows red upholstery again, provides dimensions, and indicates slatted armrest. Margins ruled in graphite. Inscribed with Deskey No. 8343.

Design for a Candelabrum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A woman standing on a column supports both handles of a stand with seven sockets (meant to be eleven) holding burning candles. Four sockets are decorated with lion heads and other three with stylized foliage. Lower right, perspective diagram shows all eleven sockets with arms; left is scale.

Design for End Table

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for rosewood-veneered end table. At upper left, perspective view of object in intended location next to armless sofa or divan. Rectangular frame open to front into which three longer shelves extend forward; the top shelf creates a split-level top surface. At lower right, plan and side views. Inscribed with Deskey No. 8603, crossed out with reference to new scale diagram.

Design for Prefabricated House

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for prefabricated house: mechanical drawing. Exploded diagram shows modular prefab unit’s base surrounded by flattened front and rear walls, erect side walls with windows, corner support beams and roofing comprised of long, 5-sided caps for each standard bay plus planar overhangs on either side. Two figures present, one at door and the other opposite him. Salmon, olive, and turquoise Cello-Tak used.

Design for Modular Wall System

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for modular wall system. Exploded diagram shows various prefabricated structural elements: front entry portal with windows; wall, floor, and ceiling panels with truss braces and angled windows; rear window panels. Signed :2/21/62 E. HOYT” at lower right.

Design for Snap-Together Chair

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for blow-molded plastic, snap-together chair for Union Carbide. At center, perspective shows planar chair with three identical panels comprised sides and back; these have groove at half-height into which the seat slides. At right, perspective diagram shows assembly process; above, detail of snap-together components. Below right, incomplete sketch of similar detail.

A DIAGRAM / OF THE / STATE / OF /ALABAMA

National Museum of American History
After Alabama became a state in 1819 and after the Indian Removal Act of 1830, white settlers and their African slaves arrived in the area in great numbers. This map was created under the auspices of the General Land Office, a federal agency that was formed in 1812. The agency took over functions begun under the Federal Land Ordinance of 1785. This map shows Alabama divided into square townships 6 miles on each side (townships at the edges of the state tend to be smaller and irregular in shape). Some townships are designated A, B, C, D, or X. The scale seems to be 18 miles to the inch. The identified towns are Cahaba, Florence, Huntsville, Mardisville, Mobile, Montgomery, Sparta, St. Stephens, Tuscaloosa, and Wetumka. The Cherokee Cession is shown, as are the Choctaw Cession of 1830, the Chickasaw Cession of 1833, and the Creek Cession of 1832. One meridian runs through St. Stephens, a settlement along the Tombigbee River (here spelled Tombeckee) that served as the original capital of the Alabama Territory. Another meridian runs through Huntsville, the first incorporated town in the region. An east-west line at 31° north latitude divides Alabama from West Florida. Another east-west line divides the Northern and Southern surveyor’s districts. The text at bottom reads “Exhibiting the situation of the Public Surveys, shewing what records of the same are on file in the General Land Office and the Surveyor General’s Office, the Townships, the field notes of which are yet to be transcribed for the General Land Office and recorded in this Office, also, what Townships the original field notes of which are not on file in either Office, having been destroyed by fire in December 1827, and which have to be retraced for the purpose of obtaining the Original Land Marks to be preserved on record in the General Land Office and This Office. Surveyor’s Office, Florence Alabama Jas H. Weakley Surveyor General of the Public Lands in Alabama.” Ref: Jas. H. Weakley to James Whitcomb, Commissioner of the General Land Office, Nov. 16, 1840, in Public Documents Printed by Order of the Senate of the United States (Washington, D.C., 1841), vol. 3, pp. 134-135.

Designing Media: Chris Anderson

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
One of 31 video segments featured in 'Designing Media', the new book, DVD and website by Bill Moggridge. More info on 'Designing Medi'a available at http://www.designing-media.com Chris Anderson is confident that the magazine format is here to stay, as long as it makes the most of the unique attributes of magazine design, energetically pursuing luscious images, diagrams, and illustrations, with dramatic layout and rich production values. He feels the ambivalence of working to create a magazine that is owned by Condé Nast and writing books that are distributed by Disney, while in his heart he wants to celebrate the possibilities offered by the Internet to serve individual needs and desires in niches of focused interest. He believes that the print side of Wired should strive to add value to the Web, while the Web serves the endless expanse of amateur interests, even as it relies on the printed magazine to pay the bills. More info on Designing Media available at http://www.designing-media.com
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